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Is this SF, Fantasy, or something else?

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This is a back book summary I wrote for a Penana novella I did: A programmer experiencing non-locality meets a painter demonically possessed, who is obsessed by underground tunnels he claims are the home of demons. They embark on a journey into the underground, and are captured by MIPs. After narrowly escaping with their lives, they plan their next stage of their life: encrypting their lives so it wont happen again.

This is for Life Like Wires In Sand.

The problem is this only encompasses the first few chapters. Because I wrote it by the seat of the wooden chair, as I took a ride on the sailboat of time, it quickly morphed into a fiction and non-fiction hybrid about time travel, and how time travelers would view the present day.

Compared with my earlier work, the genre seems less clear. Except obviously Science Fantasy of some sort.

It's at about 35,000 words, and not even half way done yet.
#1 - September 11, 2017, 10:09 AM
« Last Edit: September 11, 2017, 10:11 AM by SarahW »

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Yes, this is fantasy of some sort. I'm not sure what non-locality and MIPs mean.
#2 - September 11, 2017, 06:46 PM

Just woke up, the song bird sang to me. Anywho, non-locality has to do with being in two places at once. While there is such a phenomenon with quantum computing, it means something different with people. Specifically revolving around remote viewing (which I've done.) MIP is Military Industrial Complex Police, a very dark budget security guard.

I assume the end of a time travel book doesn't have to involve a big epic final battle? Then again often my endings end up being fake outs, with the MC not always getting entirely what they want. Theoretically then the book could go on for infinite, yet it has to end at some point.

Current themes: How video games influence an individuals cultural dynamic, and how it gives them a distorted view when they come to eventually meet an actual time traveler. The time traveler representing what all had gone wrong with society after the third world war, and how he serves as a contrast to the society just on the verge of the conflict. A society where spy gadgets are ubiquitous, and the governments eventual attempted crackdown on encryption is hopeless.

I may have to understate some themes when I edit.
#3 - September 12, 2017, 04:44 AM
« Last Edit: September 12, 2017, 04:51 AM by SarahW »

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Current themes: How video games influence an individuals cultural dynamic, and how it gives them a distorted view when they come to eventually meet an actual time traveler. The time traveler representing what all had gone wrong with society after the third world war, and how he serves as a contrast to the society just on the verge of the conflict. A society where spy gadgets are ubiquitous, and the governments eventual attempted crackdown on encryption is hopeless.

I may have to understate some themes when I edit.

Thanks for the definitions. These are more plot threads to me than themes. Although they border.

My YA is alternate present with psychics and spies. Themes deal with belief and religion. Also, what's worth sacrificing for. The narrator is Fate. The Hero's Journey gets twisted a little. Or at least my MC (main character) wants to twist it. He wants to escape it, but Fate.
#4 - September 12, 2017, 08:18 PM

Thanks for the definitions. These are more plot threads to me than themes. Although they border.

My YA is alternate present with psychics and spies. Themes deal with belief and religion. Also, what's worth sacrificing for. The narrator is Fate. The Hero's Journey gets twisted a little. Or at least my MC (main character) wants to twist it. He wants to escape it, but Fate.

Ah ok that's plot threads. My English teacher never explored themes very deeply. When we read animal farm, she often confused the two.

Well it's not so much "spies" for me, as the inverse: encryption and steganography are so ubiquitous that it makes the job of a secret agent that much harder.

Sort of like how Cyberpunk makes the internet ubiquitous and treachorous, Spypunk makes it so you'll often see kids repurposing matchboxes and cigarette boxes as ways to keep messages from being seen. They might use the bar codes on merchandise as a one time pad to encrypt messages to each other, and only go out at night. Or use "dead drops" to communicate on offline file sharing networks, subverting certain issues with the internet.

It's not about spies, so much as kids who subvert the spies. An inverse spy thriller. With time travel.

Actually instead of saying kids, I should say millennial Spypunks. Millenials range from my age (28) to as young as my Nephew and Nieces.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwohadcUv4A&t=2s For an example of what I mean by dead drop. The new dead drops.
#5 - September 13, 2017, 07:17 AM
« Last Edit: September 13, 2017, 07:26 AM by SarahW »

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Those details sound fascinating, SarahW. I'd love to see some time traveling Spypunks...
#6 - September 13, 2017, 05:21 PM
Kell Andrews
www.kellandrews.com
Twitter @kellandrewsPA

DEADWOOD, Spencer Hill, 2014
MIRA FORECASTS THE FUTURE, Sterling, 2016

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I think you have your genre name: Spypunk.
#7 - September 13, 2017, 08:31 PM

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