Author Topic: Editor involvement in early stages of series books/sequels  (Read 3169 times)

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Offline Megan

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Editor involvement in early stages of series books/sequels
« on: January 14, 2011, 05:55 PM »
Been wondering about this as I work on my first sequel--those of you who've written sequels or series under contract, how early did you share a draft with your editor?  Did you get feedback from critique partners first and do a fair bit of revising, or did you get start working with your editor with a pretty rough draft?  Any thoughts on this, what works best and why?
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Offline thunderchikin

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Re: Editor involvement in early stages of series books/sequels
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2011, 07:16 PM »
My editor got a beta draft of my sequel, which is the first draft with one pass for glaring errors and missing scenes and includes such incredible writing as [insert chase scene here].  She prefers to work on the story early to help shape the plot before it becomes too difficult to change, although I always feel guilty sending in such loose work.
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Offline elissacruz

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Re: Editor involvement in early stages of series books/sequels
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2011, 07:25 PM »
 :nothing

I've been working on a sequel with my agent, but I've wondered what would happen when an editor gets involved, so I'm curious to see what others say about this.
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Offline ello

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Re: Editor involvement in early stages of series books/sequels
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2011, 07:30 PM »
 
My editor got a beta draft of my sequel, which is the first draft with one pass for glaring errors and missing scenes and includes such incredible writing as [insert chase scene here].  She prefers to work on the story early to help shape the plot before it becomes too difficult to change, although I always feel guilty sending in such loose work.

Oh wow, my editor offered to take a look at a draft in that early a stage (for my sequel) but I said I'd prefer to get her a more substantive draft as I'd be too embarrassed to give her something so raw. She said it was up to me, but now you have me wondering if I should take her up on it.
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Offline Jaclyn Dolamore

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Re: Editor involvement in early stages of series books/sequels
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2011, 08:15 PM »
The draft I sent my editor of Magic Under Stone had me totally nervous. I know it has some loose ends, a too-abrupt ending, some stuff she is going to say is too adult, some boring patches, etc... I still think it's pretty [word censored] good, though. I mean, in a definite diamond-in-the-rough way. Still, I've been angsting about it, because I'm not sure exactly what is the expectation...it was sold as a three chapter + synopsis proposal and I turned in the whole thing seven months later (with Sea and Sky rewrites included in the seven months!), so I wrote it fast, and I think it was definitely good for the speed with which I wrote it. But I'm still used to not showing things to agents and editors until they're as good as I can make it...and I know it's definitely not as good as I could make it, with time.

I feel quite a bit better after reading this thread...
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m_stiefvater

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Re: Editor involvement in early stages of series books/sequels
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2011, 08:12 AM »
I have a really, really hard time getting input at early brainstorming stages of a sequel. It seems to murder my creativity and leave it in four or five large pieces by the roadside. I try to keep my editor in the dark as much as he'll let me (and at this stage, he lets me get away with a lot) because I only get one chance to get his first readers impression. I don't want to ruin his objectivity. I do bounce ideas off my crit partners at every stage though.

Offline rab

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Re: Editor involvement in early stages of series books/sequels
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2011, 09:38 AM »
Mine went through a couple of beta readers and was in the best shape I could manage before I sent it off to my editor. Like ello, I'd be embarrassed to send raw stuff, and like Maggie, I want that first reader's impression from my editor. Tons of idea-bouncing goes on with my fabulous crit partner thoughout the writing, but not with my editor.
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Offline lindsey

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Re: Editor involvement in early stages of series books/sequels
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2011, 11:07 AM »
Hi Megan, I'm pretty sure we have the same ed, so would be interesting to hear how you two work together. She offered to brainstorm with me at any point while I write this third book, and I'm hitting a spot in the middle that I might have to talk it out with her. Otherwise, I turn in sucky first drafts that are really just a outline with words attaching it all, along with an apologetic email. Then I revise the suck out of it.
My previous editor was much more involved, and like Maggie, I prefer a little alone time with it. It's like a date watching me great ready for the prom--takes the wonder out of the staircase reveal (obvs, I've been on that willworkforprom dress site too much :))
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Offline Megan

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Re: Editor involvement in early stages of series books/sequels
« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2011, 11:32 AM »
Thanks for sharing your experiences, everyone!  Sounds like it varies a lot from editor to editor, and author to author.  I think I'll wait and see how I feel about this draft when it's done, and discuss with my editor what she feels would work best.

Lindsey--are you with Catherine now?  She's great.  :)
GIVE UP THE GHOST, Holt, 2009
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Offline lindsey

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Re: Editor involvement in early stages of series books/sequels
« Reply #9 on: January 17, 2011, 12:18 PM »
Megan--yes, and I absolutely adore her. She's professional, warm and asks the right questions. And she stepped in mid-series, which is always nerve-wracking! We are in good hands.
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KimJo

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Re: Editor involvement in early stages of series books/sequels
« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2011, 12:44 PM »
My situation's a little different, I think, in that the first drafts of all the books in both of my series are already written and when I proposed the series to my publisher I sent a brief (paragraph or so) synopsis of each book as well as a series overview. So my editor knows what she's getting. Since I've learned a lot about writing since I wrote some of those, I revise pretty extensively before I send to my editor. I usually do two passes, one really in-depth where I do a lot of fixing and expanding (my first drafts sometimes look more like really long outlines than actual stories), and a second read-through to make sure everything's consistent and that I didn't make any errors in the expanded bits.