Author Topic: Solstice MFA Program: new video leads to deadline extension!  (Read 111 times)

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Offline meg-kearney

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The Solstice Low-Residency MFA in Creative Writing Program of Pine Manor College has received such a positive response to its new video, featured on the Association of Writers & Writing Programs "Campus Visit Video Series," that we've extended our application deadline to APRIL 20 for writers hoping to begin earning their degree this summer/fall!

Solstice is one of the only low-residency programs to feature a PEDAGOGY TRACK. Our low-residency format means you don’t have to quit your job to earn your MFA; learn to balance your work, family, and writing life over the course of this two-year program. Students spend five, 10-day residencies on our bucolic campus just five miles from downtown Boston, then spend the remaining part of each semester working one-on-one with a mentor via email and snail mail.

Our faculty includes Laura Williams McCaffrey, Renee Watson, and David Yoo, along with writer-in-residence Grace Lin. Special guests this summer are Toni Buzzeo and Eric Gansworth.

To watch our video, and for more information and an online application form, visit www.pmc.edu/mfa.

Offline meg-kearney

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Solstice MFA Program: Because WeNeedDiverseBooks
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2015, 08:20 AM »
Because we believe in inspiring and promoting books that reflect the voices of America, the Solstice Low-Residency MFA in Creative Writing Program of Pine Manor College features the most diverse faculty in the country. This, coupled with a warm, welcoming community of fewer than 50 students and our optional Pedagogy Track, makes the Solstice MFA Program unique.

Apply by April 20 for a summer/fall start! www.pmc.edu/mfa

Writing for Children & Young Adults faculty members include:

Writer-in-Residence Grace Lin is the author and illustrator of picture books, early readers and middle grade novels. Her first book, The Ugly Vegetables, was published in 1999 and heralded as an American Booksellers Association's “Pick of the List” and a Bank’s Street College Best Book of the Year. The Ugly Vegetables was also nominated for the California Young Reader Children’s Choice Award and named a Growing Good Kids Book Award Classic. Grace followed that success with the publication of more than a dozen more books, including Dim Sum for Everyone!, Fortune Cookie Fortunes, and Olvina Flies. Grace’s first middle-grade novel, The Year of the Dog, was released with glowing praise, as was her sequels, The Year of the Rat and Dumpling Days. Grace’s 2010 Newbery Honor book Where the Mountain Meets the Moon was chosen for Al Roker's Today Show Kid’s Book Club and was a New York Times Bestseller. Ling & Ting, Grace’s first early reader, was honored with the Theodor Geisel Honor in 2011. Her most recent and forthcoming books include Starry River of the Sky and Needle at Sea Bottom. An Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award nominee for the U.S., Grace says her books are about the Asian-American experience because she believes, “Books erase bias, they make the uncommon every day, and the mundane exotic. A book makes all cultures universal.”  Visit www.gracelin.com.

A passionate advocate for the arts in education, faculty member Laura Williams McCaffrey mentors teens in creative writing, in addition to regularly contributing educational materials for children and teens to both HarperCollins and Penguin’s young readers divisions. Laura’s third young-adult speculative fiction novel, tentatively titled Lyla’s Flight, is forthcoming from Clarion Books. Lyla is a dystopic fantasy as well as a mixed-format novel that includes comics storylines integrated into prose text. Laura is the author of two other young-adult fiction novels: Water Shaper (2006), selected for the 2007 New York Public Library Books for the Teen Age list; and Alia Waking (2003), named an International Reading Association Notable Book. Alia Waking was also a nominee for the annual Teens’ Top Ten Books list and for Vermont’s Dorothy Canfield Fisher Award. Laura is currently at work on a fourth speculative fiction young-adult novel, a story inspired by her research of WW I nurses. Visit www.laurawilliamsmccaffrey.com.

Faculty member Renée Watson is the author of This Side of Home (Bloomsbury 2015) and Harlem’s Little Blackbird: The Story of Florence Mills (Random House 2012). Her work has received several honors including an NAACP Image Award nomination in children’s literature. Her novel, What Momma Left Me, (Bloomsbury 2010), debuted as the New Voice for 2010 in middle-grade fiction. Her one woman show, “Roses are Red Women are Blue,” debuted at the Lincoln Center at a showcase for emerging artists. One of Renée’s passions is using the arts to help youth cope with trauma and discuss social issues. Her picture book, A Place Where Hurricanes Happen (Random House, 2010), is based on poetry workshops she facilitated with children in New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina and was featured on NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams. Renée has worked as a writer in residence for several years teaching creative writing and theater in public schools and community centers throughout the nation. She has taught college courses on writing for children as Adelphi University and University of New Haven. Her articles on teaching and arts education have been published in Rethinking Schools and Oregon English Journal. Renée has given lectures and talks at many renowned places, including the United Nations Headquarters and the Library of Congress. She grew up in Portland, Oregon and currently lives in New York City. For more information about Renée visit www.reneewatson.net.

Faculty member David Yoo is the author of the novels Girls for Breakfast (Delacorte), which was named a NYPL Best Book for Teens and a Booksense Pick and Stop Me If You've Heard This One Before (Hyperion), a Chicago Best of the Best selection, of which author Jonathan Lethem wrote, “David Yoo's voice is so witty and charming it only seems fair to give warning: he’ll break the hearts of teenage readers of all ages with this bittersweet love story.” His forthcoming collection of essays, The Choke Artist (Grand Central), documents the experience of growing up as a Korean American with characteristic humor. David has published fiction and nonfiction in various journals, including The Massachusetts Review, Rush Hour, the Maryland Review, as well as in various anthologies, including Who Can Save Us Now? (Simon & Schuster) and Guys Write for Guys Read (Viking), and he has a regular column in Koream Journal. He holds a BA from Skidmore College and an MA in Creative Writing from the University of Colorado, Boulder. He currently teaches at the Gotham Writers’ Workshop, and resides in Massachusetts. For more information, visit www.daveyoo.com.