Author Topic: Creative Commons--do you use it?  (Read 204 times)

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Offline LisaKS

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Creative Commons--do you use it?
« on: May 31, 2014, 07:10 AM »
I recently learned about Creative Commons and I was just wondering how--or if--any of you make use of it for your own work. I am particularly interested in its use for artwork (of your own) that you post online, but feel free to share other uses, too. It just seems strange to me--writers talk about not wanting to post synopses of pbs online for fear of their ideas getting stolen, yet illustrators cheerfully place finished and unfinished work online all the time. How does that work?
HIGH TIDE FOR HORSESHOE CRABS (Charlesbridge, 2015)

Offline AnneB

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Re: Creative Commons--do you use it?
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2014, 08:45 AM »
I've often wondered that myself. Thanks for posting, Lisa!

Offline corpirate

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Re: Creative Commons--do you use it?
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2014, 10:40 AM »
I'd be really interested in hearing other people weigh in on this too.  I did a little bit of research on the topic and have mixed feelings.  I'm an artist and my husband is a musician so collectively we've had/heard many stories of people who put their creative works up online and had them stolen.  The thing about intellectual property is that it's really a messy subject.  I can put up a beautiful picture of a monkey riding a unicorn leaping over saturn eating an ice-cream cone, and three months later see a huge brand campaign with billboards of a monkey riding a unicorn leaping over saturn eating a hamburger.  Did they see and steal my idea? Possibly.  Did the ad campaign manager happen to be a unicorn loving sci fi techi who went to the zoo and was inspired by the monkeys?  Possibly.  Do I have enough money to hire a lawyer and see if I was right?  No. 


It looks to me like the CC format was actually built to protect creative people.  Putting an end to people losing credit for their creative works because one can easily screen shot and post something that is on the web.  I'd be interested in reading more about how much they claim that actually protects creative property because I would argue that intellectual property conscious people were already going the extra mile to give credit where credit is due.  I think that the best use of the CC format would be for magazines, blogs, etc. who are looking for content and can pull content from CC and use it free of copyright issues.  In that aspect, I guess you could argue that one would have a chance of being discovered and offered future paying gigs, but I would say that those chances are slim.  Mostly because organizations that are looking to use free work are probably not in the position to pay.


Personally, as a creative person, I have two sets of creative works: the ones I keep under lock and key because I hope to monetize them, and the ones that I like and am willing to put out into the world and know that they will probably be used one way or another without me knowing.  The second group of creative works is the set I would put up on CC...at least that way they have some chance of being used with my name attached so I got credit.  I would view writing the same way.  Little articles I wrote that would be interesting for blog use, snippets of poetry...that sort of thing I would put on CC.  A glimpse of the first chapter of the novel I'm working on would never go on CC.


I think that illustrators and musicians post their works on line because it is the only way to get exposure.  I've worked with major companies, have friends that work for major companies, and know several intellectual property lawyers.  If you don't think that people spend time on line looking for new and fresh ideas that can be used, tweaked and profited from, you are only fooling yourself.  Always bet on yourself.  Protect your work. Don't take it lightly.

What is your dream, how are you chasing it?
Kat Ford

www.giddyupfairytalecowgirl.com
(picture book website)

www.corpirate.com
(art website)

Offline LisaKS

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Re: Creative Commons--do you use it?
« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2014, 07:42 PM »
Thanks for your thoughtful response, corpirate, and for your interest, AnneB! I saw the recent post on watermarks, too--seems like it's all part of the same conversation: How important is it to protect the artwork (finished or unfinished) you share online, and how do you go about doing it most effectively? The answers may differ from person to person, but I'd be interested in hearing what some of the possibilities are at least.

I just went to a workshop yesterday, and it's now clearer to me than ever that art directors, agents, etc. look for an online portfolio immediately if they have any interest in your work. I want to put something out there for them to see, and I'd like it to be work that I'm pleased with. Corpirate, your suggestion to share some, but keep your main, active, projects to yourself makes sense. For other people who are reading this, is that what you do, too? It sounds like CC is maybe not the way to go for me at this point, despite its good intentions and benefits in certain situations. Do you--corpirate, and whoever else cares to weigh in--mostly go with a copyright on your webpage and consider that enough for the work you choose to share? Sounds like maybe watermarks are becoming more popular--?

Also, I  wanted to apologize for the delayed response. I actually posted--or thought I posted--soon after I saw what you wrote last time, but for some reason my post never showed up  : (   
HIGH TIDE FOR HORSESHOE CRABS (Charlesbridge, 2015)

Offline corpirate

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Re: Creative Commons--do you use it?
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2014, 05:12 PM »
I can't even begin to articulate how important I think it is to protect your work.  I don't consider watermarks to be bad, the only time when I don't use them is when I'm just being plain lazy (which is very, very often).  I don't put anything I'm working on that I plan to market and sell out into the public domain until it is: finished, applied for a copyright with the library of congress, and has the website & social media handles secured for that project.  Not every piece of art I make falls under that category, so the rest of the stuff I put a watermark to protect/promote my work and put on my website and social media avenues.  I haven't mastered the "make it so no one can save it" on the website trick, but these days you can just screen shot the image and have it anyway...so I think a watermark is the best bet. 


I do agree that you most definitely need an online presence.  I believe in treating your art like a business, you have something that no one else has...the ability to create like only you can!  Promote, protect, and always, always, always gamble on yourself.  In other words...protect your stuff now the way that you plan on protecting it if you become the next Tim Burton...because you very well might.
What is your dream, how are you chasing it?
Kat Ford

www.giddyupfairytalecowgirl.com
(picture book website)

www.corpirate.com
(art website)