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Creative Commons--do you use it?

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I recently learned about Creative Commons and I was just wondering how--or if--any of you make use of it for your own work. I am particularly interested in its use for artwork (of your own) that you post online, but feel free to share other uses, too. It just seems strange to me--writers talk about not wanting to post synopses of pbs online for fear of their ideas getting stolen, yet illustrators cheerfully place finished and unfinished work online all the time. How does that work?
#1 - May 31, 2014, 07:10 AM
HIGH TIDE FOR HORSESHOE CRABS (Charlesbridge, 2015)

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I've often wondered that myself. Thanks for posting, Lisa!
#2 - May 31, 2014, 08:45 AM

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Thanks for your thoughtful response, corpirate, and for your interest, AnneB! I saw the recent post on watermarks, too--seems like it's all part of the same conversation: How important is it to protect the artwork (finished or unfinished) you share online, and how do you go about doing it most effectively? The answers may differ from person to person, but I'd be interested in hearing what some of the possibilities are at least.

I just went to a workshop yesterday, and it's now clearer to me than ever that art directors, agents, etc. look for an online portfolio immediately if they have any interest in your work. I want to put something out there for them to see, and I'd like it to be work that I'm pleased with. Corpirate, your suggestion to share some, but keep your main, active, projects to yourself makes sense. For other people who are reading this, is that what you do, too? It sounds like CC is maybe not the way to go for me at this point, despite its good intentions and benefits in certain situations. Do you--corpirate, and whoever else cares to weigh in--mostly go with a copyright on your webpage and consider that enough for the work you choose to share? Sounds like maybe watermarks are becoming more popular--?

Also, I  wanted to apologize for the delayed response. I actually posted--or thought I posted--soon after I saw what you wrote last time, but for some reason my post never showed up  : (   
#3 - June 15, 2014, 07:42 PM
HIGH TIDE FOR HORSESHOE CRABS (Charlesbridge, 2015)

I can't even begin to articulate how important I think it is to protect your work.  I don't consider watermarks to be bad, the only time when I don't use them is when I'm just being plain lazy (which is very, very often).  I don't put anything I'm working on that I plan to market and sell out into the public domain until it is: finished, applied for a copyright with the library of congress, and has the website & social media handles secured for that project.  Not every piece of art I make falls under that category, so the rest of the stuff I put a watermark to protect/promote my work and put on my website and social media avenues.  I haven't mastered the "make it so no one can save it" on the website trick, but these days you can just screen shot the image and have it anyway...so I think a watermark is the best bet. 


I do agree that you most definitely need an online presence.  I believe in treating your art like a business, you have something that no one else has...the ability to create like only you can!  Promote, protect, and always, always, always gamble on yourself.  In other words...protect your stuff now the way that you plan on protecting it if you become the next Tim Burton...because you very well might.
#4 - June 24, 2014, 05:12 PM
What is your dream, how are you chasing it?
Kat Ford

www.corpirate.com

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