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Picture Books (PB) / Re: Submit text-only PB with visual element?
« Last post by JMoudahi on December 02, 2022, 08:16 AM »
Thank you for these comments! This is extremely helpful 😃 sounds like this situation is not unheard of, and I’ll discuss some of the details a bit more with my agent.
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Hi Veronica,

What about having a text-only version for submissions...and include a link in the query to a password-protected version that includes the illustrations on your website? That could make sure your files aren't too big, and take care of any query samples that are pasted.

I'm sending tons of good luck vibes your way!
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Picture Books (PB) / Re: Submit text-only PB with visual element?
« Last post by Debbie Vilardi on December 01, 2022, 06:32 PM »
I have seen deals posted where the same agent reps both the author and the illustrator. So there are sales from this type of submission.

It benefits the agent because they get their 15% from each of you.

It may benefit you also. Picture books are so short that visuals carry a lot of the action. I've often wondered if I'd have better luck with sales if I could present my vision instead of just my text. Hopefully, your agent understands your vision.

Perhaps you need to ask more questions. Can you see art samples? Why do they think the illustrator is a good fit? Will it be clear that you can take the text without the art and vice versa? Has the agent had success with this model?

All that said, I don't think it can hurt you unless the art really doesn't work. And I mean does not work at all. Remember, the manuscript is still submitted as such and the art is an extra and it won't even be a full sketch dummy from what you've written.
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Picture Books (PB) / Re: Running into a Wall (Question about Voice)
« Last post by Ree on December 01, 2022, 05:57 AM »
I second Julie M. Go to a bookstore and read a bunch of pbs. It'll remind you how they are written and what you loved about them.

Ree
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Picture Books (PB) / Re: Submit text-only PB with visual element?
« Last post by JodyJS on December 01, 2022, 04:03 AM »
Hi JMoudahi,

This has happened to me before. I was also unsure. The illustrations turned out to be darling, but the book never sold. Who knows why?

I'm told that in such cases, even though the words and art have been submitted as a package, an editor will frequently NOT choose the illustrator, or she will like the illustrations but not the text and hire the illustrator for a different project.

I'm not sure writer or illustrator gains anything by sending both, but I don't think it hurts either of you.

Good luck!

Jody
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Picture Books (PB) / Re: Submit text-only PB with visual element?
« Last post by Mindy Alyse Weiss on November 30, 2022, 10:48 PM »
I'm sure your agent wouldn't have suggested it if they didn't think it was a great match. I'm guessing they'd make sure an editor knows they can pursue the text with an illustrator of their choice or the illustrator for one of their other projects if it seems like a better fit than the complete submission.

Maybe you'll feel better once you see the work of the illustrator? It's especially helpful if the illustrator has been published, so it will be a debut for only one of you.

I trust my agent 100%. If they ever want to pair me with one of their illustrators for one (or more) of my picture books, I'd be thrilled to do it.

Fingers and toes crossed for you!!!!
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Picture Books (PB) / Submit text-only PB with visual element?
« Last post by JMoudahi on November 30, 2022, 08:12 PM »
Hey, hive mind!
I have a question about going on sub with my text-only PB. My agent offered me the option of submitting it with an added visual element (not a full dummy, a few spreads and title page). If I choose to go this route, my agent would pick one of their illustrators to create this and the illustrator and I would essentially be going on sub together with OUR book.
Is this common? Good/bad? On one hand, I suspect that it could be helpful to submit as a package deal, making less work for the editor. On the other hand, the editor would have to fall in love with both my text and someone else's art before saying yes... which maybe feels more risky? Any thoughts/insight would be appreciated, as I am new to this and it would be my debut book.
Thank you!
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I am an author/illustrator. I am in the second phase of edits on my early chapter book (High interest/Low Complexity). It is a humorous story and the illustrations absolutely add to the story's humor. I have submitted dummy picture books with my queries in the past. How does it work for early chapter books (as a general rule) I understand that the first 10 pages (or so) will be submitted with my query letter (as a general rule) but do I include sketches/complete illustrations embedded with the text of those pages? Cover?

All advice welcome. Thanks in advance.
~Veronica
www.veronica-stanley-hooper.com
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Picture Books (PB) / Re: Running into a Wall (Question about Voice)
« Last post by Debbie Vilardi on November 29, 2022, 06:21 PM »
It sounds like you have a draft. That's great. Set it aside for a bit and read every picture book you can get your hands on that was published in the last few years as well as classics with spider and butterfly characters.

Then imagine yourself at age 5 or 7. Younger you needs to write this story. Bring that wonder to it. You can leave spider and butterfly facts for the back matter. Focus on the story for the rest. And leave room for the art. (This last can be done in edits.)

You might also post what you have for critique here: https://www.scbwi.org/boards/index.php?board=121.0. That may help us see any issues and guide you.

It could also be that you are putting a lot of pressure on yourself because the story is so important to you. Dad will love you no matter what.

I hope this helps.
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Picture Books (PB) / Re: Running into a Wall (Question about Voice)
« Last post by JulieM on November 29, 2022, 04:02 PM »
I agree with Vijaya, and will add that it's great to visit the local library and study books that interest you. Note their different voices - what works and what doesn't. Try writing your story in similar voices and keep going with the versions that show promise. You'll eventually find the voice you like best for your story. Sometimes it takes a number of tries to find what works. Yes, it uses up time, but that time is not wasted in the long run because you are learning how to write children's books along the way, which will come in handy if you have future books in you.
Best of luck!
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