SCBWI's Blueboard - A Message & Chat Board

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Hi Cathy,

There is a lot to learn in terms of how publishing works. In most businesses, the company produces and markets a product it creates. In traditional publishing, the company buys the product and then does production and marketing, with the author and illustrator (if there is one) supporting the latter. 

Are you planning to self publish? If not, do not do anything with illustrations unless you are an artist. Publishers hire the illustrator.

You are also often far better off finding critique partners or posting for a free critique on the Blueboard than hiring an editor on Reedsy. I always advise using as many free resources as possible because you may need to edit many times in order to be ready to submit to editors at publishing houses. See https://www.scbwi.org/boards/index.php?board=121.0 and https://www.scbwi.org/boards/index.php?board=127.0. But a good editor can be very helpful. It's just a good idea to learn to self edit as you will have to revise for a publisher too. Reading critique threads can help you learn. But critiquing is a good teacher too.
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This process is so new to me and I'm like a sponge trying to absorb everything! 

I had to send out a "brief" that contained at least 500 words, however, no going over a certain amount. Since my book is around 490 words, the editor received my whole story. Pretty much all the books I'm planning on writing will be this same format. I have other ideas on the back burner that will be more involved. Thanks you. Cathy
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Picture Books (PB) / Re: Formatting a Rhyming Children's Picture Book
« Last post by olmue on Today at 06:08 AM »
Ah, your second post clarifies the situation.

There are editors for hire who you can pay to edit your manuscript to get it ready for submission to a traditional publisher or to get it ready to self publish.

That is different from editors who work for a specific publisher who look at submissions with the goal of acquiring/publishing them.

It sounds like this editor (I looked up Reedsy) is the first kind. I think what they mean is, don't send them 32 pages with a few lines of text on each one. (Ie don't send a book dummy.) Just the 4-5 pages of running text will do. I would not be concerned about the verses being split across page breaks; I assume you are submitting this electronically, and once the person opens the file, they can tell that the verses go together. In the final, illustrated layout of a book, of course they will not be split up, but this is not that stage yet.
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Thanks for the information. Even though the story is written and the characters have their quirks, nothing beyond that about the characters is set in stone. By asking the original question, I've started to get more clarity about how I should approach the cultures of the characters. A slight rewrite may be in order.
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Hi Debbie,

I have 15 versus that takes up 4-5 pages along with a glossary page.  When placed in a child’s storybook template, it fills up 32 pages and placeholders for illustrations. I sent the editor my 4-5 page manuscript. I presume when the editing is completed, I send this to the illustrator for their input then place everything in this storybook template.  I’m a newbie to writing a book and learning as I go. She informed me she looked at what I submitted and said the formatting was good. I can add the page numbers in case the pages get separated.  I signed up with Reedsy and the editor scheduled a 2/19 date to start working on my manuscript. I hope this makes sense. Thank,  Cathy
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To me, this could be left for the call, when an agent or editor often asks how you envision the book. But remember that art is up to the artists and art director, often with some input from the editor. You'll have to decide how important this is to you. Right now, friend groups with this type of diversity are pretty much the norm (unless the circumstances of the story make it unlikely), so I wouldn't be too concerned about it.
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Hi  Cathy,

I'm unclear about whether the editor doesn't want you to paginate within the text (show how you think the final book will lay out) or paginate the manuscript. Usually there is a header with your last name, the title and a page number. This helps the editor if they drop an unstapled manuscript.

If this is someone you're paying to edit or taking a class with, they should give you formatting advice too. I've never heard of a submission with a specific date for reading, so that's why I think this may be your situation.

I've never been worried about versus being split across a manuscript page. That might just be me though. Sorry I can't be of more help.
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Good afternoon,

I already submitted my manuscript for my rhyming children's picture book. I added my contact info and word count to the top of the page and centered the title and my name on the top of the first page. Does this info need to be at the top of every page? My manuscript is about 4-5 pages long and there's a glossary at the end.  I double spaced and I'm using Time Roman 12 font. Per the info that I read from the editor that I'm using, she stated not to page number or add illustrations. The versus are about 4-5 lines each. Now what makes this book a little different is that there's only one real character in this story. My dog, Paulie. The story is about him and how he was found as a stray and brought to the shelter to find a family.  The editor is scheduled to read the manuscript on 2/19/23. I want to make sure it's cleaned up and pretty good in formatting before then. I did make a few changes on 2/2/23 and submitted it, however, I realized some of the versus skip to the next page which I feel needs to be corrected. Any suggestions is greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Cathy
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Thanks for the insight.
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Hi Aaron,

I think you can mention in your query that your story is set in or features multicultural kids or neighborhood. "In this multicultural picture book, ...," for instance.

Jody
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