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Picture Books (PB) / Re: Looking for An Editor
« Last post by Debbie Vilardi on Today at 06:02 PM »
Congrats, Mari!

You've received fantastic advice. Paid professional critiques are great...but only get them after you've had free peer critiques that have helped you take a manuscript as far as possible. For picture books, I find that having two great groups, or at least one awesome group and critique partners help so you can take the feedback, revise as much as possible, and have fresh (or semi-fresh) eyes on the revision. Then repeat, repeat, repeat until it's as strong as you can get it.

Debbie shared some great ways to find a critique group and/or receive peer feedback. 

If you're interested, I run a monthly PBParty New Draft Challenge & Critique Train. The next one is May 20 EST. You can plan ahead, but don't start writing until challenge day. When you finish, add your name to the Critique Train doc. The person above critiques your manuscript and you critique the person below you. You can revise your new PB and send it, or send an existing one. Whichever PB you want fresh eyes on the most. Here's a link: https://mindyalyseweiss.com/pbparty-new-draft-challenge-critique-train-faq/

Also--if you'd like to find an agent, you should have at least 3 - 5 really strong picture book manuscripts before querying. If they like the first one you send, they'll ask for at least two more to make sure you're a great match.



This is a totally fun idea. I may have to join one in a few months. (I have deadlines for other stuff now.)
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Picture Books (PB) / Re: Looking for An Editor
« Last post by Mindy Alyse Weiss on Yesterday at 09:08 PM »
Congrats, Mari!

You've received fantastic advice. Paid professional critiques are great...but only get them after you've had free peer critiques that have helped you take a manuscript as far as possible. For picture books, I find that having two great groups, or at least one awesome group and critique partners help so you can take the feedback, revise as much as possible, and have fresh (or semi-fresh) eyes on the revision. Then repeat, repeat, repeat until it's as strong as you can get it.

Debbie shared some great ways to find a critique group and/or receive peer feedback. 

If you're interested, I run a monthly PBParty New Draft Challenge & Critique Train. The next one is May 20 EST. You can plan ahead, but don't start writing until challenge day. When you finish, add your name to the Critique Train doc. The person above critiques your manuscript and you critique the person below you. You can revise your new PB and send it, or send an existing one. Whichever PB you want fresh eyes on the most. Here's a link: https://mindyalyseweiss.com/pbparty-new-draft-challenge-critique-train-faq/

Also--if you'd like to find an agent, you should have at least 3 - 5 really strong picture book manuscripts before querying. If they like the first one you send, they'll ask for at least two more to make sure you're a great match.

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Picture Books (PB) / Re: Looking for An Editor
« Last post by Debbie Vilardi on Yesterday at 06:04 PM »
Not only will an editor be better able to help you once you've had critiques, but also you won't have to go back to the editor again and again because your work will be closer to done. (Repeated edits are not a reflection on the editor but on the level of completeness of the manuscript.)
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 :bunny2
I too am new to SCBWI and am interested in joining a Critique group.  I have written and illustrated  a chapter book (perhaps two, depending on if it is divided).  My book takes place outside of the US, but it is not what I would consider "realistic fiction."  My email is jessica@dsandblaw.com
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Picture Books (PB) / Re: Looking for An Editor
« Last post by HaroldU on Yesterday at 09:03 AM »
I agree with Debbie. I work as a freelance editor and publishing consultant, but I always recommend that writers get involved with a critique group BEFORE coming to me. You'll learn a lot from the process--from critiquing others' work as well as getting their feedback--and when/if you do decide to hire an editor, your manuscript will be at a point where they can really help you.
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Perfect - thank you!
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Picture Books (PB) / Re: Picture Books that are about co-existing
« Last post by Debbie Vilardi on May 13, 2021, 08:52 PM »
Invasive species are a huge problem in terms of habitat and species loss. Kudzu, certain mollusks, longhorn beetles. These species wreak havoc. Invasion was not a term chosen lightly.  The issue is there is no way to keep such a species in a territory. The idea is interesting, but not environmentally sound.
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Nebraska / Re: Critique exchange: hooks, loglines, query letters
« Last post by chloe-burgett on May 13, 2021, 06:59 PM »
Wow, this is a fabulous example, Judith. Thanks for sharing.

Here's my first logline. (or is it too long for that? is it a synopsis?)
It's for a sequel to my Wizardly Little Red Hen book. Any suggestions are welcome!

The Ugly Gobling
The cave-dwelling, old-magic serving, shape-shifting Goblins collected many treasures. Gems, coins, rare artifacts from faraway lands. But one day, the beautiful smooth stone they traded for hatched...
Into the ugliest gobling they had ever seen. They loved him!

This is the story of a truly adorable cygnet raised with the hilarious habits of bumbling bat Goblin traders, who all think he’s… well, the Ugly Gobling.

The morning finally comes (right before Gobling bed-time) when he sees a swan family. Will things click into place? Will the mixed-up cygnet finally find where he belongs?
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Picture Books (PB) / Re: Picture Books that are about co-existing
« Last post by JulieM on May 13, 2021, 04:12 PM »
No Monkeys, No Chocolate by Melissa Stewart may interest you - https://www.penguin.com.au/books/no-monkeys-no-chocolate-9781580892889
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Picture Books (PB) / Re: Picture Books that are about co-existing
« Last post by karen-b-jones on May 13, 2021, 01:32 PM »
Would it be better with a native species that is annoying to deal with, but belongs there as much, if not more, than the farmer?  I say that because people are often even encouraged to kill invasive species on sight.  The goal isn't really tolerance when dealing with Asian giant hornets (Murder Honets), for example. 
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