SCBWI's Blueboard - A Message & Chat Board

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In PB sales announcements, I’m noticing more instances of the writer and illustrator having the same agent. This type of arrangement might make agents more likely to accept writers-only or illustrators-only, as agents still get the commission for both.

I'm seeing this too, but you still can't submit to them that way even if you know a professional illustrator who is really good. Once or twice I have heard of someone asking for a submission by an author and an illustrator together at a conference/workshop, but I don't think either of those sold.
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You're welcome, V. The amount of entries has gone up each year...probably due to the success stories and growing number of agents and editors.
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In PB sales announcements, I’m noticing more instances of the writer and illustrator having the same agent. This type of arrangement might make agents more likely to accept writers-only or illustrators-only, as agents still get the commission for both.
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Time was (dial back ten years or so) when almost no agents accepted PB from writer-only creators. But back then you could sub directly to editors in the majority of publishing houses, and that was the route to traditional publishers if you never wrote longer stories.
If you did write novels (MG or the newly invented category of YA) you'd get an agent for that, and good agents would then also market your PBs almost as an aside.
More and more (in a rather rapid succession) almost all publishing houses stopped accepting PB directly, and agents began accepting writers who only wrote them even if they didn't write longer books.
As of about two years ago, the agenting world had begun to constrict the opening for PB writers who don't illustrate.  Sadly, this isn't accompanied by publishers accepting these manuscripts directly. For all the reasons mentioned (a huge number of PB subs and the split commissions), we are reminded that PBs are the artists medium.
There's still a larger number of agents who accept (and some who even specialize) writers of PB who don't illustrate than there were back 10-15 years ago, when they were almost non-existent. But the number of subs has increased many folds, and the competition is fiercer than ever.
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Thanks so much for clarifying, Debbie and Mindy. And wow, a thousand entries!!!
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I agree with everything that's been said. And I'm always grateful for Harold popping in to share his knowledge.

I think one more issue for agents is the HUGE amount of picture book submissions. Some newer writers might not have critique groups and shoot off a different manuscript to the same agent/agency every time they receive a rejection. Saying they're closed to picture books (or text only for picture books) can lower their slush--but they could still keep an eye out for new writer-only clients through referrals, conference critiques and submission opportunities, etc.
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V--both the agents and editors will view the finalists and request any they'd like to see more of (and occasionally ask for additional manuscripts as well). Last year we had 1003 entries and whittled it down to 50 in the main final round and 20 in the Illustration Showcase.

Finalists aren't obligated to send to everyone who requests. But if an entry resonates with an agent...it could turn into a great match. :)

Hi Sophie--agents and editors don't see any of the entries that aren't in the final round/Illustration Showcase. Only the judges and I see them.

With picture books, you should have at least 3 manuscripts polished and ready to submit. If you're in the final round, hopefully you'll receive a magical yes! But if you don't, you might want to consider leading with a different PB for any participating agents/editors you think might be a good match.
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Research / Re: How to read more books
« Last post by jojocookie on Today at 03:53 AM »
worldcat.org

openlibrary.org

You just need to set up your account. But they're free.
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I'm wondering, with so many agents/editors included in this contest... if one were to enter and not be selected, does that mean you shouldn't submit to those agents/editors at a later date?   I guess I'm just nervous about submitting to so many people at once -- usually it's like, send it out to a few people, wait for a response (if any), do some tweaking, then send it out to a few more..
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V, if the committee selects your work, it gets posted for the agents and editors to see. If they like it, then you submit to them. You could simply ignore any agent likes. That's what I recall from the past and from scrolling through this year's rules.
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