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Picture Books (PB) / Re: Biographies of women in STEM : Still a hot commodity?
« Last post by lauriew on November 28, 2021, 06:29 AM »
As a fellow writer of books about women in STEM (5 published, 3 coming out in the next few years), I can tell you the market is still saturated. BUT, that doesn't mean there isn't room for another well-told story of an unsung woman in the field. Write the best book you can and get it out there. Kids still need to hear these stories.
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Picture Books (PB) / Re: Biographies of women in STEM : Still a hot commodity?
« Last post by dewsanddamps on November 27, 2021, 08:03 PM »
I was told it's slowing down but I haven't asked for any updates--it's not something I'm working on now, so if it's rebounding any I wouldn't know it. And it's really about catching the right agent's eye with the right project at the right time--you could get lucky even if the market's turned down.
  :goodluck
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I think this topic will stay in good favor as long as books keep selling. But even when a topic or theme becomes saturated a new great book still gets through. It's as much how well you write it as the topic/theme. Find the hook that brings the kids in and don't let them off that hook and the gatekeepers will bite too.
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Are publishers still on the lookout for picture books about women who made significant contributions to STEM fields?

I am working on one right now and wonder if it will be well received by agents or publishers.  The exciting thing for me is that this woman's story has never been told in a children's book, even though youngsters should find her story intriguing (adults certainly do).   This story is not unlike the Rosalind Franklin story; she did much of the critical background work in her field, but did not get credit for it.

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Graphic Novels / Re: Stats on GN page/panel content
« Last post by Debbie Vilardi on November 26, 2021, 06:22 PM »
It's more that there was no children's publishing industry per se back when Oz was written. I look at Alice in Wonderland the same way. We know these older books are stories originally told to children, but I don't know that marketing was done toward them until later on.

There have always been books for adults written with child protagonists. This is considered fine and normal in the industry. But the general feeling is that kids like to read about people their own age or older. Eight year olds simply don't want to be perceived as babies by reading about babies (anyone younger than they are). Because this is a business, it almost doesn't matter if the convention is true as long as publishers believe it is.

With older books like these, there's always a question as to whether a gatekeeper would publish it today. But their popularity makes them fodder for other formats. (And being in the public domain and therefore free to work with certainly helps for those works this applies to.)
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Graphic Novels / Re: Stats on GN page/panel content
« Last post by andracill on November 25, 2021, 11:03 PM »
I read Ender's Game (and all the *sequels) when I was in my 20s. But my son read EG when he was 12 and really enjoyed it. In fact, it was assigned reading for the regular-track 8th graders at his middle school (he read Zoe's War in his honors English class). He didn't read the sequels until last year (at 19), though. He seemed to like them okay -- but if I put them in order of my favorites, they'd go: Xenocide, Speaker for the Dead, Ender's Game, and then way down the list, Children of the Mind. And I read the first Shadow book but didn't enjoy it enough to read any of the others.

Just commented to illustrate yet again how different books appeal to each of us differently. :grin3
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Graphic Novels / Re: Stats on GN page/panel content
« Last post by A. S. Templeton on November 25, 2021, 09:12 PM »
I don't know about the Oz series but Ender's Game was definitely written for adults.
Can't disagree, but again, Ender's Game demonstrates that a juvenile MC--starting at the tender age of six!--can carry the main narrative, without the story being written for kindergartners or even preschoolers.

The argument that a nine-year-old MC automatically makes a story MG or even chapter book is, simply put, rubbish.
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Graphic Novels / Re: Stats on GN page/panel content
« Last post by David Wright on November 25, 2021, 08:27 PM »
I don't know about the Oz series but Ender's Game was definitely written for adults. The sequel (which is awful) is all about politics. Books 3 and 4 are better, but not enough to get me to read the Ender's Shadow series.

The Wheel of Time also transitioned into GNs (moving from adult shelves to YA). It too gets into politics and quite violent themes later. Given the size of those tomes, it wasn't a surprise the GNs for book1 had to be delivered in multiple parts.
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Graphic Novels / Re: Stats on GN page/panel content
« Last post by A. S. Templeton on November 25, 2021, 07:13 PM »
The Oz books were written for adults...
What a curious opinion... one contradicted by the author himself. From the introduction to The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (emphasis added):

[The] modern child seeks only entertainment in its wonder tales and gladly dispenses with all disagreeable incident.... Having this thought in mind, the story of “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” was written solely to please children of today. It aspires to being a modernized fairy tale, in which the wonderment and joy are retained and the heartaches and nightmares are left out.

L. Frank Baum
Chicago, April, 1900.

The large type, 200-220 words/page, and copious illustrations of the Denslow-artwork edition together suggest that Baum clearly meant TWWoO to be read aloud side by side to the tykes and self-read by the older set.
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Graphic Novels / Re: Stats on GN page/panel content
« Last post by Debbie Vilardi on November 25, 2021, 06:34 PM »
The Oz books were written for adults, so they may be ageless. They originals are not for the under 9 set. They are middle grade at the youngest today. 

I had to separate the text into images and give image notes for the book I wrote along with writing dialog in script format. I think this is usually the case with GN scripts, so it isn't up to the artist to do layout necessarily. I had 2-3 images per page, usually 5 or 6 per spread.
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