SCBWI's Blueboard - A Message & Chat Board

Anyone for Graphic Novels?

Discussion started on

lizjonesbooks

Guest
I'm putting this here just because I don't have the foggiest idea where it belongs-- do with it as you wish!
:D
I'm on the nominating committee for graphic novels for the 2007 CYBILs, and have enjoyed reading the books so much!
It occurred to me this evening that there is no discussion board here at Verla's specifically for graphic novels.
This genre is really growing right now-- it's an exciting field, and more open to newcomers and fresh ideas about how things ought to look and be organized and marketed than some of the other genres.
There are GN's for everyone from young children to adults, and the demands and benefits (and marketing options) are different enough that they could probably benefit from having a little space of their own.

What do you think?
#1 - January 01, 2008, 08:31 PM

Rhonda

Guest
This is fantastic. I'm just starting to get into reading manga/graphic novels, and I'd love to write one of my own eventually!!!
#2 - January 02, 2008, 04:57 AM

YAAAAAY!!! :thewave
#3 - January 02, 2008, 05:13 AM
The Arts-Angels, Track 1: DRAWN TO YOU
2012 from Brushstroke Books

cdb

Guest
This topic interests me as well. I'm curious to learn more. Is there information anywhere regarding how to write one or does one just need to read what's out there?  :eh2

Curious as ever,
Carole  ;D
#4 - January 02, 2008, 05:52 AM

Emeritus
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region carolinas
I sat on the floor in Borders and started leafing through a few middle-grade graphic novels to get a feel for them. I'm in support of anything that will keep boys reading, and these seemed right on target. I bought a couple for my seven-year-old for Christmas and he LOVED them.

Any authors out there who'd like to share their knowledge about the market and what publishers are looking for? Word count and story structure? It's difficult to know where to begin. For instance -- I'm assuming, just like picture books, the publisher likes to pick the artist.

Thanks for starting this thread, Liz. What have you learned during the judging process? What separates the "okay" book from the award-contender? Good luck with all the reading!


#5 - January 02, 2008, 06:06 AM
http://twitter.com/EnaJones
http://www.EnaJones.com

CLAYTON STONE, AT YOUR SERVICE
Holiday House, 2015
CLAYTON STONE, FACING OFF
Holiday House, 2016

Freyja

Guest
1. The Complete Idiot's Guide to Creating a Graphic Novel, by Nat Gertler and Steve Lieber

2. Writing and Illustrating the Graphic Novel: Everything You Need to Know to Create Great Graphic Works, by Mike Chinn

I picked up both of these informative books at my local B&N, so they shouldn't be hard to find.
#6 - January 02, 2008, 10:11 AM

lizjonesbooks

Guest
Scott McCloud also has a wonderful book on the how to of writing comics. (can't remember the name off the top of my head, but you could google it.)
One of the things I find most interesting about this genre is how all-over-the map the storylines are. Some follow the traditional plot arc and resolution, while others delve into surreal, unresolved episodes that don't map well to anything else I've read. There are also a huge number of hybrid novels which don't meet the criteria for graphic novels as currently defined (Hugo Cabret comes to mind... and Ellie MacDoodle, and Clive Barker's Abarat), in which the illustrations play a huge role in the storytelling. I've been thinking about delving into this genre with my own writing and illustrating, and have a couple projects in the works right now.
And like everyone else-- I think one of the best things you can do is read, read, read!!
#7 - January 02, 2008, 10:41 AM

Live, Love Books!
Member
Poster Plus
Neat, guys! I'm definitely interested in learning more.  :)
#8 - January 02, 2008, 10:54 AM
www.JessicaBurkhartBlog.com
@JessicaBurkhart * IG: @jessashley87

Anna M Lewis
Member.
Poster
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region illinois
I attended all the Graphic Novel classes at SCBWI-LA. Mac McCool was the presenter/instructor for 2 classes. The other class was an industry review. Mac has a great blog about the genre!
My favorite moment was when all the teachers in attendance shared their love of the genre. Slower/challenged/reluctant readers (I'm not sure what the correct term is) love graphic novels because they don't have to carry a 'baby' book. The teachers' comments made me a little emotional.     
#9 - January 02, 2008, 11:08 AM

ecb

Guest
Scott McCloud's book is UNDERSTANDING COMICS, and it's a classic.
#10 - January 02, 2008, 01:58 PM

JB

Guest
Yay for this thread. I don't write graphic novels but they intrigue me and I'm excited to read more.  :thanks
#11 - January 02, 2008, 03:02 PM

cdb

Guest
I wonder if Ellie MacDoodle and those other two were subbed as graphic novels.
#12 - January 02, 2008, 03:06 PM

lizjonesbooks

Guest
Ellie was, originally, but wound up in midgrade. Hugo Cabret went to midgrade from the get-go, and Abarat isn't a 2007, so...
 Since I'm a lumper,not a splitter, I tend to add the hybrids into the classification... in any case, I'm really glad to see people expanding their horizons with this stuff!
And that Mac McCool workshop sounds fantastic!!
#13 - January 02, 2008, 03:58 PM

Thanks for the Mac McCool info.  I checked out his blogsite and love it.  My son (who is a 23 year old UofO multi-media design graduate) and I have been working on a graphic novel together. 
#14 - January 02, 2008, 08:34 PM

Anna M Lewis
Member.
Poster
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region illinois
Thanks guys for checking out Mac McCool's website. He is a fantastic teacher... really knows the industry, presents it clearly, and is very supportive of graphic novel writers. So, again, if you can, take one of his classes.
 
On a side note, do you ever go to conferences and have preconceived opinions of a person? I thought Mac (aka Christian) might be a stand-offish and unapproachable artist/comic illustrator/writer. (I guess I've encountered a few.) Well, he's not. He's friendly to everyone and so supportive of other writers. Again and again, I'm amazed of my misconceptions and surprised by the outcome!   

#15 - January 02, 2008, 10:42 PM

Mac McCool

Guest
Hi all,

Anna, thanks for the super nice intro.  Another resource I often mention during my workshops is the excellent Understanding Movies book by Louis Gianetti.  You can get an older edition to save money (the main difference is the film references he uses are not as up-to-date as in recent editions... obviously!).  It's very useful for authors interested in writing for graphic novels to understand the visual language and visual storytelling concepts that comic artists use all the time (shots, angles, perspective, staging, coloring for mood, lighting effects, etc.) to communicate.  Keep in mind that the most artists know this stuff inside and out, so writers should not attempt to dictate how the visuals should appear.  Yet, when you have a strong visual idea, it will give you the terminology to express it clearly.

In other news, I posted an entry on what's in French comics bookstores on my blog.  They're still years ahead of us, but we're catching up.

Congrats to Verla and her helpers for launching this forum!  It's time we all take kids comics (or "graphic novels!") seriously!  There are marvels to be done!!!  Let's get busy crafting them!!!

Cheers,




#16 - January 05, 2008, 03:59 AM

Noodler & doodler
Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region sfnortheastbay
Years ago, I suggested to a few teachers that graphic novels could be beneficial in helping "non-conformist" young readers; however, my idea was politely dismissed. I'm glad to hear that educators are coming around.  :yippee

Glad you joined us on the blue boards, Mac. Timing has been off for me to attend the big events in NYC and LA but I hope to attend a workshop of yours in the not-so-distant future. If you ever make it to the Bay Area, let us know!  :)
#17 - January 05, 2008, 04:28 AM
« Last Edit: January 05, 2008, 04:29 AM by ecm »
Forthcoming books:
HONU AND MOA (fall 2018), author/illustrator
THANKU picture book anthology (fall 2019), contributor

Anna M Lewis
Member.
Poster
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region illinois
Mac, great to see you here!

 :bananadance :bananadance :bananadance
Anna Banana Dance

No prob about the intro. My favorite quote is by Frank Burns on M*A*S*H---"It's nice to be nice to the nice!"
#18 - January 05, 2008, 08:30 AM

Steve

Guest
I was blown away when I read Persepolis  -  they're making that into a movie now  -  will be interesting to see how that comes out in visual form

but that is a powerful work and, I believe, one of the earliest graphic novels  -  I still think it stands out among most of the rest which have followed on its success

Steve     :typing
#19 - January 05, 2008, 10:10 AM
« Last Edit: January 28, 2008, 07:03 AM by Steve »

Thanks for sharing tips, Mac.  I have passed it along to my son (the artist in our family).  He has been reading your blog and said he really enjoyed it.  It's nice to be able to share my love of art with my 23 year-old son.
#20 - January 05, 2008, 10:42 AM

Persepolis IS great and riveting (and out in movie form already--just now.  Will probably win an Oscar).  What makes it so good is that it is biographical and uniquely so (since it's told from the perspective of a Persian who was a child when the country was taken over by the new regime.

But, not to contradict Steve, it really is far from the earliest graphic novel.  There was Maus decades before (the Holocaust but with mice as protags) and Will Eisner, too.  (I don't care for his stuff. So lacking in hope.) 
#21 - January 06, 2008, 09:28 AM
The Arts-Angels, Track 1: DRAWN TO YOU
2012 from Brushstroke Books

There are loads of great graphic novels that include things from Maus and Watchmen to Bone and ElfQuest, even adaptations like Robert Aspirin's Another Fine MYTH by Phil Foglio and Neil Gaiman's Stardust which is now in theaters.

I've had lots of feedback that things I write would be good as graphic novels, and although I've has Scott McCloud's books for years (as well as fun examples like The Cartoon History of the Universe), I knew I didn't know enough of the cinemagraphic nature of the media to effectively *write* for it (wouldn't even attempt to draw it)!

Thanks for all these great references! Who knows? Maybe I'll check 'em out for some future projects...?

(fringe comic geek and adoring fan of Foglio, Pini and Moore!)
#22 - January 06, 2008, 12:44 PM

Noodler & doodler
Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region sfnortheastbay
Don't forget about Raymond Brigg's classic graphic novels When The Wind Blows and The Snowman.
#23 - January 06, 2008, 06:05 PM
Forthcoming books:
HONU AND MOA (fall 2018), author/illustrator
THANKU picture book anthology (fall 2019), contributor

lizjonesbooks

Guest
Mac-- Welcome!!!
And thanks for posting the link to your blog-- I can't wait to read all of it!
:D
#24 - January 09, 2008, 05:59 PM

Rhonda

Guest
There are loads of great graphic novels that include things from Maus and Watchmen to Bone and ElfQuest, even adaptations like Robert Aspirin's Another Fine MYTH by Phil Foglio and Neil Gaiman's Stardust which is now in theaters.

Ohhhhh Stardust...fantastic book with beautiful images...you HAVE TO READ IT if you haven't!!
#25 - January 09, 2008, 06:06 PM

Sarah Perry

Guest
Wow!  I wander away from the boards for a few weeks, and we get a graphic novel forum?   :love

I read a fair amount of manga & have enjoyed what I've experienced of American GNs... but with all the material out there (and an increasing number of specifically YA-aimed graphic novels being published), it can be hard to know where to start.  I'm looking forward to seeing this section grow. 
#26 - January 16, 2008, 10:15 PM

Mac McCool

Guest
Something exciting!  An amazing comic artist, Kazu Kibuishi, just released an impressive graphic novel for kids (and grown-ups!), Amulet.  And I'm not the only one saying so.

One convenient resource to keep up with all things comics-related is the PW Beat blog by Heidi McDonalds.

And Edna, I go to San Fran every so often (most recently for the Miyazaki exhibit).  It's just a short airplane hop from So Cal!
#27 - January 21, 2008, 07:53 AM

lizjonesbooks

Guest
Amulet is out!!! I  :love Kazu Kibuishi's work-- discovered him when I read Flight. I may have to Amazon that one!
#28 - January 26, 2008, 11:54 AM

Creator of Mootastic Art and Children's Books
Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region newengland
Thanks for mentioning Amulet Mac - I got it a couple of weeks ago and it's been begging to be read since then - hopefully soon! (The art is so great too, very inviting looking characters.

I love Kazu Kibuishi too Liz! Daisy Kutter is one of my all time favorite graphic novels (and I don't even like Westerns).
#29 - January 27, 2008, 01:28 PM
Site - http://sruble.com
Twitter - http://twitter.com/StephanieRuble

picture book: EWE AND AYE (Disney-Hyperion)

nomi

Guest
Thanks for the Mac McCool info.  I checked out his blogsite and love it.  My son (who is a 23 year old UofO multi-media design graduate) and I have been working on a graphic novel together. 
Mac,  Thanks for the link and the encouragement.  GNs are intriguing, and I'd love to give one a try!
Kim,  Have you and your son had any luck with collaboration?  My daughter and I have collaborated on a few works,  :yippee :yippee and it was terrific fun...still looking for that contract, though!
--Nomi
#30 - January 31, 2008, 05:19 PM

Members:

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.