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Thanks Debbie,  this is exactly the information I need.  I am science / nature geek and inexperienced in this market.  [I did publish a sequel to The Wind in the Willows, but it was self-published, and it is really an adult book.  It did very well, but my current book would work better being traditionally published.]

BTW, I used that Accelerated Reader Search Tool to look for Ada Lovelace books for kids and got 14 matches!  However I did not find a single hit on the woman I am writing about or even her subject matter.  This is either a really good sign or a bad one, ha.  Maybe her field is too technical or too obscure. Maybe her contribution was not significant enough, but at least to me the story seems very exciting.  Of course all authors feel that way about their books.
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Chapter books usually publish as part of a series. You'd have to find a publisher with a series that fits or propose your own series.

A nonfiction picture book usually falls under 2000 words or so. (Look at books by Smithsonian Press also.) Try retyping one of these books to see who it really lays out.

If you're targeting ages 4-8, you're writing a picture book and would need to tell the story in as few words as possible. Remember that illustrations or photos would carry some weight in telling the story and cut anything that can be shown that way. Publishers do make non fiction picture books for older readers through age 10 or 12. Sometimes you can find a concordance with a word count on Amazon or find it at https://www.arbookfind.com/default.aspx. This also gives reading levels and other stats.
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Have a look at the books on the Millbrook Press/Lerner Publishing website. They have junior nonfiction and middle grade nonfiction biography books. They would provide a good comparison for your title. Best of luck with your project.

Thanks!  I looked at Millbrook and there are indeed some comparable books.  I ordered "The vast wonder of the world : biologist Ernest Everett" and "Classified : the secret career of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee aerospace engineer" from my library.

I looked at two Rosalind Franklin books for girls, but they were rather dry, but I guess x-ray crystallography is a tough subject to spice up.   I think I can make a more interesting book about my scientist hero.

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The word count is well over what a picture book would be. It's about half of what a chapter book would be. The Junie B. Jones books come in at about 7-8000 words. It also depends upon the complexity of the content. There are publishers for hi-low books. This is where the content is complex, but the reading level is lower. These books are usually geared to teens. Off the top of my head, that is where I think this would fit best. However, others may have other suggestions and ideas.

Thanks, this is good advice.  I have no idea where to go with this project; I am new to this type of book (although I am a nature/science writer).  I think I could expand the book to 7-8000 words or chop it way down for a picture book.   What do you think publishers are looking for in such a STEM book for girls?

There is a lot of interesting ancillary stories associated with the field that this woman was involved in.  A lot of it is non-technical and a lot of really fun stuff for kids.
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Have a look at the books on the Millbrook Press/Lerner Publishing website. They have junior nonfiction and middle grade nonfiction biography books. They would provide a good comparison for your title. Best of luck with your project.
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The word count is well over what a picture book would be. It's about half of what a chapter book would be. The Junie B. Jones books come in at about 7-8000 words. It also depends upon the complexity of the content. There are publishers for hi-low books. This is where the content is complex, but the reading level is lower. These books are usually geared to teens. Off the top of my head, that is where I think this would fit best. However, others may have other suggestions and ideas.
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I have STEM-like book about a woman scientist who was sort of forgotten by history but she make significant contributions to her field.  Her story is vaguely similar to Rosalind Franklin, but I think that the subject matter would be of more interest to young readers.   I have about 3,000-4,000 words.  This is a non-technical book and the science is straightforward.

What genre would this be and what age demographics should I target?
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Picture Books (PB) / Re: book trailer
« Last post by Melody on November 05, 2021, 07:02 PM »
Brian, as others have mentioned, trailers are to plug the book. I do not use my trailers to attract anyone but potential readers. I use them on social media when I am releasing a new book. I think that's what a lot of authors use them for.  There are lots of ways to advertise. You just have to find the method that works for you.
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Picture Books (PB) / Re: book trailer
« Last post by Debbie Vilardi on November 05, 2021, 06:26 PM »
Success has many definitions. The definition a publisher would use doesn't have to be yours. Many traditionally published books don't sell 5000 copies either, so try to get that trailer where your customers are. And see how many books you can sell.
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Picture Books (PB) / Re: book trailer
« Last post by brian-hylbert on November 05, 2021, 08:55 AM »
This. Once you publish, it's published. Unless you sell over 5000 copies, no one in the industry will look at it. Why buy a product that failed and expect if to succeed for you? Remember, this is a business.

i get your point.  i'm approaching this debut as a sort of "proof of concept" for the series that it kicks off.  maybe an intriguing trailer could
pique someone's interest in the concept and aesthetic regardless of whatever paltry # of product i move in my little world... maybe not.
i may be naive in thinking this can be anything more than a "failed product" as you put it without having some real publicity traction already.
i appreciate your candor, 
(slumps off)


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