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Writing, Illustrating & Publishing => Research => Topic started by: Woods on January 30, 2012, 05:57 AM

Title: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Woods on January 30, 2012, 05:57 AM
I am not trying to get cruel humor started on this thread. Quite the opposite. I've tried to search on the Internet about this, but I can't find any helpful information--just blogs making fun of one or the other.

Personally, I don't see that big of a difference. There are so many different personalities all over the world. I have a lot of northern friends who I cherish. The two major differences I can spot are northerners speak loud (and fast) and they won't touch fried food with a ten foot pole. . . .  ::)

The reason why I'm asking this question is my current WIP is set in the Deep South. I want to point out the southern charm . . . just not sure what to point out.

Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Lill on January 30, 2012, 06:43 AM
Well .. be careful .. and make your Southern authentic. Is this set in the present? Because things have changed somewhat. And a lot depends on WHERE in the deep south. Big city? Medium? Small? Rural?

Your larger cities are going to be more mixed. Also any city that contains a military base or a university is likely to be more diverse because both those institutions will pull in a lot of outsiders.

And what age girls?  And where specifically in the South?  I grew up in Georgia, have lived in several states in the last twenty years, and currently live in Texas (for the third time).

I get perturbed when Texas is painted with a broad brush. Texas is a huge state and culture will vary from place. Where I live is definitely more Univision than it is CMT.

And as for Georgia ... which I think is true Deep South ... it depends ... are you talking Atlanta or Vidalia (where the onions come from .. I know.... my sister used to date an onion farmer)?

I have a friend who just moved to Alabama, and Huntsville is a lot different than the lower part of the state, mostly because of NASA being there.

Without specifics, there's not much to rely upon but stereotypes.

So can you zero in on it a bit ...




Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Helen on January 30, 2012, 06:47 AM
It depends on the time period that you are writing about and the area.  I grew up in the South and love sweet tea.  Bologny sandwiches are big also.  Growing up we went to bunkin parties or sleepovers.  We still  say 'ya'll'  and depending on what part of the South, we extend our vowels.....like eeeegg and my husband's name is Ben, but everyone pronounces it 'bin'.....I have noticed that my friends from up north hold their emotional cards closer to their chest. 
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Stephanie Ruble on January 30, 2012, 06:48 AM
The two major differences I can spot are northerners speak loud (and fast) and they won't touch fried food with a ten foot pole. . . .  ::)

I don't think either of those are true, or are only true for some people. Also, the same could be said for some people from the south. Plus, Northern vs. Southern is a huge area. Are you talking about a specific part of the country that's north of where your story takes place, or a certain area of the south? Because Seattle is different than Boston, which is different than NY, which is different than Minneapolis or Pittsburgh. You could do the same in the south: Charleston is different than Miami, which is different than New Orleans, Houston, Albuquerque ... etc.  And big cities are different than smaller towns.

I don't think you can accurately make any big generalities or cliches about half of the country vs. the other half.

By being specific to one person/town/city/region, you will capture the universal.
 
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: amberlough on January 30, 2012, 07:04 AM
This is kind of a cool topic. I was a  Navy brat, so I lived in NY, Maine, Georgia, and went to HS in Charleston, SC. I don't qualify as Northern OR Southern, but I did see a lot of differences between the places. These differences are mainly involving the weather, and how people adapt to it than anything else. The food wasn't that different (except for pulled pork), the speech wasn't that different (not overly, and not in any way that would show up in text), and the people weren't that different. Then again, I always lived near universities or military bases. (And still do....)
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Lill on January 30, 2012, 07:13 AM
When I think of Deep South .... I think of Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, Louisiana, the Carolinas, Tennessee ... maybe parts of Texas.

I grew up and went to college in areas with a rich Civil War History. I think Atlanta might have gotten over it by now, but I'm not sure about smaller towns. There's a lot of pride in land and history and family. Some areas still get Confederate Memorial Day off. A year or so ago I traveled through the lower halves of the Southern States between Texas and Florida. There was a whole lot of confederate flag, Rebel, gun related merchandise to be had in the convenience stores along that route. The man who cuts my hair (he's Hispanic) and I were discussing that recently ... and how he had to tell his wife to not be so friendly when they traveled that route .. because well .. Mexican can be a bad thing to be in those parts.

A lot of people are really surprised when I tell them how strong the German influence is in South Texas. We've got our Weinerschnietzal right alongside our Taco Cabana.

I don't even consider Florida Deep South. For me Deep South is more culture and attitude than location.

Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: olmue on January 30, 2012, 07:19 AM
Charleston is different than Miami, which is different than New Orleans, Houston, Albuquerque ... etc.  And big cities are different than smaller towns.

Heck, Charleston is different than COLUMBIA.

Okay, seriously, though. :) I've lived in nine states, and generalities irk the heck out of me. (While in jr. high in Texas, a girl on the bus found out I'd been born in NJ. "What's it like," she said with big eyes, "Up North??" As if Up North were a place inhabited by two-headed aliens.) But it's equally true that culture can vary a lot from place to place, even within the same state (and yes, I'm serious about what I said above, too!) What it boils down to, though, I think is this: Everywhere, people are nice. And everywhere, people have the same basic feelings. But their ways of being "nice" and their ways of sharing those feelings are different. In Charleston, the way to be "nice" and the proper way to be polite in a grocery store is to meet eyes with whoever you pass and say hello. In Michigan, the proper way to behave in a grocery store is to stay out of people's way, and don't make them nervous by staring at them like a weirdo and making striking up unexpected and possibly unwanted conversation. Both people think they're being "nice."

Another reason people have cultural differences is that the specifics of their environment (weather, what kind of jobs people do) can affect how they approach different kinds of tasks. The fishing industry on an island might bleed into the culture, just as the long winter might, or farming, or working in a very dense area where there is little privacy unless you *decide* to ignore what's staring you in your face. (Which may come across as unfriendly, but in a way, it's allowing someone else to have a little privacy they wouldn't have otherwise if you crowd 8 million people onto an island together.)

I agree with Ani Louse--the best way to make something feel real is to make your characters specific *people.* That way, their quirks will feel authentic to them, even if they don't represent the entire species.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Woods on January 30, 2012, 07:24 AM
The WIP is set south of Georgia (on the coast), and it's present day.

Age of characters: ranging from seventeen to nineteen.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: ello on January 30, 2012, 07:37 AM
You need to differentiate your northern states as well as your southern states and your cities from your rural areas. Your stereotype seems to be aimed more at New yorkers -and by that I mean NYC not the state. But all it is is a stereotype. As well as your comment on fried foods. ummmm, No. They eat lots of fried foods in the north also. They might not eat fried snickers bars, but they'll eat pretty much everything else. The handful of northern girls you know personally might not eat fried foods, but the vast majority of them do. Maybe not everyday, but they do.

I do think that whatever you do, you want to avoid cliches and just give your characters unique personalities. You can give them regional touches without making them stereotypes.

Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Lill on January 30, 2012, 07:37 AM
Okay so South of Georgia on the coast would be Florida? Or are you talking Savannah and Jekyll Island in Georgia?  Coastal living is going to be a whole 'nother ball game ... as retirees and tourists play into the culture a lot .. and there's a more relaxed atmosphere.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Woods on January 30, 2012, 07:44 AM
Okay so South of Georgia on the coast would be Florida? Or are you talking Savannah and Jekyll Island in Georgia?  Coastal living is going to be a whole 'nother ball game ... as retirees and tourists play into the culture a lot .. and there's a more relaxed atmosphere.

Talking about good ol' Jekyll Island. :)
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: olmue on January 30, 2012, 07:47 AM
Um...I also want to add that The North is a big place. Philadelphia is not rural NJ (yes, thank you, there is such a thing), is not Bangor, is not *gasp* one of those places in the geographic north that nobody even thinks about, like Milwaukee or Missoula or Fargo or Spokane... If you have a specific character you want to be coming from the nebulous North somewhere, maybe it would help to decide on a specific place she comes from, first? Then you could research what the charms of that place are, what people value most there, and what kinds of expectations kids grow up having. If you know the specifics of where she comes from, you'll be able to figure out what feels "different" when she gets to Georgia. (Which naturally opens the question: what cultural group is she interacting with in Georgia? White middle class? Northern transplants? Gullah/Geechee culture?)
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Lill on January 30, 2012, 08:05 AM
Yep, definitely zero in on WHERE north and south. And I just have to throw in my funny story ..I was living in a large city .. and a store clerk kept talking about her boyfriend from up north .. I was thinking they must have had a heckuva commute .. until I realized she meant the north metro area. We lived on the south.

One thing I've learned from moving around so much is .. there is a HUGE difference in an area where few people move in or out .. and a place that is a blend of natives and outsiders. Which is why the atmosphere around a university or a military base will be different. And you can have both those atmospheres in the same city. One side can be old roots ... and the other can have a greater influx of outsiders. Just like where I live now .. a coastal ... retiree ... military town. Old money is on one end, young families and military retirees are on the other. There is a difference in shops, restaurants, churches etc from one end to another ... one is more chain .. the other is more upscale and established ... and I'm not in a humongous metro area.


Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Eric Hammond on January 30, 2012, 08:27 AM
Being of deep southern roots, I wouldn't recommend writing about the South if it's an area with which you are not familiar. I would never write about Wisconsin. I know nothing about it, and my efforts would sound faked and plastic, stereotypes and cliches. If I visited, stayed there 6 months... I might begin to get a feel for the people and the lifestyle and the community. I think writers should write what they know.

As said above, the South is very diverse, complex [and yes, Florida is the South, though another flavor, for certain.] Come down, stay a while. Then write.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Stephanie Ruble on January 30, 2012, 08:29 AM
I've lived in nine states, and generalities irk the heck out of me. (While in jr. high in Texas, a girl on the bus found out I'd been born in NJ. "What's it like," she said with big eyes, "Up North??" As if Up North were a place inhabited by two-headed aliens.)

Generalities irk the heck out of me too! Here's a good example of something specific, that has slightly different meanings in one state, and totally different from what Olmue was talking about above:

"Up North" in most of Minnesota means something wildly different than in the South or in other places. Up North in MN usually means Northern MN, and sometimes means: anywhere north of where you live in the state. So obviously, when someone in MN talks about up north, what they are talking about depends on the person and the area in the state they are from. Many times up north is followed by a location so that the other people in the conversation will know where you are talking about ... unless you are talking generally about going up north - most people get that reference without a specific qualifier. It's important to realize that even within a state, the same term can refer to something different, but culturally have a meaning that everyone understands. That's why you really have to be specific to your characters.

If you get something slightly wrong, some people might know, and others might not even realize it. Another example is what is the syrupy and bubbly drink called where your characters are from? Is it soda? Pop? Soda-pop? Or Coke? Even best selling authors can and do get that wrong, but most readers won't know that.

<edited to add> posted at the same time as Lill and just saw her comment about, "Up North." So you really do have to do research on the area your characters are from.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: J.Ro on January 30, 2012, 08:35 AM
I'd think you want to focus on what is more specific to the area you're writing in. Coastal Ga/Carolinas is the home of shag dancing - a particular sort of vinegar and mustard bbq sauce - there are live oak trees and cockroaches that crack when you step on them. It's humid like a wet rag and the 'o's' are pronounced differently then anywhere else in the south. "We went roand aboat the hose (with a 's' sound not a 'z' sound). Coastal kids know about marshes and handling boats and eat lots of seafood. Shrimp shacks are the equivalent of an inland burger joint.  Hurricanes are taken seriously and every spring there will be an influx of people from all over the south for spring break. People know families and generations. Where you go to church is a topic of conversation. Politics seem to be passed down to.

As far as generalizations - it's hard to find real sweet tea outside of the south. I didn't learn to say the 'f' word out loud in an argument till I married a Northerner.

Breathing by Cheryl Herbsman is a sweet romantic YA set on the coast of Carolina - very authentically done, I thought. Might be a good read.

I'm an L.A. girl (lower Alabama, not far from where Bubba Gump operated his shrimping business), lived in Atlanta for 8 years, now in the mountains of North Carolina. All are distinctly different. My significant other is a brass, Italian, upstate New Yorker with a loud mouth and arguments happen loudly and are then over, unlike what I'd known from my own family who are more passive and occasionally will hold a grudge.

Have fun with your story.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Lill on January 30, 2012, 09:11 AM
Given that you're talking about northern vs. southern girls ... and Jekyll Island .. and 17-19 year olds ... is this a Spring Break story?
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: jeffman on January 30, 2012, 09:14 AM
I've lived in a lot of places: north, south, in between, midwest, and now the west. The biggest differences I've noticed are between urban folks, suburban folks, and rural folks. Regional differences are trivial compared to those. YMMV.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: amberturner on January 30, 2012, 12:02 PM
"The biggest differences I've noticed are between urban folks, suburban folks, and rural folks. Regional differences are trivial compared to those."

I TOTALLY agree with what Jeff said on this one.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: rab on January 30, 2012, 01:53 PM
Generalities are bad, I agree, but as someone who grew up in the south and who now lives in the north, it was music to my ears to hear a new student reply, "Yes, ma'am" the other day. I hadn't ever heard that in this area, but I grew up hearing it all the time. It turns out the student had just moved from somewhere in Texas.

The Dictionary of American Regional English (DARE) might be a good resource to help you track down localized speech patterns.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Larissa on January 30, 2012, 01:59 PM


I don't even consider Florida Deep South. For me Deep South is more culture and attitude than location.



Florida is DEFINITELY NOT Deep South.  LOL.  (I live in the Orlando area)

I agree with others who have said it really depends on the specific place more than "north"  or "south". 
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Woods on January 30, 2012, 02:04 PM
Perhaps I didn't make it clear. . . I'm sorry.  :slaphead: I'm actually from the Deep South and I grew up in Georgia. My MC has lived in Georgia her whole life. I know southern ways, but I just want to know what characteristics stand out the most to people whom aren't from the Deep South (or the Georgia area). What may be considered normal to Deep Southerners may be something abnormal to a non-local.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Marissa Doyle on January 30, 2012, 02:49 PM
Well...I guess I still don't understand what you're asking.  If we're not from your character's area, how are we supposed to know what's "normal" or "abnormal"?  Do you really want a list of stereotypes that non-fried-food-eating, fast-talking non-southerners might have about southerners?  :shrug:

I think you might want to concentrate on telling your story and your characters and do your world-building from the inside, rather than worrying about how it might differ externally from other parts of the country. 
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: J-Bert on January 30, 2012, 02:54 PM
I know southern ways, but I just want to know what characteristics stand out the most to people whom aren't from the Deep South (or the Georgia area). What may be considered normal to Deep Southerners may be something abnormal to a non-local.

Every person is going to have a different response to this, many of them conflicting. Since you are writing about a place you know well and love, and that your character knows well, I would focus on what is meaningful to your character (and/or you). Offer up your descriptions, observations, and experiences as true as you know how. Make the southern charm come alive through the character's eyes. The reader will meet you halfway and bring their own background to the table--you can't control what they take away, and every reader is going to interpret things differently. If you are writing with the outsider in mind making assumptions about what they may or may not know, rather than writing from what the main character does know, you risk weakening the writing. The goal is to tell an engaging story, not to instruct--no?
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Melissa on January 30, 2012, 02:56 PM
I concur on the anti-cliche vote AND on the big differences being rural v uban not N v S.  

However, I grew up rural Pennsylvania & moved then after college to NC for 7 years. I was in Carolina for all of two weeks before I took a job at a local diner & then a couple months later moved to a biker bar.  When I went home to PA, the biggest thing I noticed was a) accents/regional slang and b) manners.  All thru Carolina, the default was polite: drivers were more courteous; strangers opened doors. "Ma'am" and "thank you" and "Do you mind" were all through people's sentences.  Oh, and Coca-Cola/Co-Cola/Coke meant the same as "pop" and "soda."  No, the food was not all fried in the South, but there were def regional cuisines.  Pig pickins, awesome local diners, BBQ to die for, & OMFG good pies were all over--but I couldn't find what I considered a good pizza or Philly anywhere whereas in PA/NJ they were all over. Kudzu. I was enthralled by it when I first came South. I found that it was a slower pace for pretty much every repairman or mechanic I encountered during those 7 years (which meant that I was downright baffled when I moved to SoCal after the South). The tea, oh! The tea in the South is so much better--sweet like it should be.

Yankee imports who moved down after I'd been there a while always commented on how slow things got done, & when I went home I grumbled about how fast everyone wanted things.

There were more country stations--classic & "new country"--as well as great local music joints where true Blues can be found, which was lacking in the North.  Back home, I found new classic rock bands all over, but the Blues bars were definitely easier to find in the South.

The weather in NC is so amazing that sometimes I swore I could taste flowers from how humid the air is, and on the coast, I still catch myself licking my lips for that salty air. The beaches in the North, California, Pac NW, Ireland, & Scotland don't give me that urge. . . kinda like the South in the Fall never gives me that need-to-inhale bc of woodsmoke & fallen leaves scent.

Response to snow was a biggie.  I'd moved out of an area where 6inches of snow meant a 2hr delay, but in Carolina the hint of flurries closed things & caused grocery dashes. Folks handled hurricane warnings with mixed responses, though. Some people shrugged; others told of the time the warning led to crisis.  

So, I guess my vote is to pull the differences that are little threads.  Those are what always stand out to me and friends who move incessantly.

Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: jenklein on January 30, 2012, 03:03 PM
I was in 9th grade when my parents moved our family from Ann Arbor, Michigan to Hendersonville, North Carolina.  I was horrified.  My first day of high school (because, to make matters worse, we'd moved in the middle of the year), I didn't understand what people were saying to me.  The accents were thick -- at least to me -- and I literally couldn't understand.  I felt like people thought I was stupid because I had to think back through what they'd said before I answered.  I had never heard of sweet tea or corn-dogs before, and thought they were both disgusting (I have since become a sweet tea convert).  I was mocked for using the word, "pop."  In NC, if you ask for a Coke, it could just as easily mean Sprite or Diet Pepsi.  I thought the word "Tarheel" was funny and had no idea what it meant.  I got called a Yankee.  Other kids were nice, but they were also curious.  My mother was the second female doctor in the city and everyone was shocked that my father was a house-spouse.

This has changed since then -- in fact, my year may have been the last -- but Gun & Hunter Safety was still being taught when I arrived.  In fact, on my second day of high school in North Carolina, I was taught to shoot a gun in the gym.  With blanks (I assume).  

Now, I love being from the south and I definitely consider myself to be a North Carolinian and not a Michigander... but at 13 years old, I was terrified and angry and angst-ridden.    
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: literaticat on January 30, 2012, 03:07 PM

"Up North" in most of Minnesota means something wildly different than in the South or in other places. Up North in MN usually means Northern MN, and sometimes means: anywhere north of where you live in the state. So obviously, when someone in MN talks about up north, what they are talking about depends on the person and the area in the state they are from.

Haha yes in San Francisco, everyone says "down south" and means LA... Los Angeles. It took me a long time to understand that (I couldn't figure out why SO MANY people would go to Louisiana or Mississippi for just a concert, baseball game or long weekend!)

I think TV and cable have really erased a lot of regional eccentricity, to be honest, especially among the higher income brackets.  When I was a kid growing up in Southern California, I would visit my cousins in rural Louisiana. While they were often a bit behind in terms of fashion and such compared to NYC or LA, even back then in the dark ages of the 90's they were devoted followers of pop culture. They very often had much less of the thick french-pecan-pie Cajun accent of their parents, and they all were very connected with the popular music, TV and movies that everyone else in America watched -- and they also ALL were dying to leave and go to college in California!  (I ended up going to college in New Orleans - I think THEY all went to UCLA!)  

Also -- even in Louisiana the accents vary wildly. Where my family is from there is a Cajun accent. The New Orleans  accent, though, can often be mistaken for Brooklyn -- it is VERY VERY VERY different from Col. Sanders. ;-)
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Lill on January 30, 2012, 03:08 PM
The yes ma'am/sir  no ma'am/sir thing ... it's considered polite in the south ... but can be viewed as anything from strange to overly formal to rude by northerners. I've heard people from the north complain about it when they were transferred south.

I've heard people outside of the south say the south is slower and more relaxed.

The fact that racism or civil war type loyalties still exist could be a surprise to some.

Regional foods/slang/accents/customs.

A difference in religion. For example, in most of the Georgia I know a Lutheran is an exotic creature ... nobody knows quite what one is ... however in Minnesota or Wisconsin they'd be a dime a dozen. When I lived in Nebraska, there were enough Catholics that serving fish in the schools during Lent was common ... however Baptist churches, particularly those identified as Southern Baptist were hard to find. At least that was so in my area.

Someone else mentioned weather and insects ... those things could be a shock to someone not used to the south .. just as I had to adjust to a whole new climate when I moved North.

I do not know about the Jekyll Island area ... but in the parts of Georgia with which I'm familiar ... family ties, number of generations in the area, land ownership are all important ... as in "Are you one of the Petersons from Hawkinsville?"  Someone from a more urban area, who has no agricultural background could find that odd. Since you've grown up in the Deep South, you are probably familiar with people still being tied to the ol' home place ... if such still exists.

Boiled peanuts, fried green tomatoes, okra, bacon or lard cooked with beans, eating the turnip greens instead of the turnip roots, Brunswick stew ... those might all be odd or different from someone who has never experienced the Deep South.

Southerners reactions to extremely cold weather ... or a very rare snowfall would also baffle someone who has always been from the North.

And the obsession with football might be a huge surprise to someone who comes from a more urban type environment.

Also, I've found northerners to be surprised at how in the South people wave or speak to perfect strangers when out and about. That too may vary by area.

Those are some of the things I think would stick out. Hope that helps.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: DonnaE on January 30, 2012, 03:09 PM
 I am a NOrth Carolina gal through and through... and I love Melissa's description of my home state. That's all I have to add to this thread. Everyone else has given you great feedback already! :)

I concur on the anti-cliche vote AND on the big differences being rural v uban not N v S.  

However, I grew up rural Pennsylvania & moved then after college to NC for 7 years. I was in Carolina for all of two weeks before I took a job at a local diner & then a couple months later moved to a biker bar.  When I went home to PA, the biggest thing I noticed was a) accents/regional slang and b) manners.  All thru Carolina, the default was polite: drivers were more courteous; strangers opened doors. "Ma'am" and "thank you" and "Do you mind" were all through people's sentences.  Oh, and Coca-Cola/Co-Cola/Coke meant the same as "pop" and "soda."  No, the food was not all fried in the South, but there were def regional cuisines.  Pig pickins, awesome local diners, BBQ to die for, & OMFG good pies were all over--but I couldn't find what I considered a good pizza or Philly anywhere whereas in PA/NJ they were all over. Kudzu. I was enthralled by it when I first came South. I found that it was a slower pace for pretty much every repairman or mechanic I encountered during those 7 years (which meant that I was downright baffled when I moved to SoCal after the South). The tea, oh! The tea in the South is so much better--sweet like it should be.

Yankee imports who moved down after I'd been there a while always commented on how slow things got done, & when I went home I grumbled about how fast everyone wanted things.

There were more country stations--classic & "new country"--as well as great local music joints where true Blues can be found, which was lacking in the North.  Back home, I found new classic rock bands all over, but the Blues bars were definitely easier to find in the South.

The weather in NC is so amazing that sometimes I swore I could taste flowers from how humid the air is, and on the coast, I still catch myself licking my lips for that salty air. The beaches in the North, California, Pac NW, Ireland, & Scotland don't give me that urge. . . kinda like the South in the Fall never gives me that need-to-inhale bc of woodsmoke & fallen leaves scent.

Response to snow was a biggie.  I'd moved out of an area where 6inches of snow meant a 2hr delay, but in Carolina the hint of flurries closed things & caused grocery dashes. Folks handled hurricane warnings with mixed responses, though. Some people shrugged; others told of the time the warning led to crisis.  

So, I guess my vote is to pull the differences that are little threads.  Those are what always stand out to me and friends who move incessantly.


Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Lill on January 30, 2012, 03:17 PM
And another thing .. since your setting is Jekyll Island ... there may be things that outsiders wouldn't realize about a vacation/resort/ type town. For example, where I live on the Texas coast there is some resentment toward tourists. People want things to stay the same and they don't want to give up driving down the beach just so some big resort hotel can be built for the tourists. Also, Spring Break is kind of like blizzard season for us. You have to make sure you have all your groceries and stuff in the house .. because getting out around town during those weeks is a major pain. But I have seen things like middle aged sales clerks be very motherly to the barely shirted young men who walk in to buy beer. "Y'all enjoy your visit, but be careful."

Of course, I haven't been to Jekyll in probably over 20 years, so I don't know how different it is from my coastal town.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Melissa on January 30, 2012, 03:54 PM
Also having grown up rural North, I was used to fields of wheat, hay, & corn, but I'd never seen tobacco or cotton.   I'd also never been to a farmers market & found sack of peanuts that I could take home & roast myself.  Visiting Georgia in peach season struck me too. (Much like citrus in CA did when I moved there.) Local fresh produce tastes sweeter. When I visited Georgia in peach season, I had so many varieties of peach dishes that I totally over ate.

Finding the beaches so deserted "off season" seemed odd to me too. I'd visit the coast in the winter too (still do) bc the beach is (to me) about the sound/scent/sight, not getting in the water. Both in the South & in SoCal, I prefer the beach in the winter, but up in Rhode Island, the beach in winter is too cold to enjoy (IMO).

I am a NOrth Carolina gal through and through... and I love Melissa's description of my home state.

:) I guess it's a little obvious that I fell in love with the state, isn't it? We talk regularly about going back, & I visit friends there.  Much like California & Oregon, there's something incredible about a state with such personality that's also in possession of both ocean & mountains. . .
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Liz Straw on January 30, 2012, 03:57 PM
I went to Walmart today to pick up a couple of things.  As I was checking out the young woman was telling me how she bought her young son a big frog (stuffed) for Valentines Day.  He was apparently sitting in one of those grocery "carts" that have the two toddler seats in front with the steering wheels.

Her comment to me was that he had to put the frog in the seat of the "buggy" next to him.

I couldn't help but grin and ask her if she was from the south.  She was from Kentucky, more than likely one of the more rural area.

To me a buggy is what you put a baby in, not groceries or the things you buy in a big box store.  Those are called carts.

However after living in Tennessee for 20 years I learned to use the term buggy when I needed a cart and there weren't any around.  

I think the biggest difference, IMHO, is going to be the language you use.  To some it is still the War of Northern Aggression, probably not to a 17 yo, but there are older people and the Sons of the Confederacy that may use this.

If you go to your local library and look at the old issues of Discovery Girls, the feature girls from a different state in each issue.  The girls are younger, but it tells what is "hot" in their state and does give some regional background.  

 
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Barbara Etlin on January 30, 2012, 08:58 PM
I don't know. Ask The Beach Boys. They seem to have a theory... ;-)
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: MysteryRobin on January 30, 2012, 09:11 PM
Woods - where are you from? Are you Southern? I'd personally pick one place I knew really well, then research the other. So if you're Southern or have spent a lot of time there and feel comfortable writing about a girl from the south (and yes, I know it varies wildly, even within the south) then maybe pick a city in the north and write a character who would live there. What I'd do, if you're looking for a fish out of water story, is to create a character who would clash with the people she is going to live with in the south. If her southern family is very religious and proper - make her a Wiccan from Seattle that doesn't know people get offended if you don't use forks (not that all those 3 things *have* to go together, but in one girl they totally could). I'd look more at creating conflict, than stereotypes, then just look at geography to say "does it make sense that this person comes from Portland or Spokane, or what have you."
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Verla Kay on January 31, 2012, 03:50 AM
I've been a north-western girl for all of my life and I can tell you flat out that I LOVE fried foods -- and so does everyone else around me.  I second everyone's suggestions to simply concentrate on your southern girls, their wants, needs, desires and habits. Each person who reads your story will bring their own conceptions of what it is like in the south to the story. Let those who have different traditions, speech, favorite foods, etc. be surprised and delighted by the way your characters live and behave.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: andracill on January 31, 2012, 07:22 AM
I must admit, this is fascinating reading.  In CO, we never think about the North or the South -- I've never heard anyone say they lived 'up north' or 'down south.'  I think we might be a tad insular -- our big expressions are things like 'Western slope,' 'in the mountains,' 'in the foothills,' or 'in the city' (which refers to Denver, of course).  I need the munching popcorn smilie while I read through all this.  :)

P.S.  Which probably punctuates the point that if you're writing about a specific setting which will impact the story, it simply needs to be a place you understand (without worrying about how others perceive it) -- and realize too that unless someone else lives there, they won't notice little mistakes (if there even are any).
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Woods on February 01, 2012, 12:54 PM
I concur on the anti-cliche vote AND on the big differences being rural v uban not N v S.  

However, I grew up rural Pennsylvania & moved then after college to NC for 7 years. I was in Carolina for all of two weeks before I took a job at a local diner & then a couple months later moved to a biker bar.  When I went home to PA, the biggest thing I noticed was a) accents/regional slang and b) manners.  All thru Carolina, the default was polite: drivers were more courteous; strangers opened doors. "Ma'am" and "thank you" and "Do you mind" were all through people's sentences.  Oh, and Coca-Cola/Co-Cola/Coke meant the same as "pop" and "soda."  No, the food was not all fried in the South, but there were def regional cuisines.  Pig pickins, awesome local diners, BBQ to die for, & OMFG good pies were all over--but I couldn't find what I considered a good pizza or Philly anywhere whereas in PA/NJ they were all over. Kudzu. I was enthralled by it when I first came South. I found that it was a slower pace for pretty much every repairman or mechanic I encountered during those 7 years (which meant that I was downright baffled when I moved to SoCal after the South). The tea, oh! The tea in the South is so much better--sweet like it should be.

Yankee imports who moved down after I'd been there a while always commented on how slow things got done, & when I went home I grumbled about how fast everyone wanted things.

There were more country stations--classic & "new country"--as well as great local music joints where true Blues can be found, which was lacking in the North.  Back home, I found new classic rock bands all over, but the Blues bars were definitely easier to find in the South.

The weather in NC is so amazing that sometimes I swore I could taste flowers from how humid the air is, and on the coast, I still catch myself licking my lips for that salty air. The beaches in the North, California, Pac NW, Ireland, & Scotland don't give me that urge. . . kinda like the South in the Fall never gives me that need-to-inhale bc of woodsmoke & fallen leaves scent.

Response to snow was a biggie.  I'd moved out of an area where 6inches of snow meant a 2hr delay, but in Carolina the hint of flurries closed things & caused grocery dashes. Folks handled hurricane warnings with mixed responses, though. Some people shrugged; others told of the time the warning led to crisis.  

So, I guess my vote is to pull the differences that are little threads.  Those are what always stand out to me and friends who move incessantly.



I was in 9th grade when my parents moved our family from Ann Arbor, Michigan to Hendersonville, North Carolina.  I was horrified.  My first day of high school (because, to make matters worse, we'd moved in the middle of the year), I didn't understand what people were saying to me.  The accents were thick -- at least to me -- and I literally couldn't understand.  I felt like people thought I was stupid because I had to think back through what they'd said before I answered.  I had never heard of sweet tea or corn-dogs before, and thought they were both disgusting (I have since become a sweet tea convert).  I was mocked for using the word, "pop."  In NC, if you ask for a Coke, it could just as easily mean Sprite or Diet Pepsi.  I thought the word "Tarheel" was funny and had no idea what it meant.  I got called a Yankee.  Other kids were nice, but they were also curious.  My mother was the second female doctor in the city and everyone was shocked that my father was a house-spouse.

This has changed since then -- in fact, my year may have been the last -- but Gun & Hunter Safety was still being taught when I arrived.  In fact, on my second day of high school in North Carolina, I was taught to shoot a gun in the gym.  With blanks (I assume).  

Now, I love being from the south and I definitely consider myself to be a North Carolinian and not a Michigander... but at 13 years old, I was terrified and angry and angst-ridden.    

The yes ma'am/sir  no ma'am/sir thing ... it's considered polite in the south ... but can be viewed as anything from strange to overly formal to rude by northerners. I've heard people from the north complain about it when they were transferred south.

I've heard people outside of the south say the south is slower and more relaxed.

The fact that racism or civil war type loyalties still exist could be a surprise to some.

Regional foods/slang/accents/customs.

A difference in religion. For example, in most of the Georgia I know a Lutheran is an exotic creature ... nobody knows quite what one is ... however in Minnesota or Wisconsin they'd be a dime a dozen. When I lived in Nebraska, there were enough Catholics that serving fish in the schools during Lent was common ... however Baptist churches, particularly those identified as Southern Baptist were hard to find. At least that was so in my area.

Someone else mentioned weather and insects ... those things could be a shock to someone not used to the south .. just as I had to adjust to a whole new climate when I moved North.

I do not know about the Jekyll Island area ... but in the parts of Georgia with which I'm familiar ... family ties, number of generations in the area, land ownership are all important ... as in "Are you one of the Petersons from Hawkinsville?"  Someone from a more urban area, who has no agricultural background could find that odd. Since you've grown up in the Deep South, you are probably familiar with people still being tied to the ol' home place ... if such still exists.

Boiled peanuts, fried green tomatoes, okra, bacon or lard cooked with beans, eating the turnip greens instead of the turnip roots, Brunswick stew ... those might all be odd or different from someone who has never experienced the Deep South.

Southerners reactions to extremely cold weather ... or a very rare snowfall would also baffle someone who has always been from the North.

And the obsession with football might be a huge surprise to someone who comes from a more urban type environment.

Also, I've found northerners to be surprised at how in the South people wave or speak to perfect strangers when out and about. That too may vary by area.

Those are some of the things I think would stick out. Hope that helps.


These were exactly the kind of answers I was looking for!  :excited:

Today I went and talked to a few friend whom are from the north. We were talking about how northern and southern people pronounce words differently. For example, she said people from Michigan pronounce water WAT-ter while in the Deep South people pronounce it wa-TER.

And yes, we call shopping carts "buggies."

And by fried food, I meant food such as fried pickles, fried squash, friend green tomatoes, fried seafood, and--yes--we do fry our Oreos sometimes.

I attempt to stay away from all this fried goodness and shop regularly at our local health market. :biggrin:

What about the landscaping and general nature of the Deep South? One of my most favorite things about Savannah is the oak trees with the Spanish moss and the marsh.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Vijaya on February 01, 2012, 02:19 PM
Well, I'm a new transplant to Charleston, SC and I love it all -- the weather, the food, the people, the grand oaks and moss and marshes. I don't like the mosquitos and palmetto bugs. I think even though I grew up in India and am a NW girl like Verla, at heart I'm quite Southern. Go figure. I was home the moment I stepped into Stella Maris.

I'll say this much about stories -- it's in the specifics that you can show the universality. So make your characters unique, and don't rely on any northern stereotype. We come in all different shades.

Best of luck with your writing. Vijaya
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Lill on February 01, 2012, 06:50 PM
grits

Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Woods on February 02, 2012, 04:51 AM
Well, I'm a new transplant to Charleston, SC and I love it all -- the weather, the food, the people, the grand oaks and moss and marshes. I don't like the mosquitos and palmetto bugs. I think even though I grew up in India and am a NW girl like Verla, at heart I'm quite Southern. Go figure. I was home the moment I stepped into Stella Maris.

I'll say this much about stories -- it's in the specifics that you can show the universality. So make your characters unique, and don't rely on any northern stereotype. We come in all different shades.

Charleston is definitely a great place. :) I'm glad you feel at home.

grits



Oh, and I forgot to mention. There is one thing I don't like about the Savannah area, and it's that one thing only:

The sand gnats!
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Jan Fields on February 02, 2012, 05:32 AM
I grew up in the South but had my first fried Oreo in Connecticut!

One thing folks noted when moving from North to South that might be worthwhile. In the South (where I'm from) folks will talk to ANYONE...so (on the surface) it looks really super friendly when you first come in because everyone talks to you (briefly) and seems really friendly and nice and quick to lend a hand. But there is also a certain insular quality that although folks are friendly-ish, they don't really open up and BE friends until they're sure of you. I find it kinda opposite up here in New England. No one is rushed to talk to me when I moved here and even the librarians seemed downright surly. But folks didn't need nearly as much interaction to actually become your REAL friend...where they don't act like you're the friendly alien visiting.

Also, another thing folks moving to the area mentioned was the touching. Southerners (where I'm from/NC Mountains-- Hendersonville, actually) generally touch each other a lot...and very casually.

And the accent in the South can be very confusing depending upon where the person is from in the North. I had to act as a translator sometimes for my pastor who was from MN. He had a terrible time with the really true local accent.

Also, kids/teens don't call adults by their first names as easily as they seem to do up here. Down South, even an ADULT man doesn't lightly call a woman over 60 by her first name without invitation (something else that tended to create issues with our new pastor, he called everyone by their first name right after meeting them and offended the heck out of a lot of the older ladies.)

Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: jenklein on February 02, 2012, 08:18 AM


... (where I'm from/NC Mountains-- Hendersonville, actually)...



I bet we know some of the same people, Jan!
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Jan Fields on February 02, 2012, 10:49 AM
Too bad I was kidnapped and hauled to New England...we could hang out.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Jaina on February 02, 2012, 10:59 AM
I was born in NC and have lived here for forty years and even my experience is different than other North Carolinians in this thread saying "we do this" and "we don't do that." 

There are a zillion different factors--what part of the state you live in, sure, but also your "social class" (if I can put it that way), how much formal education your or your family has, whether or not your parents or other family members are native to the state, where you lived (city, country, somewhere in-between), what school you attended, race, religion, etc.

I guess there are common threads that run through regions but I don't like generalizations.  I AM a North Carolinian (I love my state!) and have always been annoyed when people said I'm not "typical" because I don't meet their personal stereotype.  I've heard this all my life--all around the world.  North Carolina is a lot of things.

Go 'heels.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: DonnaE on February 02, 2012, 11:14 AM
Hi Jaina- GO MOUNTAINEERS! ;) YOSEF rocks. :)

I hope you "some of us do this..." in my post. I am so with you and understand that we are all different. A good friend of mine is from the mountains. Deep in the mountains. Her family and those around her family had much different customs than my family (I'm from the sandhills area). Another friend of mine is closer to the coast. Their food choices, way of speaking and general lifestyle differs much from mine, too.

And some of my friends, especially those around the durham/raleigh area, don't have any type of "twang" to their voices. I do.

And my kids, who are all being raised in the city, think the "country" is a great place to visit. They want to live there and talk about it as if it is some sort of foreign country.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Jaina on February 02, 2012, 11:20 AM
I hear you.  As proof our state is awesome, I present the Soda vs. Pop map.

https://tastyresearch.files.wordpress.com/2006/10/popvssodamap.png

Just LOOK at that beautiful range of colors over NC.  We are so diverse!

Okay, I guess I have to hand it to Virginia and Nevada, too.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Liz Straw on February 02, 2012, 11:26 AM
When I first moved to Tennessee in 1986, I thought the funniest question that many people asked me was "whose your daddy?"  

The first time I heard the question I am sure I had a very peculiar look on my face!  :shrug:

I soon learned to answer, you wouldn't know him, he lives in Indiana.  

Ten years later this question was seldom asked by most people.

I always loved it when people asked me if I wanted a Coke and I answered "yes."  They would look at me like I was crazy (I knew the question was asking me what type of POP I wanted.)  There next question would always be, "Well what kind do you want?"  I would smile and say "A Coke, please."

I would always get the question when I traveled through the state and talked to groups "Where was I from?"  Obviously I had a midwestern (normal) accent.  I would answer Nashville.  Eventually someone would catch on and ask me where I was raised and I would tell them Indiana.  

Yes, I loved to play mind games on some people.  :tongue2
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Liz Straw on February 02, 2012, 11:32 AM
Oh my, I forgot, "NO GRITS, NO GRAVY"

Very popular in the south and not in the north are Meat and three restaurants.  Ate at them all the time while traveling across the state.  You could choose to get the meat of the day with three vegetables or get a vegie plate.  I never did take to sweet tea. 

Lots of places used to sell and probably still do clothing with G.R.I.T.S. on them Girls Raised in The South.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Asnodgrass on February 02, 2012, 12:59 PM
Just a note about my husbands grandmother who was a Georgia peach. She moved to Texas from Georgia as a teen and she passed away in her 90's a couple of years ago.

She had dementia, but even when she didn't know a whole lot, she'd always tell me that she was a Georgia peach. She was quite a fabulous character.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Liz Straw on February 02, 2012, 06:25 PM
There's a diference between deep south and southwest.  Also, my mother never made chicken fried steak.  We never had biscuits and gravy.  We did have pan fried pork chops.

I agree with you on there being a big difference between southeastern US and southwestern US. 

Biscuits and gravy are not indigenous to just the south, they eat them here in Indiana also.  I have always hated white gravy, but it was much more prevalent in Tennessee and Georgia.  My mother also used to pan fry pork chops and may still do so. 

I have also lived in New Jersey where I used to eat cream cheese and jelly sandwiches and was broken hearted when we moved back to Indiana when I was 5 to learn that you could not order these at a restaurant. 

The area I lived in Georgia was about 45 miles inland from Jekyll Island.  It was one of the places I went to save my sanity and the one place that someone broke into my car and stole my jeans jacket.  I was so mad at the time. 
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: AnneB on February 02, 2012, 06:48 PM
Philadelphia is not rural NJ (yes, thank you, there is such a thing), is not Bangor, is not *gasp* one of those places in the geographic north that nobody even thinks about, like Milwaukee or Missoula or Fargo or Spokane... Gullah/Geechee culture?)
Hey, I think about Milwaukee all the time...
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: olmue on February 02, 2012, 08:13 PM
Glad you think about Milwaukee, Anne! :) I think about Missoula and Spokane. Alas, I don't think either the publishing industry or Hollywood do, though...at least, not very often.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Lill on February 02, 2012, 08:38 PM
My brother just reminded me of the joys of mush ... I believe that's a midwestern thing. My family  was from central Ohio.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Helen on February 03, 2012, 02:27 AM
I'd forgotten about mush.....swirling with butter and maple syrup......my mother recycled it later and  sliced it....fried in butter.....key word....fried. 
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Liz Straw on February 03, 2012, 03:08 PM
WhTs interesting about foods is that very similar foods exist ib different cultures --often the cheap foods that can feed a family.  Mush is an awful lot like polenta.  I'm not a fan but I did not grow up in an area where this was served.
I love mush, don't eat it much now.  Teehee, I love the comment about being a lot like polenta.  My friend and I were ask to dinner once and they served polenta.  I had not heard of polenta before, and when we saw it and tasted it, we went "Oh this is a lot like mush."  Our one host was from Germany and found the comparison to the word mush very offensive at first until we and his wife (from Tennessee) explained what mush was and how it was made.  He was slightly appeased, but we did not use the word mush again that evening. LOL
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: DonnaE on February 03, 2012, 03:47 PM
We call it Liver Pudding. SOOOO good when it is fried up. Oh - and put it between toast some fried eggs.

I'm hungry.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Lill on February 03, 2012, 04:05 PM
 Scribblegirl, we started out with it fried. For breakfast. Then you put the syrup on it. Mom would make it and store it in a deep squarish plastic container and then slice it off as needed. Yes, Stephanie, much like polenta.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Anne Marie on February 03, 2012, 04:14 PM
Isn't mush different from liver pudding?  Mush is just boiled cornmeal.  Liver pudding has meat in it.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: DonnaE on February 03, 2012, 06:40 PM
I don't really know. My hubby calls it "liver mush" and I call it "liver pudding". We are from different parts of NC. :) But what we buy has meat in it. Mystery meat. :)

Here is the wikipedia def: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Livermush 
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Lill on February 03, 2012, 06:51 PM
My mush ain't got no meat in it.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Jaina on February 03, 2012, 06:51 PM
Had no idea what you guys were talking about with all the mush, polenta, liver pudding talk, but when I saw that picture at the link above, I immediately thought "scrapple."  But it isn't really, is it?  Regardless, I don't think I'll be eating any . . .
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: DonnaE on February 03, 2012, 07:53 PM
I've had scrapple. Very similar. Probably the same thing. It's usually a little spicier than the liver pudding/mush I've had. But still really, really good. We usually find scrapple in TN and VA, but no liver pudding/mush.

I won't make you eat it if you come and visit. Honest. :)
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Lill on February 03, 2012, 08:13 PM
This is what I know as mush.
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/fried-cornmeal-mush/
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: DonnaE on February 03, 2012, 09:10 PM
That looks more like cornbread to me, but def not the liver mush that I'm used to! :)
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: MaryWitzl on February 04, 2012, 04:14 AM
From my own observations (of Southern aunts and uncles who used to come out to see us), Southerners tend to be friendlier and better at establishing links with neighbors. And I know it's a stereotype, but I swear they all talked much more slowly, and used more 'pleases' and 'thank yous'.  They had a better sense of community too; when we visited our cousins in the Panhandle of Florida, they knew ALL their neighbors. I remember being horrified when my uncle offered a kid down the block a ride to school. We were all in the car, so it wasn't like he was doing something creepy -- but it just wasn't DONE in California to offer another kid a lift to school, unless you were best friends. 

As for food, my aunt kept a massive bottle of pickled pigs' feet in the garage; she saved the 'drippings' from any meat she cooked (to spread on bread -- always Wonder bread -- never wholemeal -- or cook vegetables with), and we grew up on cornbread, black-eyed peas, collard greens, turnips, and banana pudding. Nobody else in the neighborhood ate those things -- just us. And no summer was summer without plenty of iced tea, with lemon and sugar.

My mother said they used to scramble brains with eggs, for breakfast -- which is so horrible I can hardly stand to write about it. But liver mush?   :reaction
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Woods on February 04, 2012, 05:44 AM
But liver mush?   :reaction

Oh, boy.  :P I can't stand liver mush--not even the smell of it.

Also (especially around the marsh areas) there are a lot of alligators and wild hogs. And raccoons. Those pesky raccoons. . . they're everywhere.  :fury
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Anne Marie on February 04, 2012, 06:13 AM
That looks more like cornbread to me, but def not the liver mush that I'm used to! :)

Cornbread has eggs and butter and milk and leavening; mush is just boiled cornmeal, shaped over night and fried the next day.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Lill on February 04, 2012, 08:10 AM
What Anne Marie said ...

man, I'm getting hungry for mush .. I wonder if my kids would eat it.



Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Juliarts2003@yahoo.com on February 04, 2012, 08:56 AM
This thread is great! I've lived a lot of places (St. Augustine, Chicago, Wisconsin, Colorado, and my home, Indiana) - and the differences are what I love!
 
When I moved to Chicago from Seymour (IN), no one up there had ever heard of Big Red (cream soda) - and I was heartbroken, because I loved it! In Florida I was surprised at the Co-Cola or Coke for any type of pop (which was what we called it in IN & Chicago.) My grandmother (who raised me) always kept an empty Crisco can (they used to be all metal) on the stove to drain the bacon grease into (to be reused to fry up anything and to put on greens or green beans. Pan fried pork chops = YUM! And we always knew all our neighbors and went inside for home-made treats on Halloween! (Oh, Mrs. Nowlin's popcorn balls were to die for!) But - I grew up in a small town and that was normal.

When I moved to CO the western influence was charming! And, yeah... everything was foothills, front range, western slope - but I never got directionally lost because the mountains were always to the west! However, being out in CO last year, I was sad to see that cowboy hats weren't as in vogue as they were when I lived there (in the '70s.)

Cornmeal mush... add some sundried tomatoes and basil and you've got a rockin' gourmet polenta. Kind of like Pygmalion! ;)
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: MaryWitzl on February 04, 2012, 10:25 AM
My mother's recipe book included instructions on how to skin and cook opossums. I still get weak in the knees remembering it.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: AnneB on February 04, 2012, 02:06 PM
Ahem. Possum is not just for old cookbooks. My Joy of Cooking has a recipe for 'possum in the back of the Game section. If possible, trap 'possum and feed it on milk and cereals for 10 days before killing. Clean but do not skin... Unclear what a possum's cereal of preference is: I'm guessing you couldn't go wrong with Lucky Charms or Trix.

Also recipes for  :whitebunny, raccoon, bear, woodchuck, :moose und squirrel. I could eat out of our backyard! Except for the bear part. Which is OK because Irma & Marion say black bear isn't very good (unless it's 1795 and your name is Crockett).
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Liz Straw on February 04, 2012, 06:34 PM
My mush ain't got no meat in it.

mine neither!
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Liz Straw on February 04, 2012, 06:39 PM
Ahem. Possum is not just for old cookbooks. My Joy of Cooking has a recipe for 'possum in the back of the Game section. If possible, trap 'possum and feed it on milk and cereals for 10 days before killing. Clean but do not skin... Unclear what a possum's cereal of preference is: I'm guessing you couldn't go wrong with Lucky Charms or Trix.


You mean I could have eaten those suckers my one dog used to kill in the back yard!  :ahh YUCK, I think digging a hole in the alleyway and burying them was the better thing to do.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: DonnaE on February 04, 2012, 06:58 PM

My mother said they used to scramble brains with eggs, for breakfast -- which is so horrible I can hardly stand to write about it. But liver mush?   :reaction

It is true.

My Aunt Bea did a sneaky thing. (And yes, she was really my Aunt Bea.)  
She scrambled the two ingredients together and gave it to us to eat.
THEN... after we'd eaten most of it... she told us what it was.

We. Were. HORRIFIED.

I still am.

And last year, I was at an authentic mexican restaurant with my friend, Rocio. I ordered my darling' daughters what I thought was "soft tacos". (I didn't really look at he name of the dish - but the english description had the term "soft meat" in it). I assumed I was doing something good.

But when I did, my sweet friend took pity on me and immediately stopped me, spoke quickly in spanish to the waitress and shook her head at me.

Apparently, I'd ordered a taco filled with BRAINS. yes. Brains. I had NO idea! Of course, had I paid more attention in my spanish class, I would have realized that the term "cabeza" refers to head.

Duh. DOnna.

My friend told me that the waitress had already written down the order of what she thought I had MEANT to order.. and she knew it wasn't the brainy tacos. She was right!

She was a fantastic waitress and got a VERY good tip! :)

(and my friend hasn't let me forget it!)
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Beth on February 22, 2012, 06:39 AM
As a northerner, here is what I have noticed:

-I spent an extended time in an urban area in the south, though not the deep south. People tended to move more slowly. Checking out at the grocery store took much longer than it does in New England. (I went to different chains in different cities, and this was pretty universal.)
-When visiting relatives in a rural area (again, not in the deep south) guns/hunting was much more prevalent. All of the kids said ma'am and sir, and people were generally focused on being courteous.
-I spent a couple of days with a group of college kids from a TX college. I'm not sure where they grew up - presumably they were from different areas - but based on accents they were mostly from the south. The girls seemed a little more focused on guys/relationships and getting married than my friends from home. They guys seemed more apt to be chivalrous. Funny story: At one point, one young man wanted to help me across a little stream (we were all on a hike). I declined, and he insisted on "spotting" me in case I fell. I had to fight feeling insulted and annoyed, but I knew he was trying to be considerate and kind so I forced a smile and said "thank you." I am confident that he wasn't trying to come on to me. I was with my boyfriend at the time - who was also from the north and knew better than to imply that I couldn't rock hop without help. The TX guys actually seemed pretty shocked that my boyfriend wasn't helping me out.
-Some people in the south really do seem to still be fighting the civil war and dislike "Yankees." I met many, many more people who were friendly and polite and delightful to speak with, but I was surprised to run into any anti-Yankee sentiment. 

Of course, there are certainly plenty of people that "break" any stereotype / generality. YMMV.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Woods on March 09, 2012, 04:33 AM
As a northerner, here is what I have noticed:

-I spent an extended time in an urban area in the south, though not the deep south. People tended to move more slowly. Checking out at the grocery store took much longer than it does in New England. (I went to different chains in different cities, and this was pretty universal.)
-When visiting relatives in a rural area (again, not in the deep south) guns/hunting was much more prevalent. All of the kids said ma'am and sir, and people were generally focused on being courteous.
-I spent a couple of days with a group of college kids from a TX college. I'm not sure where they grew up - presumably they were from different areas - but based on accents they were mostly from the south. The girls seemed a little more focused on guys/relationships and getting married than my friends from home. They guys seemed more apt to be chivalrous. Funny story: At one point, one young man wanted to help me across a little stream (we were all on a hike). I declined, and he insisted on "spotting" me in case I fell. I had to fight feeling insulted and annoyed, but I knew he was trying to be considerate and kind so I forced a smile and said "thank you." I am confident that he wasn't trying to come on to me. I was with my boyfriend at the time - who was also from the north and knew better than to imply that I couldn't rock hop without help. The TX guys actually seemed pretty shocked that my boyfriend wasn't helping me out.
-Some people in the south really do seem to still be fighting the civil war and dislike "Yankees." I met many, many more people who were friendly and polite and delightful to speak with, but I was surprised to run into any anti-Yankee sentiment.  

Of course, there are certainly plenty of people that "break" any stereotype / generality. YMMV.

Hi Elyse,

Great, detailed answer. Everyone's answers are helping me a lot. Thank you!

Quick question: How notorious are SCADS? Have anyone not in the Georgia area heard of them before? If you say SCADS in Georgia people automatically know who you're referring to. But what about other parts of the country?

 :eh2 They're probably a few people scratching their head right now, wondering what I'm talking about. SCADS stands for Savannah College of Art and Design Students.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Jaina on March 09, 2012, 04:43 AM
Nope, sorry.  But I have heard of that school.  I think I saw a sign or something when I went to Savannah once.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Anne Marie on March 09, 2012, 04:50 AM
I know someone who attended that school but I don't know that nickname.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Abracabarbara on March 09, 2012, 05:39 AM
Woods,

I'm in NJ.

My senior daughter has had LOTS of promo-material and phone calls from SCAD. They had reps come to her art classes and have pursued her.

I know most of the art colleges in the country and SCAD is very well known in the art communities in the US.

I know a hand full of kids from our high school in NJ who go there and love it.

It also stands for SCAD: Sentimental, Condescending, Anthropomorphic and Didactic in the It's a Bunny-Eat-Bunny World Book. ;}
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: LeslieG on March 09, 2012, 10:22 AM
I know of them from having been in animation and from helping research art schools for my daughter, but never knew their acronym.  I don't think it's as widely-known an acronym as, say, RISD.
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Woods on March 12, 2012, 05:28 AM


My senior daughter has had LOTS of promo-material and phone calls from SCAD. They had reps come to her art classes and have pursued her.


Wow, AE, that's amazing! Your daughter must be extremely talented. What kind of art does she do?
Title: Re: Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?
Post by: Lill on March 12, 2012, 07:52 AM
I lived in Georgia for over 30 years. Never heard of SCADS.