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Writing, Illustrating & Publishing => Illustrating => Topic started by: evilrobot on July 25, 2012, 09:09 AM

Title: Double page spreads????
Post by: evilrobot on July 25, 2012, 09:09 AM
I'm in the planning stage working out a new dummy book sample for my portfolio. I'm trying to cover all the areas where my current portfolio is lacking. I was wondering a few things. Does anyone have advice on setting up a double page spread. Not sure how to handle the gutter in the middle I know I don't want anything important in that area but are there any tricks or advice on how someone handles their spreads as far as setup goes I'm using Photoshop to set up my templates, formatting, and I do all the illustration in Corel Painter.

Also I've been drawing most of my samples at 8" x 10" is there a common size I should be drawing these at?

When I'm drawing samples is it better if I make up my own little stories and illustrate them or would I have better luck if I used a well known story like The Three Little Pigs or Little Red Riding Hood to draw as samples.

Thanks.
Title: Re: Double page spreads????
Post by: Artemesia on July 25, 2012, 09:21 AM
I think 8x10 is fine. There is not really a one size standard, but there are a few different sizes that are common. Look at all the different sized PBs in the library or book store.

As for a double page spread, in PBs depending on the binding method, you'll have one or two "natural" double spreads, meaning they will be printed on one continuous page. Pages 16/17 (I think) is usually going to be one whole sheet, so it's a good spot for a double spread. But it's a good idea to make sure faces or anything really important don't fall in the middle. I tend to put double spreads more according to the needs of the story, but you just have to beware that since most of these are printed on two separate sheets and joined in the middle when bound, that the alignment can be off by a couple of millimeters. So again, just design the spread keeping anything important away from the gutter.

If you are a writer, you can definitely make up your own story, but it is quite common for portfolios to use a story in the public domain.

hope that helps!
Title: Re: Double page spreads????
Post by: Julia K. on July 25, 2012, 12:13 PM
One a double page spread in photoshop, I use the blue ruler guides on the side and block out at least 1/4 inches on all outer sides or more to allow for a bleed and in the center,  I put a blue  vertical guide line and on each side of that middle another blue guideline- so there are three vertical lines marking my center gutter.
I think showing a two page spread in a portfolio is less important than showing continuate in charters- at least three illustrations with the same character doing action- from different angles would be a good thing to work on. 
Title: Re: Double page spreads????
Post by: Tatumhart on July 25, 2012, 12:17 PM
Follow up question:

How do I know what is public domain?

I saw someone who illustrated scenes from a Mozart Opera(The Magic Flute). That seems like a fun/different idea if you have permission, I suppose.
Title: Re: Double page spreads????
Post by: Julia K. on July 25, 2012, 12:56 PM
public domain in general is 75 years past the artists death- it changed a little in the 1970's so I usually just say 100 years- so Mozarts Opera's are in the public domain as is story teller like Hans Christian Andersen. ( that saying - you need to create art work much different than a living illustrator obviously)
Title: Re: Double page spreads????
Post by: Artemesia on July 25, 2012, 01:56 PM
there are also a few websites that list stories that are in the public domain. Just google public domain stories for children and you should get a number of sites.
Title: Re: Double page spreads????
Post by: evilrobot on July 25, 2012, 02:01 PM
Some great great feedback so far thank you very much. Julia K. thank you for sharing your layout process and about the characters in different angles. I'm doing a lot of character sketches for this next dummy so I'll have all that worked out before I start this time.