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Writing, Illustrating & Publishing => Illustrating => Topic started by: SarahW on May 23, 2015, 11:03 AM

Title: Question on Illustrating GNs
Post by: SarahW on May 23, 2015, 11:03 AM
In picture books and middle grade novels, generally in trade it is expected that the agent finds someone else to illustrate your work. Even if say any specific artist may have a vastly different interpretation of a work. A darkly gothic style being converted into a twinkly and sugarific style. Is this similar in GNs?

Comics have mostly been indie published over the last few years. Not that DC or Marvel haven't accepted new work, though not in the last ten years or so. I started out as mainly a graphic novel person, it wasn't until later I became more interested in writing prose and poetry.
Title: Re: Question on Illustrating GNs
Post by: Artemesia on May 23, 2015, 03:03 PM
I'm not sure I know exactly what you're asking, but I want to clarify that it is not the agent that finds the illustrator, it is the publisher. I am both writer and illustrator and that is how my agent submits my work, as a package.

I believe for GNs, it might be common enough for a single person to write and do the artwork for indie works, but I think it's always been pretty standard for trade comics and GNs to have a team of artists, and I've seen indies produced that way as well. They all have specialized jobs, like penciler, inker, colorist etc. Though I have seen some, like the Amulet series, that appear to be written and illustrated by a single person.  I really don't know that much about it, but maybe someone else who does will chime in.
Title: Re: Question on Illustrating GNs
Post by: SarahW on May 23, 2015, 04:40 PM
In fact in manga (over in the east) having a writer, an artist, and a team of toners (who often go uncredited) is fairly common place within that field. Not sure why they aren't credited.

So it is the publisher, not the agent. OK that's a little more comforting.
Title: Re: Question on Illustrating GNs
Post by: Artemesia on May 23, 2015, 05:37 PM
I don't know how crediting would go with publishers in Asia, but in the US sometimes artists and even writers go uncredited if they are in-house publishing staff, the same way the designers are usually uncredited or there might be a small credit on the copyright page, but the publisher retains copyright of illustrations or text done by in-house staff. This is pretty common for licensed character books and books that are produced in-house. So it could be that the toner artists you mention are publishing staff, not the creative talent?
Title: Re: Question on Illustrating GNs
Post by: SarahW on May 23, 2015, 05:41 PM
That's a good point, I never considered that possibility.

I'm so used to web comics, it's hard to think about the larger scope sometimes.
Title: Re: Question on Illustrating GNs
Post by: Artemesia on May 23, 2015, 05:47 PM
Also, more clarification. If a person is a writer and not an illustrator, they can send to agents and publishers without illustrations. If they become agented, the agent will submit to publishers without illustrations. If a text is acquired, the publisher will then match the text to an illustrator they think is suited. The writer may or may not be consulted. If a person both writes and is a professional illustrator (emphasis on professional illustrator, it is not advisable to sub illustrations if a person is not), they, or their agent if they have one, can submit text and illustrations to publishers as a package.
Title: Re: Question on Illustrating GNs
Post by: SarahW on May 23, 2015, 06:39 PM
Oh I get this, but how does this effect people pitching graphic novels? I've never pitched a graphic novel, as I'm unsure as to whether to send just a script or script and illustrations.

But yea for just novels, I wouldn't reasonably expect to send in a novel with illustrations.

I am wondering what was up with P.L. Travers, was that just a different time in publishing. Or is British publishing really that different from US publishing? I know she specifically sought out Mary Shepard.

(I read her biography at one point.)
Title: Re: Question on Illustrating GNs
Post by: Artemesia on May 23, 2015, 06:49 PM
Yeah, not sure how pitching a GN works. There are book publishers that are expanding into GNs, like Scholastic's Graphix imprint, but I really don't know how comic and dedicated GN publishers work. It would be interesting to hear if anybody is familiar! My books have been called graphic novel hybrids and were definitely inspired by comics and GNs, and targeted to a younger audience, but I don't consider myself a graphic novelist. I'd love to learn, though.
Title: Re: Question on Illustrating GNs
Post by: SarahW on May 23, 2015, 07:01 PM
That sounds a lot like a light novel, though in Japan (I'm a westerner by the way, just grew up reading eastern stuff) those were generally considered YA: Devil May Cry, Wolf And Cub. Where you might have prose pages, but every so often you'll find a manga styled graphic novel page, or a page with a manga styled illustration.

Something I've always wanted to do myself.