SCBWI's Blueboard - A Message & Chat Board

Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1
Picture Books (PB) / Re: Picture book manuscript Pagination - HELP!
« Last post by Vijaya on Today at 11:48 AM »
Breathe. Deb has given you great advice. I always just write without pagination because it breaks the flow of the story but then I make a dummy to to see how it could be paginated, whether the page turns work, etc. For some projects, editors have asked for pagination and art notes, so I always deliver what is asked. However, when it's a cold submission, I submit the story double spaced. Good luck on your next submission.
2
Picture Books (PB) / Re: Picture book manuscript Pagination - HELP!
« Last post by miia-to on Today at 10:31 AM »
Hi Miia,

First, congrats on doing research and finding blogs that provide helpful information! I'm curious as to the editor who told you to never submit a paginated manuscript? Is it a freelance editor or an editor at a publishing house?

I write picture books. I've submitted many of them. As a rule of thumb, as Carol Hinz said, most authors don't submit paginated manuscripts. However, as she note, she likes to see them that way, as I do know other editors and agents don't seem to mind. But I think the general advice is to NOT paginate them as it might appear you're trying to do the editor or the illustrator's job.

BUT, I think it is very wise for you to  WRITE your story that way. You want to be sure you can envision illustrations on each page spread. It's  a great way to build in great page turns. (I often indicate page turns with an . . .  then a new paragraph.) But most of the time I remove the page numbers before I submit. Occasionally I'll have a story where my agent asks to see the pagination so she could see my vision for the story if she wasn't quite "getting it."

So don't panic. It was just one editor's opinion. Most agents and editors just want an easy to read manuscript and if you submitted it that way, I can't imagine that most care that much. Just be sure that you're willing to be flexible if the book gets acquired - the editor and art director may change things up. They are the experts.

I hope this helps!


Thank you for talking me off the ledge. The editor is freelance but is also a published children's book author, so I figured they knew what they were talking about!

3
Hi Miia,

First, congrats on doing research and finding blogs that provide helpful information! I'm curious as to the editor who told you to never submit a paginated manuscript? Is it a freelance editor or an editor at a publishing house?

I write picture books. I've submitted many of them. As a rule of thumb, as Carol Hinz said, most authors don't submit paginated manuscripts. However, as she note, she likes to see them that way, as I do know other editors and agents don't seem to mind. But I think the general advice is to NOT paginate them as it might appear you're trying to do the editor or the illustrator's job.

BUT, I think it is very wise for you to  WRITE your story that way. You want to be sure you can envision illustrations on each page spread. It's  a great way to build in great page turns. (I often indicate page turns with an . . .  then a new paragraph.) But most of the time I remove the page numbers before I submit. Occasionally I'll have a story where my agent asks to see the pagination so she could see my vision for the story if she wasn't quite "getting it."

So don't panic. It was just one editor's opinion. Most agents and editors just want an easy to read manuscript and if you submitted it that way, I can't imagine that most care that much. Just be sure that you're willing to be flexible if the book gets acquired - the editor and art director may change things up. They are the experts.

I hope this helps!
4
Picture Books (PB) / Picture book manuscript Pagination - HELP!
« Last post by miia-to on Today at 10:08 AM »
Hello all,
I recently submitted a manuscript to a competition. In the manuscript, I paginated the story the way Carol Hinz does here - https://picturebookbuilders.com/2020/02/carol-hintz-talks-about-picture-book-pagination/ and the way Emma Quay did it .
https://emmaquay.com/blog/2018/7/3/how-i-present-a-picture-book-manuscript-to-publishers

I also paginated it according to the example manuscript given by a video uploaded by the competition. The only example they gave that had paragraphs was for a novel.

But today, I got told by an editor that I should NEVER submit a manuscript to an agent or publisher like this.

So now I'm panicking and majorly confused.
I've reviewed past posts in this forum and I am still seeing some debate on whether this was appropriate.

How have you all submitted your picture book manuscripts? Also, how do you format the manuscript into paragraphs, when one paragraph might be only a sentence? 

RANDOM EXAMPLE 1 (with pagination)
[Page 1]
Ducky was a duck that liked to duck.

[Page 2]
One day he met a cat that was very catty.


RANDOM EXAMPLE 2 (without pagination)
Ducky was a duck that liked to duck.
One day he met a cat that was very catty.

Please advise and forgive me for sounding like  a noob.
5
Picture Books (PB) / Re: Grammer rules for picture books
« Last post by miia-to on Yesterday at 08:01 PM »
Even in a band name, the gets lowercased. https://www.britannica.com/topic/the-Who. Chicago lists the Who with the lowercased also. Here's what it actually says, "A the preceding a name, even when part of the official title, is lowercased in running text."

Go for it, but know it may be changed in edits. If your story is great, it's unlikely to lead to a rejection. There is nothing wrong with breaking rules as long as you do it knowingly and have reason. (In this case, to show young readers it's part of the name.)

Thank you for this! Super helpful!
6
Picture Books (PB) / Re: Grammer rules for picture books
« Last post by Debbie Vilardi on Yesterday at 07:00 PM »
Even in a band name, the gets lowercased. https://www.britannica.com/topic/the-Who. Chicago lists the Who with the lowercased also. Here's what it actually says, "A the preceding a name, even when part of the official title, is lowercased in running text."

Go for it, but know it may be changed in edits. If your story is great, it's unlikely to lead to a rejection. There is nothing wrong with breaking rules as long as you do it knowingly and have reason. (In this case, to show young readers it's part of the name.)
7
Picture Books (PB) / Re: Grammer rules for picture books
« Last post by Vijaya on Yesterday at 06:22 AM »
Thank you Vijaya! By the way, do you still take on critique clients?

You're welcome. And yes, although I still take critique clients, I first recommend what Debbie suggests--joining a critique group or posting your story here for critique and critiquing others' work because you learn so much from giving and receiving critiques. It's what is best for you to grow as a writer. Paying for critiques gets expensive. I'd only do it after I'd done everything possible to make it the best story and still need a professional eye.

That's just it though. I wanted the "The" to be part of the proper name. It's the band a villain character. They refer to themselves that way and I want other characters to refer to them that way.

In this case, you would capitalize because it's part of the name, a proper noun.

Laurel has given an excellent site for grammar rules, but I'd also invest in a book if you haven't already. My favorite is Elements of Style by Strunk and White (yes, that EB White of Charlotte's Web). But if in doubt I also refer to Barron's Essentials of English and Hodges' Harbrace Handbook of Grammar.

Happy reading, writing and revising.




8
Picture Books (PB) / Re: Grammer rules for picture books
« Last post by miia-to on December 01, 2020, 07:28 PM »
It would seem odd to do this because "the" is not really part of the proper name. Consider the Empire State building of the Houses of Parliament. (These examples are from the Chicago Manual of Style.)

It is a stylistic choice though. If you have a story reason for doing this, go for it. For example, if "The" is a family name relating The Bogeyman and The Sandman or if the point is to emphasize the word "the," this might make sense.

The best thing to do is often to write the story and then get it critiqued by your critique group or by posting it on the boards.

.

That's just it though. I wanted the "The" to be part of the proper name. It's the band a villain character. They refer to themselves that way and I want other characters to refer to them that way.
9
Picture Books (PB) / Re: Grammer rules for picture books
« Last post by Debbie Vilardi on December 01, 2020, 06:38 PM »
One more question - When referring to a creature such as The Boogeyman or The Sandman, is it ok to keep the  letter T capitalized every time you refer to it in the manuscript? Or is that a no no?


It would seem odd to do this because "the" is not really part of the proper name. Consider the Empire State building of the Houses of Parliament. (These examples are from the Chicago Manual of Style.)

It is a stylistic choice though. If you have a story reason for doing this, go for it. For example, if "The" is a family name relating The Bogeyman and The Sandman or if the point is to emphasize the word "the," this might make sense.

The best thing to do is often to write the story and then get it critiqued by your critique group or by posting it on the boards.

.
10
Picture Books (PB) / Re: Grammer rules for picture books
« Last post by Laurel Gale on December 01, 2020, 06:30 PM »
One more question - When referring to a creature such as The Boogeyman or The Sandman, is it ok to keep the  letter T capitalized every time you refer to it in the manuscript? Or is that a no no?

I would not capitalize the letter T in these situations. (Unless, of course, it occurs at the beginning of a sentence.)

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10