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Writing, Illustrating & Publishing => Research => Topic started by: olmue on May 29, 2013, 11:36 AM

Title: Star position in soccer?
Post by: olmue on May 29, 2013, 11:36 AM
I've asked my decidedly non-sporty male family members, and opinions differ. (Ie, they don't know the names of most positions, anyway.) I've googled and found lots of articles on How to Find the Right Position for You (ie, everybody wins, isn't that wonderful?). I found an article that suggests the center forward makes the most money in Europe. So I just want to confirm with Those in the Know. If you were to have a star position (sorta like how a quarterback is the star of football), would it be the center? (Am I even using that term right?) I have a character who played an excellent position but lost his place on the team because of grades and irresponsible behavior. It would be nice if he was a rising soccer star as opposed to just any random player. Suggestions, O Sporty Writers out there?
Title: Re: Star position in soccer?
Post by: Jaina on May 29, 2013, 11:49 AM
Center forward, I believe, but I wasn't a very GOOD player and only on the team for a year.  The girl who was the star of our team had gone to school where there was no girls' team, so she'd played with the boys.  She was tough and she was GOOD.  And she was either the center forward or the forward on the right side, perhaps--because of which foot she kicked with?

Maybe you should just use whatever position Beckham plays in?
Title: Re: Star position in soccer?
Post by: Jaina on May 29, 2013, 11:52 AM
So I just looked it up (I'm so unsporty--why am I even IN this thread?  I should shut up now!) and Beckham is a midfielder.  Go figure!

But I also looked up Mia Hamm and she's described as a "Forward" only--without it specifying if she was right, left, or center.
Title: Re: Star position in soccer?
Post by: writermutt on May 29, 2013, 11:58 AM
I'm not sure about making $$$, but the center foward is the first person who gets to kick the ball after the other team scores in their goal. (Disclaimer: straight from the mouths of my soccer playing kiddos. I'm just a happy-on-the-sidelines spectator parent, not really knowledgeable on the technical ins and outs.)

I know position-wise, you've got to have a great goalie in the box defending the goal. In rec soccer, I've seen kids jumping up and down, begging to play goalie. Teen girls, not so much.  :) Anyway, everyone either really LOVES or really hates the goalie, it seems.
Title: Re: Star position in soccer?
Post by: writermutt on May 29, 2013, 12:01 PM
Forgot to add, my hubby has coached rec soccer for several yrs, so I'd be happy to ask him later on, too.
Title: Re: Star position in soccer?
Post by: AuntyBooks on May 29, 2013, 12:11 PM
center forward -- also known as striker-- is the glory position. This is the guy or gal who will get the coca-cola commercials and cereal boxes.  :)

eab
Title: Re: Star position in soccer?
Post by: olmue on May 29, 2013, 12:15 PM
Thanks, everyone! Center forward it is!
Title: Re: Star position in soccer?
Post by: writermutt on May 29, 2013, 10:45 PM
That's great, olmue! After asking my hubby about this, just wanted to add that he says while any position can have a break-out star, center forward/striker or goalie are the typical glory, superstar positions.

I, too, have soccer featured in my WIP. I'm always asking him soccer questions.  :)
Title: Re: Star position in soccer?
Post by: olmue on May 30, 2013, 07:00 AM
Well, my husband said some kind of offense, my 12YO said goalie, and my 15YO hedged and said he had no idea. So I'm glad to hear that there's a bit of glory for the goalie, too. :)
Title: Re: Star position in soccer?
Post by: AmyD on May 30, 2013, 07:12 AM
My husband and son are die-hard soccer players and fans. They say the word you want is STRIKER...in the top levels of soccer, these are the people who play up front and score the goals. Doesn't matter whether they play in the center or not.
Title: Re: Star position in soccer?
Post by: olmue on May 30, 2013, 07:20 AM
So, semantically speaking, do you say he played striker? Or that he WAS striker? (Yes, my sports ignorance is showing here... In my defense, the places I've lived where soccer was more of a thing didn't use any English words at all to describe it...)
Title: Re: Star position in soccer?
Post by: writermutt on May 30, 2013, 08:28 AM
We're not pros or anything, but in rec soccer (my kids have played from pre-K through high school), I think the way forward and striker are used is often based on what the coach has heard and is familiar with. That said, here's a link of soccer positions at-a-glance. According to this, it says striker is a basic term, while center forward is advanced. http://www.soccer-for-parents.com/soccer-positions.html

Also, this may be more than you need, but here's a site with more indepth descriptions of each position, and you can find even more detailed info to the left of the page: http://www.soccer-universe.com/soccer-positions.html

I smiled when you'd said you were glad there's some goalie glory, too. Soccer is truly a team sport. I've seen games where the goalie could almost have taken a nap in the box b/c the offense did such a great job of keeping the ball on the other end of the field. And if it did head toward the goal, the defenders attacked. And I've heard the most "oohs" and "aahs" when the goalie seems to come from nowhere to block an almost certain goal or dives on the ball to stop a goal. But of course, it also takes scoring to win the game. Offense does most of the high-fiving on the field.  :)

As far as how to use striker in a sentence, I hear the kids say," I'm a striker." Or "I'm a forward." Or "I'm a defender." As for goalie, I hear it in a more defined sense, "I am THE goalie." I've also heard my hubby and other coaches say, "You'll play striker." Or "You're a striker/defender/forward/whatever."

How muddy is it now?  :grin

Title: Re: Star position in soccer?
Post by: Jean Reidy on May 30, 2013, 09:40 AM
Definitely "Striker." Used as "I'm a striker, you're a striker, everyone's a striker."
Title: Re: Star position in soccer?
Post by: olmue on May 30, 2013, 09:43 AM
Sounds great!

We don't play, but when we lived in Germany, our kids really got into some of the international games (world cup/Euro cup). My daughter who was only three at the time of the Euro cup is 8 now, and still recognizes some of the players. We always loved watching the goalies. Turkey and Germany had the best ones. :)
Title: Re: Star position in soccer?
Post by: anita on May 30, 2013, 12:29 PM
My son played from pre-school through college, as everything from defense (a back) to striker at one point or another--even during high school and college. I have been team manager for both his club team and our younger son's (middle school) club team for years.

Striker is the glory position, but there may not be a "center forward". Depends on the line-up. There may only be two forwards, a left and a right. You could say you were a forward or a striker. Some forwards, esp. if they are on the wings, (sides) do more feeding of the ball to a striker. I would consider the striker to be the big goal scorer, say a Lionel Messi or Cristiano Rinaldo type. I believe Rinaldo plays left forward, but I could be wrong.(Not sure about Messi) (both websites call them forwards)

I would say that being a "starter", which means that he starts the game, as opposed to a "sub" (substitute) is the bigger deal.

The center midfield player is key at controlling the ball, and, while the strikers, or forwards, are the ones who score, it's the defense who save the games and have very difficult positions, as does the goalie. The forwards are the glory players, though. They are usually the ones who are known best, just because they score.

The midfield (right and left wings and center, usually) run the most in a game. I think it's estimated that they may run the equivalent of a half-marathon in a game. Defense runs the least, and are subbed out the least.

You may find that players don't always play the same position, esp. in middle school or high school, and the team may change their line-up (3-4-3, meaning that they have three up front, four in the middle, and three defensive players in addition to a goalie, or a 2-4-4, and so forth, depending on the other team and their strengths.)

A coach may also reposition a player if the other team has a really fast player, moving one of his fastest players to be up against the forward (usually) with speed on the other team.

And, according to my son, playing forward is the easiest position. You just wait for someone to feed you the ball. You need speed to be up top (a forward) though.

The other thing that might interest you is that school ball is not that important to a soccer player's college prospects. It is more important that he be on a strong club team, preferably premier-level, and if he wants to play in college, he'd probably be trying to make an ODP (Olympic Development--although it has nothing to do with the Olympics) or Super-Y or Academy. ODP was big when my son was in middle school and high school, but I think Academy is now the bigger player in soccer.

So, if you want to affect the kid's soccer prospects in college, club ball is the bigger deal.
Title: Re: Star position in soccer?
Post by: Jeff Smith on June 28, 2013, 02:56 PM
The Goalie is the main player. The goalie is like a Quarter Back in American Football. The Goalie saves the day when the other team is trying to score.
I played soccer for many years. I played center Midfielder. This position plays Offense and Defense. Midfielders score and stop scores. Even though this is a key position in Soccer, The Goalie always saves the day or makes for a bad day if balls get by him or her. Goalie is the most important position for sure. They even wear a different uniform than the entire team to stand out as the Goalie.

Goalies are the only player that can use their hands too!
Title: Re: Star position in soccer?
Post by: anita on June 28, 2013, 04:26 PM
Goalie is either the hero or the goat. Depends on whether they save the goal from happening, or let the ball in.