SCBWI's Blueboard - A Message & Chat Board

Female Artists in Art History

Discussion started on

Liz
Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region indiana
 :hijacked
If you think women artist's are under represented.  Look at women architects in history.  In fact in the US, approx. 20% of architects are women, they are shut out at the very beginning of their career by the sexism. 

Very few people are aware that Hearst Castle was design by Julia Morgan, a female architect; she also designed many other building in Western US.  But her male counterparts are the ones that people know. 

There are other important early female architects - I would actually have to hunt down my books, I am no good with names.  Seldom are these names ever heard in any classroom, trust me I studied architectural history.  Not even the woman that taught some of our classes brought up these names. 

If we do teach these things to our children, we tend to lump them under a special heading instead of the general scope of history where these artists belong.
#31 - May 23, 2009, 01:13 PM
You must do the things you think you cannot do.  Eleanor Roosevelt

http://www.lizstrawwrites.com/

Here's another overlooked female artist: Alice Neel -- expressionist painter whose work is very moving and powerful. She saw a lot of tragedy in her life, and she makes no bones (altho she can construct a face) in her portrayals of her subjects. They are not always very flattering but she seems to bring out real heartfelt emotion in them and you get sucked in and empathize.

(Sorry to keep this thread going but I love talking art history.) My daughter is thinking about majoring in it and I am thrilled because I will may have an art history buddy at my disposal.
#32 - October 24, 2009, 08:43 AM
What's for pudding, Mimmy?

Illustration website:

http://www.puddintanesbrain.com

www.puddersputter.blogspot.com

Rock of The Westies
Roving Moderator
Poster Plus
  • **
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region nevada

During the late 1800s, half of all professional artists were women, as I learned during research for my mystery series. Boston especially had an enclave of women artists.
#34 - October 24, 2009, 03:29 PM
LAST SUMMER IN EDEN
Cozy mystery writer for ANNIE'S FICTION and GUIDEPOSTS
www.elizabethpenneyauthor.com

Emeritus
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region newengland
Well, the beauty of a woman's creative life can be in the children they produce. Men have a different role in the procreation cycle so you might find their internal desire to be creative in other aspects in their life leads to the gender imbalance you have pointed out. In other words,  perhaps their need to be creative isn't as well satisfied by nature as a female's....

Um, no.  I'd like to say more, but I won't.

In reading a biography recently, I learned that Queen Victoria's eldest daughter Vicky, who became Empress of Prussia (and mother of the Kaiser of WWI fame) was an amazingly talented painter and could have made her living as a portraitist if she hadn't been a princess.  And another daughter, Louise, was a talented sculptress who exhibited some of her work anonymously at Academy shows.  I'm going to try to find a link to some of their work.  And Queen Vic herself was no slouch as a watercolorist--art was considered a desirable accomplishment in 19th century upper class women (who had the means and leisure to pursue it)...it's a shame that many probably wonderful women artists never got to pursue their art because it was considered improper for women to do so.
#35 - October 29, 2009, 06:21 AM
« Last Edit: October 29, 2009, 10:04 AM by Marissa Doyle »
The Leland Sisters series: Courtship and Curses, Bewitching Season, Betraying Season (Holt BYR/Macmillan)
www.marissadoyle.com
www.nineteenteen.com

Um no. Sorry, Headwax. Not this woman.


And thanks, Marissa. Yes. We are in a better place now. Not perfect, but we are making great strides. :)

#36 - October 29, 2009, 08:17 AM
What's for pudding, Mimmy?

Illustration website:

http://www.puddintanesbrain.com

www.puddersputter.blogspot.com

agy wilson

Guest
This is something our critique group discusses and would love to help change to a more equitable, reflective environment. One of the advantages MOST of our male counterparts have, they don't have to balance the children/household/other jobs act. Some do a lot more, especially in these enlightened times, but the lion's share still falls to females. That cuts into the head space, development time as an artist. I believe this works to children's writers' advantage, but as an writer/illustrator, I can say it is "simpler" for me to write, than to illustrate and methink it often shows.

Some other artists of note besides Artemissia: Elizabeth Ney, Kathe Kollwitz, Louise Nevelson, Berthe Morrisot. One of my FAVORITE WORKING illustrators (she's self trained, but then she had some damned good beginnings, as in her parents William and Marie Zorach) is Dahlov Ipcar.

I wonder if there's a way to present portfolios in a gender neutral way? As for the big awards, that's out of our hands, I appreciate what the Committees do, and goodness knows it's ANOTHER conversation, but it's Librarians who nominate and decide the Caldecott. I think the hardest realization about this particular award isn't it's the art with the most merit, but with the meritorous IMPACT on its reader.

Interesting discussion, but I'd love to see more or brainstorming on how to balance this out.

Agy Wilson
#37 - December 07, 2009, 02:05 PM

Rock of The Westies
Roving Moderator
Poster Plus
  • **
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region nevada
It's nice to see you here Agy. I used to participate on the write4kids boards some time ago, but with all the new networking sites it's a challenge to keep up with all of the updates. I just got back on the SCBWI site and their boards but I've been perusing more than participating.

For the brainstorming, I really appreciate all the input on this thread and calling attention to the contributions put forth by female artists. What we can do to turn things around is bring it out and speak of it openly. The manuscript I spoke of when I started this thread was an attempt to do just that. I've even considered using it as an introduction to a companion book about female artists (which I have yet to write). It's received some nice personals but I've been told it doesn't have broad commercial appeal. Funny though, there are books written with a humorous twist about male artists that seem to be timeless. One of my faves is Nina Laden's When Pigasso met Mootisse. And Nina is another female artist that has exceptional humor and style.

You hit it straight on when you spoke of women who work on their art are also having to devote more time to their household, and children than their male counterparts. In addition, many like me, have jobs outside the home. It's challenging.

There are so many females out there doing extraordinary work and some with mass market appeal. Judy Shackner, Felicia Bond and Jane Chapman come to mind.
#38 - December 07, 2009, 10:25 PM
Fur Balls & Feathers & Fins, Oh My! Animals Are My Kind of People
 www.cynthiakremsner.com

agy wilson

Guest
Exactly some of it IS education, Funny Stuff. Some of it is vocalizing. I think there's more.... hmmmmmmm, let me ruminate  :sheep for a bit before I start rabble rousing  :mob (could you tell my ten year old and I were having a GREAT time admiring the emoticons? :^P) :tease   :giggle

#39 - December 08, 2009, 05:40 PM

agy wilson

Guest
P.S. wouldn't it be a nice resource to compile all of these (she) peeps in one place and add to it as people think more?

Someone had spoke of the fulfillment of women beyond their artistic life. Though it's true I love my children and role as mother, I fully and equally see myself as a creator of my products. Having grown up with the attitude that my "gifts" were mostly of the dancing monkey variety ("But what will you DO with your art) from the difficulty of my work being seen as valuable as say my husband's tells me personally there's a lot more to the subject. Beyond that, women have had the social rewriting/stigma of not being seemly bias that negates what they do, whether while they do it or after they do it, as expressed in some of the examples here.

Wouldn't this be a richer world if everyone's gifts were valued, talent was recognized for what it is, and not attached to a gender or some other arbitrary definition? Seriously, these are valid, valuable discussions.

It harkens back to the argument of whether children's literature has similar value to adults (I'd argue it has WAY MORE, no one can love a premise or an idea like a child, and books and ideas have profound impact on children's lives when there's often a jaded dearth in adults). Think of the billions made by Holliwood and then ask how many originated in the children's world, via books, graphic novels or games. Think how many of the classics are now specifically marketed to children, from Dracula to the Bronte's.

Sigh, a girl can dream.
#40 - December 08, 2009, 05:53 PM

D.Diorio

Guest
Thought I'd mention the National Women's Musem in D.C.  I'm sure there's quite a lot on women artists archived there.

Some personal favs: I once saw a retrospective of the French sculptor Camille Claudel there that bowled me over! There's quite a bit of Berthe Morisot's work in the Impressionist collection in Paris that is simpy stunning! Frida Kahlo is a personal heroine of mine with all she overcame through and by her art.
#41 - March 02, 2010, 08:12 AM

Members:

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.