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Black protagonist and racism in fantasy?

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rbt

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Hey guys, I was thinking about something and wanted your opinions. Why are there no black protagonist in children's fantasy fiction, or even modern fiction? People have said "A black protagonist would sell", but yeah, right... I've seen so much closet racism come out as a result of our new president, I dont know what to think anymore. Of course, many people wouldnt outrightly say that that's the reason they're avoiding the book (cause the main protagonist is black) the same way they wouldnt admit why they wouldnt vote for the new president. (Though their reason was obvious) Personally I think that skin color makes people look at a black protagonist as a "lesser hero". Not trying to wrap politics into my discussion, but I'll reference something I heard said about our new president before the election. When both parties were still running, a man said in an interview, "Anytime you have a "negro" running for president, he's not a first stringer. He's definately a second stringer..." In other words, the black candidate is not as good or qualified as the white candidate simply because of his skin color. No matter how educated he is.

So how about it? Are black protagonist "second stringers"? Do blacks in fantasy have to remain a sidekick because racism demands so?
#1 - February 01, 2009, 06:38 AM
« Last Edit: February 01, 2009, 12:49 PM by rbt »

THE TRUE MEANING OF SMEKDAY, a brilliant and hilarious mg fantasy from last year, has a black protagonist. She's a girl, and ends up saving the world. So, I think this is changing ...
#2 - February 01, 2009, 07:32 AM
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THE EAR, THE EYE, AND THE ARM by Nancy Farmer is admittedly more SF than fantasy, but it features futuristic kids in Zimbabwe. It won a Newbery Honor. Anne Ursu has a Greek mythology-based series where one of the two main characters is black. (Two cousins, one white American, one black British.) And I just critted a couple chapters from someone on this board who is writing a MG fantasy with African roots. To me it seemed like it would have a wide appeal regardless of race.

While it's true that there are far fewer heroes of color in non-contemporary/problem novel type books, I also think this is changing. Personally I'd love to read more books of all genres with a racially diverse cast where race isn't the issue. If you want to have a "mainstream" fantasy that happens to have black characters, I think you need to walk the balance between ethnic flavor and mainstream accessibility. (I don't mean you personally, rbt; just writers in general, you know.) And, the publishers/booksellers need to be able to see books with nonwhite characters not as just African American lit, but Just Plain Books. (I think that sometimes that is harder--the publishers and writers are okay with it, but then the bookstore sinks books into the AA section where kids looking for YA might not find them...)

But--I DO think it's changing. Everyone I know who's read Smekday, for instance, LOVED it, and I don't think anyone consciously thought about what race the MC was.
#3 - February 01, 2009, 09:06 AM

i think there aren't enough writers of color
within the field. we do tend to write what we
can relate to often. i mean, protag notwithstanding,
even side characters can be multi-cultural. but often
isn't in contemporary YA fiction.

it's something to think about as writers.

but as a writer of color, do you HAVE to write
to "represent" your people somehow? i don't think
that should be the case either.

it's an interesting question.
but i didn't grow up reading of protags who were
asian-american. much less an asian barbie doll
when i was younger...
#4 - February 01, 2009, 09:19 AM
« Last Edit: February 01, 2009, 09:53 AM by xiaotien »
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People of color in fantasy books are indeed few and far between, although we've been seeing more Asian protagonists (think of Lian Hearn's Tales of the Otori). But there have been attempts to be more inclusive. For example, Ursula K. LeGuin's WIZARD OF EARTHSEA, pubbed in 1968, has a dark-skinned protagonist, Ged, and his close friend Vetch is described as "very dark of skin, not red-brown like Ged and Jasper and most folk of the Archipelago, but black-brown." The man who becomes Archmage is "black-skinned." Interestingly, a group of barbarian raiders seemed to be modeled on Vikings. They're called "a savage people, white-skinned, yellow-haired, and fierce." A couple of years ago, an execrable tv movie was made of the first two Earthsea books, and a white actor played Ged.

More recently, Nnedi Okorafor-Mbachu's futuristic fantasy, THE SHADOW SPEAKER, is set in West Africa in 2070, and like her earlier fantasy novel, ZAHRAH THE WINDSEEKER, has African protagonists. Like Olmue said about SMEKDAY, things are changing, but v-e-r-y slowly.

#5 - February 01, 2009, 10:07 AM

People of color in fantasy books are indeed few and far between, although we've been seeing more Asian protagonists (think of Lian Hearn's Tales of the Otori).


i think this was the only book my editor
could think of that was comparable to silver phoenix
when she pitched to marketing.

and it's not YA?

and rab, don't forget dragoneye reborn! =)
that's new this year, and it uses asian influenced setting.
#6 - February 01, 2009, 10:18 AM
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Tamora Pierce has a black protagonist in her Circle of Magic series (Daja's Book).  And the sequel to it in The Circle Opens series, Cold Fire.  Those books are not particularly new, especially the first series.

IMHO, I think it occurs more than people may notice.  Spec fic has always been a place for commenting on society, so it more often has situations that are not the accepted norm.  And because spec fic readers are accepting of those situations, they don't make a big deal of out it that would garner a lot of press.
#7 - February 01, 2009, 10:50 AM
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If I remember rightly, most of the major characters in the Earthsea books are if not black at least dark-skinned. This was something that Ursula Le Guin did deliberately - not heavy-handedly, but via the odd reference here and there.
#8 - February 01, 2009, 10:53 AM

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A very curious post indeed. (This board seems to talk about everything) I have not read any MG books that feature any protagonists who are black so I cannot reference anything. However, I can say this:

Rbt was accurate in his/her assumption that black people are considered 'second string' (where's inspired when you need her, she can help me on this) they are thought of as a lesser person simply because of the hardships that are entwined in their history. Colonialists used to consider them three quarters of a human and some people, to this very day, still hold this sordid ideal. The fact that most--not all--black people carry about themselves in such a "ghetto" fashion does not help to break this opinion either.

In retrospect, I did not make the character of my novel a black person, although he lives in a predominantly black country, because I did not want to play into the idea that because I am black, or part thereof, that I should write about a black person as well. I find this silly, I'm an artist I go where my heart guides me and I do not conform to the pro black political correctness "oh, we are always suffering" ploy of Al Sharpton and other black leaders of this kind.
If black people truly wish to rise then they should stop using the past as an excuse with which to shape the future. Yes, it is good to remember the struggles you have endured but it is also good to look toward the future as a bright--though difficult--road toward happiness and fulfillment. The past will always haunt you and people will always degrade you, but you have to look deep inside yourself and let your light shine trough; defy the odds and say to the world: "I believe, because yes, I can."

Black protagonists in books are few, but I believe that all this is changing. Whereas before it was considered almost taboo, nowadays (thanks to the interest in Obama) it may be a less difficult thing to accomplish.  :cheerleader Who knows, we might even see a black gangsta superman, who fights crime and his sole weakness is pot. :dr I'm sure my generation would love to read about that. Might even make a nice drug campaign ad, too.
#9 - February 01, 2009, 11:47 AM
« Last Edit: February 01, 2009, 11:58 AM by Tyson D. Mc Donald »
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I love Earthsea and most of UKL's books. I particularly loved THE TELLING. She has an Indian character as the lead (it is futuristic SF) and she was authentic to the ethnicity in her details yet her story has a very universal appeal. It's hard to be a UKL (!!!) but I think the key is to have that universal appeal, irrespective of the background of the main character. At least I hope so. I would hate to think that in spite of a great premise/character/plot/execution a ms would be rejected just because of the race of the mc. I'm an optimist though! Call me a fool but I really believe it. There will be more of this in the future. Write it and they will acquire/buy/read. Tell you in ten years if that actually works!  
#10 - February 01, 2009, 11:55 AM
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Xiaotien, I thought Tales of the Otori had been marketed for both adult and YA--the little versions that break up ACROSS THE NIGHTINGALE FLOOR into several parts are especially aimed at YA, aren't they? And yes, I should have mentioned my fave, EON! Would you include translations from Japanese, such as Nahoko Uehashi's MORIBITO: GUARDIAN OF THE SPIRIT? Also, I'm trying to remember whether Katherine Paterson's Japanese historical novels have a fantasy element in them or not, but I just can't recall them well enough. Lloyd Alexander's IRON RING used the history and culture of India as its basis, as did Suzanne Fisher Staples' foray into fantasy, SHIVA'S FIRE.

I'm glad that people are able to think of all these titles, and I agree with JetGirl that speculative fiction often challenges cultural norms. As GaryC said, Ursula K. LeGuin (the daughter of anthropologists who studied Native Americans, and who was writing about Earthsea in the 60's) purposely made her characters dark-skinned for that very reason (something I didn't notice when I read them as a teenager). On the other hand, when we can name almost all the YA fantasy titles that have people of color as protagonists, that seems to say a lot about how few there still are.
#11 - February 01, 2009, 12:04 PM

rbt

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Tyson D. Mc Donald, I absolutely agree that you shouldnt write a black character as part of a "pro black movement. But I'd do it for no particular reason, or anything like that. And you guys mention Wizard of Earthsea? Are these characters supposed to be aliens? It seems like black characters have to be alien or monsters before they'll be accepted. Many times black aliens have to have a butt crack or a brand on their foreheads as well as other non human distictive features. So are these "dark skinned" characters supposed to be black humans? Just because some one is dark skinned doesnt deem them human. Sounds like they're alien, but I may be wrong. Please clarify
#12 - February 01, 2009, 12:58 PM

Earthsea is fantasy set in a world of humans and dragons.

Similarly Meredith ann Pierce's Darkangel trilogy is set in a fantasy world filled with different skinned people, from mauve, white, blue, green, brown and black. A major secondary character introduced in the second and third books is described as black skinned.

I would love to see more multicultural books in general - not just in fantasy.
#13 - February 01, 2009, 01:15 PM
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rab, alas, i haven't read the series myself.
but what i saw, was in the adult fantasy section?
author may have more that is cross over?

and yes, the moribito book came out this year!
that was translated tho from a japanese book?

i loved the earthsea series! i know le guin was
very upset that they didn't use many actors of color
for the television remake. (i think she was more than
upset.) BUT it was the reason i found her books and
began reading them. now she is my favorite fantasy author!
or one of the top ones.
#14 - February 01, 2009, 02:21 PM
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Tyson D. Mc Donald, I absolutely agree that you shouldnt write a black character as part of a "pro black movement. But I'd do it for no particular reason, or anything like that.
Umm, I am not quite certain where this all came from but I was just answering your question. (Unlike some people who chose to avoid the crux of your query) I really don't care if black people or any kind of people are in books or not. I don't let this inclusion or lack thereof be a burden when I read. I don't really care what the character looks like, (unless they're a hot girl) I just read for the stories. It seems to me you're somewhat angry at it all. A topic like this is bound to be controversial, perhaps now you'll understand why it is seldom brought up--especially in novels and mainstream media.
#15 - February 01, 2009, 03:11 PM
« Last Edit: February 01, 2009, 03:13 PM by Tyson D. Mc Donald »
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I read a very interesting blog on this subject not that long ago. The blogger recommended not identifying your characters by skin color, unless you have a very good reason. That way, your readers can make the character into anybody they want. If you have a character with black hair, and your reader is an African-American, then they can see your character as black. If they're an Asian reader, they can see them as Asian, and so and and so forth.

When I read this blog, I was trying to decide whether to go into more detail about what one of my main characters look like. To me, he had always been mixed (His mother is black and his father is white), but in my ms, I described him only with curly black hair and green eyes. I decided not to take the advice of this blog and I added in his race. I did this because it's also true, that if a majority of your readers are white, then they will automatically assume your black haired character is white. I didn't want that.
#16 - February 01, 2009, 05:28 PM

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Precisely. You should not let race or its epithets define your novel--unless that is your intention. Most people aren't into the drama that that topic brings and children can care less what the character's skin color is. (They are so innocent and pure, they're the best people in the world. Makes you wonder how is it they mature into such monsters sometimes.)
#17 - February 01, 2009, 05:36 PM
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rbt

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In retrospect, I did not make the character of my novel a black person, although he lives in a predominantly black country, because I did not want to play into the idea that because I am black, or part thereof, that I should write about a black person as well. I find this silly, I'm an artist I go where my heart guides me and I do not conform to the pro black political correctness "oh, we are always suffering" ploy of Al Sharpton and other black leaders of this kind.

Tyson D. Mc Donald, this is where my response came from. But I wasnt trying to be funny. I was just answering YOUR question like you did for mine. And no, I'm not upset. Never said I was.

I read a very interesting blog on this subject not that long ago. The blogger recommended not identifying your characters by skin color, unless you have a very good reason. That way, your readers can make the character into anybody they want. If you have a character with black hair, and your reader is an African-American, then they can see your character as black. If they're an Asian reader, they can see them as Asian, and so and and so forth.


Raynbow Gignilliat (aka LeFay)  I dont get something. You have an excellent point, but just as they said about the Earthsea characters- why is it that if the character is black skinned or dark skinned in the book, mainstream America replaces them with a white character? And children may not care what color a character is but parents do. Racism is passed down by parents. Parents can also dictate what book a child buys. I've been in book stores and libraries and heard parents tell children to put a book back for there own reasons and agendas instead of letting the child choose for themselves. Who's to say they wont do the same if the MC is not white? If they teach the child that it's not okay to accept a book with a MC that doesnt look like them, the same way that many did regarding our new president- then what? Personally, I dont care what color the president is, and I really didnt get all whoopdie-doo over the fact that he's black (technically, he's not all black, but if he was, I still wouldnt care) But even with him being crowned the "first black president", I've seen so much racism that people SAY isnt alive today. But it's alive and smoking. If this kind of ignorance exist in a presidential election, dare we be foolish enough to say it's not everywhere else? I find that most racist people are uncomfortable accepting someone of a different race, in a dominant role. That's why the new president brought out the true feelings of many "whites", because they've held that authoritative role for so long, it scared and upset them at the though of it changing. And people do fear change. Many of them felt that no matter what the president could do for this country, they simply did not want a black man to lead us. They'd rather see the country fall than to see someone in office trying to make a difference. And they were telling their children to view it the same way. Some had their chidren calling the man a "monkey" for hypocrites sake and this is uncalled for! Many STILL wont accept the notion of a black president whether he's in office or not.  Dont get me wrong here, I'm not angry. I'm just addressing the issue. I'm not "pro black" or any other prejudice label. My sister in law is white and I love her! But I do feel that a person should have the right to make the MC any color they want if Hollywood can change them in film adaptations. My question is the underlying motive of WHY they change them.

The bottom line is that this issue is there and people act like it isnt. For example, in comics- Why was Superman white? Why is Batman white? Why is every mainstream superhero white? And it's been this way for decades. There are very few heroes of other races and most of the black ones have to be monsters. (Spawn or Blade) And name me ONE children's book where the MC is black and it sold well with the likes of say... Eragon. Now as much contraversy that I've heard over that series (people saying he stole his material from other writers) do you honestly think that book would have sold if Eragon were black? And do you honestly think that Hollywood would not have changed him to a white character? It probably wouldnt have made it to film. Would A Series of Unfortunate Events been a household name if the MCs were black or another race? And would anyone have cared if Edward and Bella were a love story about a black girl and black vampire in the Twilight series? The author talked about how "beautiful" Edward was as a vamp. Would he have been so incredible if he were black or another race?
A writer should have the right to make his MC any color they want, but nobody just like in real life, just like in the presidential election, nobody should have the right to say that that MC is not good enough to be a hero just because they dont look like them. Nor should they judge them based on that merit, but unfortunately, they do
#18 - February 01, 2009, 07:43 PM
« Last Edit: February 01, 2009, 08:06 PM by rbt »

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I do like to know what a character looks like, and their skin color is part of that, but it's only so I can see them in my minds eye.  But caring that their a specific race isn't an issue, unless it's supposed to be, but that's for the writer to dictate.  

In the Twilight series it is important that many of the characters are Native American, but it's not important what race the Vampires are. 

As for black MC's not being represented in most fantasy's, I have no idea, other than culture.  Martial arts stories are typically full of Asian characters; I see traditional fantasy as European story telling and with that it's mostly white characters.  I'm not trying to cause any issues, just trying to actually address your basic question. 
#19 - February 01, 2009, 07:46 PM
« Last Edit: February 01, 2009, 08:03 PM by msw »

I read a very interesting blog on this subject not that long ago. The blogger recommended not identifying your characters by skin color, unless you have a very good reason. That way, your readers can make the character into anybody they want. If you have a character with black hair, and your reader is an African-American, then they can see your character as black. If they're an Asian reader, they can see them as Asian, and so and and so forth.


this is so interesting. i've had this discussion
over at sfnovel as well. writers  were surprised
when i said unless told otherwise somehow, i ALWAYS
assume characters are caucasian.

it's what i grew up reading.
it's what i grew up watching.

why would i think otherwise?

so alas, that blogger's theory does not work with
me as a reader.
#20 - February 01, 2009, 08:13 PM
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What about Robert Salvatore's Drizzt D'Orden? He's a black elf and he's my favorite elf character ever. He comes up against a whole world of prejudice in the series because he is a dark elf and dark elves are supposed to all be evil. He has a very hard time gaining acceptance and forcing people to look past his color.

And for what it's worth my main character in my Highlights fiction contest story last year for future stories was an 11 yr old black girl in space.

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#21 - February 01, 2009, 08:25 PM

rbt

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What about Robert Salvatore's Drizzt D'Orden? He's a black elf and he's my favorite elf character ever. He comes up against a whole world of prejudice in the series because he is a dark elf and dark elves are supposed to all be evil. He has a very hard time gaining acceptance and forcing people to look past his color.

And for what it's worth my main character in my Highlights fiction contest story last year for future stories was an 11 yr old black girl in space.

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Is this black elf the main protagonist, or just a side arm to a white elf? And did you win the fiction contest?
#22 - February 01, 2009, 08:52 PM

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He's the main character with a bunch of white sidekicks- a dwarf, a human girl, and a barbarian guy. Oh yeah and a halfling. Drizzt's main sidekick is his magical black panther that he can call up at will.

And yes I did win the Highlights contest and I never thought of my heroine as a second stringer.

Oh and I'm white and didn't write my story for any particular race breaking reasons.

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#23 - February 01, 2009, 08:57 PM

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I found a list on line of some multi-ethnic fantasy (children's) here: http://chickenspaghetti.typepad.com/chicken_spaghetti/2007/11/i-asked-for-sug.html. I second Lionboy. As far as I understand, the book did very well in both the US and England (where it was originally published). The other books people have mentioned--I think the point about them is that they are 1) well-written, and 2) while the ethnicity of the character is of course an important part of their makeup, it isn't the sole issue of the book. Even if you have a book about slavery, if it succeeds I think it will be because it is about a character doing something, ie, it is a plot/story, rather than lots of words about an Issue.

My impression of film is maybe the opposite of rbt's (unless I misunderstood)--it seems that Hollywood is more likely to take a white story and diversify it a bit than to make everyone a blanket snow white. (They diversified at least two roles in Twilight, for example--and nobody can say that that film is suffering!). I know--minor characters are not the same as the hero. But I guess the (admittedly limited) films I've seen seem to be moving in a positive direction.

I think there is unfortunately a lot of sad history that can explain why there has been a dearth until now of books with nonwhite heroes--but with regards to the present, I guess I feel excited rather than hopeless. I'm seeing more and more regular books with a multiracial cast as opposed to the MR elements being confined to Problem Novels of the Ghetto, and I'm glad. (Problem novels not being my genre, regardless of race...)
#24 - February 01, 2009, 09:23 PM

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I'm a little confused about what's happening in this discussion, but I just wanted to throw in my two cents:  I personally believe the issue of race in fantasy and the lack of black characters goes back to the roots of high fantasy.  If you think about it, most fantasy up to this point has been based in the medieval European tradition/Norse tradition a la Tolkien.  It's not so much that it was an intentional oversight, I think, but something that's based in the history of Europe.  It's an intuitive thing, almost. You see a lot of white characters in these stories because that's what most writers associate with castles, crusaders, the saxons, druid magic, and so on and so forth.  

But! I also think it's very important to acknowledge that this is something that's been improving over time.  As fantasy writers start to break out of the medieval European tradition (like xiaotien has with her novel) and explore other cultures you'll start to see more diversity in the spread of characters.  In my first novel, the characters are predominately white, but it's because they come from a small, fairly homogenous country.  In my current WIP, however, I've been a lot more sensitive to the idea of race, but I'm not including it for the sake of including it.  My characters are diverse because they span an entire continent, and it's what the story calls for.  This kind of diversity is also present in shows like Avatar, which is insanely popular with kids and even adults.

Quote
it seems that Hollywood is more likely to take a white story and diversify it a bit than to make everyone a blanket snow white

Unfortunately that's EXACTLY what happened with the Avatar movie.  Most of the fans are in an uproar because they cast all white kids as the main characters and didn't honor the multiculturism of the show at all.  
#25 - February 01, 2009, 09:27 PM
« Last Edit: February 01, 2009, 09:29 PM by Alex Bracken »

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Okay, the Avatar thing would annoy me, too. (Like I said, movies are not my forte...) I guess it happens both ways?
#26 - February 01, 2009, 10:03 PM

mswatkins

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I'm a little confused about what's happening in this discussion, but I just wanted to throw in my two cents:  I personally believe the issue of race in fantasy and the lack of black characters goes back to the roots of high fantasy.  If you think about it, most fantasy up to this point has been based in the medieval European tradition/Norse tradition a la Tolkien.  It's not so much that it was an intentional oversight, I think, but something that's based in the history of Europe.  It's an intuitive thing, almost. You see a lot of white characters in these stories because that's what most writers associate with castles, crusaders, the saxons, druid magic, and so on and so forth.  

I agree completely with this.  I do not think it's racism as much as traditionalism.  I don't think many writers, especially writers for children, would consider one race less important than another.  Writers are typically more open differences because it can make for a captivating story. 
#27 - February 02, 2009, 04:30 AM
« Last Edit: February 02, 2009, 04:37 AM by msw »

 My characters are diverse because they span an entire continent, and it's what the story calls for.  This kind of diversity is also present in shows like Avatar, which is insanely popular with kids and even adults.

Unfortunately that's EXACTLY what happened with the Avatar movie.  Most of the fans are in an uproar because they cast all white kids as the main characters and didn't honor the multiculturism of the show at all.  

Hmm ... I thought Dev Patel from Slumdog was playing Prince Zuko ? I would be seriously upset if M Night Shyamalan picked an all white cast!!! It's an ASIAN fantasy.
#28 - February 02, 2009, 05:43 AM
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I disagree that it's a bad thing to write a black character as part of a "pro black movement".  I think there is nothing wrong with deliberately writing your character as black in order to increase cultural awareness and to bridge the gap in literature. I think that little black (and other minorities in this country, of course) girls and boys would do well to see protagonists that look like them and act and think like they do.  It raises self-esteem and gives them the confidence to believe in themselves.  Imagine what it would be like to pick up a book and automatically know that the people in the book don’t look anything like you, and that beauty, when described, is completely counter to everything you see when you look in the mirror.  Whether you believe it or not, the repercussions of slavery still exist…where people feel that if your skin has a darker tint to it, that you are somehow a “second stringer”.  These types of attitudes were perpetuated by a deeply rooted desire to feel good about enslaving human beings and treat them as dogs.  If they possessed some sort of inferiority, then, why, it was completely okay to treat them as such. 

I for one see absolutely nothing wrong with writing books to strengthen the black race.  I also believe that the majority of that strengthening should be directed at children since this is when we first learn about and adopt our identities. 

There is so much more I’d like to say, but I won’t…
#29 - February 02, 2009, 06:03 AM

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In other words, the black candidate is not as good or qualified as the white candidate simply because of his skin color. No matter how educated he is.
So how about it? Are black protagonist "second stringers"? Do blacks in fantasy have to remain a sidekick because racism demands so?

Yes, I think I'll say a little more...

To be honest, this kind of statement from people should be laughable.  Completely and utterly laughable-- but, I can't lie when I say that this type of sentiment ENRAGES me.

I am willing to bet that the people who share this sentiment can barely enunciate a proper sentence.

As a superbly educated black woman, I feel that this type of ignorance should be ignored (hey, maybe that's why ignorance and ignore seem so similar!).  It's not truth.  It's an attempt for one person to feel better about themselves and their lack of___ (fill in the blank).  It works the same way with overweight protagonists (although this is changing too) and any other taboo topic in our society. 


As it relates to books, typically only minorities purchase books with minority main characters.  This is because people of the major race have no need to identify with minority characters (whether attributed to racism or just a lack of interest).  If a minority wants to read, we have to read what is out there.  There is very little choice for us.  If a majority wants to read, the sky is the limit.  The same things goes for black movies.  Very rarely do you see throngs of white people in the movies trying to watch a Tyler Perry flick, but hordes of black people come out to see any number of movies without a single black character in it.  And because of this, black books/movies simply do not make as much money (as compared to our white counterparts).  Because it doesn't make as much money, the publishers don't publish as often.  Because they don't publish as often, black protagonists are underrepresented.
#30 - February 02, 2009, 06:09 AM
« Last Edit: February 02, 2009, 06:27 AM by inspired007 »

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