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another photo question: subbing article with pics

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I'm going to send out my article this week, and it has about ten photos that go with it.  I have copied them to disk, but as far as hard copies, would you recommend printing them out with a color printer (on paper) and labeling them with title/description/photographer, OR should I get photos made and label all that stuff on the back of each photo?

Thanks,

Sara
#1 - October 31, 2009, 11:35 AM
"No furniture is so charming as books."
--Sydney Smith

http://saramatson.com/

Shirley Anne

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I have sold hundreds of photographs to magazines. My question: Is this a requested article? If not, send only the hard copies, put your name and © on each one and a descriptive title. If these are requested photos, then the editor should tell you what she wants, a CD, JPEG or TIFF, probably 300 ppi, etc. But don't expect an editor, or first reader, to open a disk to look at your pictures. You have to attract her attention right away, the minute she opens the envelope. Also, ten is a lot. If these weren't requested, send at most 3 or 4 of your best and write that you have more. Do you have an upscale printer? If not, take them to Costco where I understand they do a good job, or a similar place, where you won't have to spend too much.

Shirley Anne
#2 - November 01, 2009, 10:41 AM

Shirley Anne

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I just read your other note. Since theses are requested, ask the editor what she wants. Do you use Photoshop or Elements? If the pictures were sent to you as JPEG I would immediately save them as TIFF and not worry about more degradation problems. Also, if you rename your JPEGs the degradation probably won't be a problem. But ask that editor how many she wants, and JPEG or TIFF. Since you did not take these, I would NOT put © or your name on them. Just make sure you have a written photo release from whoever took the photos.

Also, the images seem to be very small. It isn't only the 300 ppi that matters, it is the actual total size since these will be printed. Keep in mind that 300 ppi from, for example, a 12 megapixel point and shoot is much smaller than from a 12 megapixel professional DSLR camera. But if these are the ones you have, then that's what you'll send and go from there.

Good luck with this project.

Shirley Anne
#3 - November 01, 2009, 10:50 AM

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Thanks, Shirley Anne!
#4 - November 01, 2009, 12:41 PM
"No furniture is so charming as books."
--Sydney Smith

http://saramatson.com/

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One more question, Shirley Anne...What should a photo release say?  I've tried searching the web, but the ones I've found are model/subject releases.

Thanks for your help; I don't know what I'd do without these boards!

:)  Sara
#5 - November 01, 2009, 04:42 PM
"No furniture is so charming as books."
--Sydney Smith

http://saramatson.com/

Shirley Anne

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What are your photos? I think you said you didn't take the pictures, but correct me if I'm wrong. You don't always need a release, and it depends on the subject, etc. I'm not an attorney but I am always careful. Usually, for example, when I need photos of kids doing something, I "hire" my grandkids, avoiding any problems.  If I have a photo of a person who can be identified, or of a specific product, or a particular property, I use a release. The releases I use are property and for people, easily found on the net.

Tell me a little more about your photographs, where they came from, do you have unlimited rights to use them and do you have that in writing, etc.

Keep in mind that you will also have to decide on the "rights" for the photographs, separate from the "rights" of the manuscript. For example, while many magazines will buy "All Rights" to an article, such as the Carus Group, they only ask for "One Time Rights" for a photograph.  Highlights wants "All Rights" for photos as well as manuscripts, so I am very careful when signing those contracts, because I can't use those particular photos again.

Shirley Anne
#6 - November 02, 2009, 06:16 AM

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Most of the photos are of an object, not a person.  I think what I need to do is go back to the subject of my article and the photographer and talk to them about this.  Being new to NF, and not a photographer, none of these questions occurred to me before!

Thanks for all your help, and for teaching me something new.  :)

Sara
#7 - November 02, 2009, 09:35 AM
"No furniture is so charming as books."
--Sydney Smith

http://saramatson.com/

I'm so glad I found this thread!

Shirley Anne, I need to find photo releases for Highlights.  Some photos are being provided by the person I interviewed and feature him with his work (a custom puppet builder and his characters), and some are of my kids "modeling" puppets from a pattern he provided.

What exactly would I need to include in these releases?  Is there a site on the net you prefer?

Thanks!

Michelle
#8 - December 22, 2009, 08:07 PM

Shirley Anne

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I would just search the net for photo releases. There are many. I'm not an attorney so couldn't tell you which is best, but if the person agrees to the photos, then Highlights should be satisfied with a standard release. It appears that you will need a release for the person interviewed, and a separate release for using the puppets. He should sign both. That's what I would do but, again, this is NOT legal advice.

The photos I've sold to Highlights have been animals and birds, so I have not sent a release to that publication.

I belong to a number of photographic clubs and societies, and in some of the magazines and on their websites are many articles written by lawyers on this subject. But in your case, you aren't taking pictures of people or objects that might be subject to lawsuits, as I understand what you have written. Still, you want those releases, and Highlights will require them.

Shirley Anne
#9 - January 05, 2010, 03:09 PM

Thanks for the help, Shirley Anne!
#10 - January 05, 2010, 07:34 PM

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I'm a professional photographer. My pictures have been used in a lot of mags and I have also used other photog's photos of me for articles I have written.

Almost unilaterally, part of the contract you sign as the writer will pass the legal responsibility of the photos to you and indemnify the magazine from any problems. And so the editors will generally be happy with an assurance that you have the proper releases and won't even ask to see them. Certain types of mags, though, will insist on THEIR release. There are three kinds:

1. A copyright release by the photographer stating that you have the right to reproduce the work. This may or may not include a bit about "derivative works" so the picture can be cropped or retouched or altered into artwork. Unless you're working with someone difficult, the simpler the better. I provide releases like this every day to authors who use my headshot on their book jackets or other items. I ask for written releases, often very informally via email, by photographers who take pictures of me that I would like to use. I always work hard to get them photo credit.

2. A model release by anyone in the photo. The last thing you need is someone deciding at the last minute that they don't want their picture in the mag. this happened to me after the proof stage of a book. I wound up pulling their image, but the release could have enabled me to force the issue and keep it in there if it had been impossible to take it out (cost me a thousand dollars to do so and delayed publication, but they were unfortunately lawyers and I learned--don't take pictures of lawyers!)

3. A property release if the location of the shoot is not publically owned (and a good idea even if it is.) Stores, office buildings, museums, homes, yards all need a release. Parks are generally okay. So are City halls. Be careful with libraries. Definitely don't mess with Disney in any way, shape or form, not park pictures, not even images of their products.

Hope this helps.
#11 - January 05, 2010, 09:10 PM
Author of iPad apps, MG books, and women's fiction

Thank you, TexasGirl!  That definitely clarifies things.  This will make a great reference for future articles.

Michelle
#12 - January 06, 2010, 08:04 AM

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