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submission guidelines for artists rep......any suggestions?

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Iceartist

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I've been looking at websites for artist reps--I want to try for illustration projects; probably starting in educational/magazine work. To that end I've been working on a portfolio (both digital and hard copy), and will be putting together a web site.

I've also been researching rep's websites--and I almost never find submission guidelines. I want to send an email with some samples attached & website link included, and tell them I will send a hard copy at their request. I really don't want to send out dozens of hard copies (10 pages so far), as the cost would be exorbitant.

Has anyone done a lot of submissions to agents, & if so, how did you approach it? Call each one & ask how to proceed? Any advice greatly welcomed!!  :star2
#1 - August 01, 2010, 06:46 PM

I haven't done many to agents, but the first thing you must do is finish your website. Get it up asap. Have at least 15 samples. Keep adding more as you make them.

I can't believe they don't have submission guidelines? They all do.

I think your plan is a good one. Altho, some say to send samples first (I think this day in age it seems like the cart before the horse).

Also, look at their current sales.



#2 - August 02, 2010, 04:09 AM
« Last Edit: August 07, 2010, 05:58 AM by AE »
What's for pudding, Mimmy?

Illustration website:

http://www.puddintanesbrain.com

www.puddersputter.blogspot.com

Iceartist

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I can't believe they don't have submission guidelines? They all do.

No, they don't. This is the list I'm looking through: http://www.phylliscahill.com/greatsites/agents.html

Quote
Also, look at their sales current sales.

I don't know what this means.
#3 - August 02, 2010, 06:00 AM

Double W Illustrations
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Good morning!!

I have submitted to reps/agents and currently have one. The process of submitting to an agent is a long one. Most of the time being used in the preparation stage of submitting.

1. Have a portfolio of 10-15 pieces that clearly show your style and method of execution. I would suggest joining a critique group so that as you complete the work you can get objective feedback from your peers in regards to improving your work. You want to make sure that you are putting your best work forward.

2. Create a website that showcases your portfolio.

3. Get the 2010 Children's Writer's and Illustrator's Market. This book goes through listings of agents, magazines, and publishers. Company names, art directors, addresses and submission guidelines.

4. Join the SCBWI. A lot of information provided here as well for breaking into the industry. Even more listings of agents, magazines and publishers.

5. Put together a mailer and attempt to get work on your own. Approach publishers yourself. Agents are much more apt to take you on if you have proven that you are capable of getting and maintaining work on your own. Though this is not always the rule.

6. Research agents by visiting their websites and seeing what type of artists they represent. Many agents specialize in the children's industry. Some specialize in educational work. Some periodicals and books. Some all of the above. The book mentioned above is great to get that information. Some agents you can submit to electronically, while some prefer mailed submissions. If after researching the agents and their websites you can't find their submission policy, send an e-mail requesting it from them. You definitely will not get picked up by an agent if you aren't approaching them in the way that they prefer.

Their are a number of websites, blogs and articles online that go through the process and list publishers, agents and their submission requirements. If you can't buy the books listed. Then start with Googling for that info. If you really want the books, check your local library. In many instances your library will have a copy or two that you can check out to get you started!!! And probably other books that serve the same or similar purpose!

Hope that helps.
#4 - August 02, 2010, 08:40 AM

Iceartist

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Thank you very much everyone! I have a much better idea of how to proceed now.
#5 - August 02, 2010, 10:10 PM

Double W Illustrations
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Yay!! I'm glad we could be of help! Be sure to let us know how you are doing and progressing!!! Good luck!!
#6 - August 11, 2010, 11:52 AM

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If you don’t see how to submit your work on there site contact them first and ask How & Who. Do not assume its okay just to send an email with attachments  it may never be opened
Good luck

 Okay I just looked at the link you provided.
 I would do a search online on each Agent and check them out one by one.
 What I wrote on top still stands
#7 - August 21, 2010, 04:10 AM

Double W Illustrations
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Great article on this subject at this thread!

http://www.verlakay.com/boards/index.php?topic=45556.0
#8 - August 21, 2010, 02:55 PM

mattbequiet

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Thanks so much for this thread :) I'm going through the same stuff. I've been submitting and not hearing anything (though I finally got my first response! A rejection - but it was a response:) I appreciate this discussion board SO MUCH.

thanks again for asking the questions and to everyone for aswering them.

mw.
#9 - September 18, 2010, 06:06 PM

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This is late in posting- but it is late in the day and have not gotten anyting done and might as well read the boards-!!!

Remember an artist rep is different than a literay agent that also represents illustrators-
a Rep- takes a different cut, the spilt in adverstising cost with a rep is different then with a literary agent- a rep gets illustrators work in AD campaigns, covers for CDs, gift ware, other advertising and licensing- ie- snoopy or mary engelbright- on bed sheets and pjs
an agent in publishing is looking for book opportunities- and usually there will not be enough money in magazines for them to get involved -of course there is always cross over- but the rep is really interested in licensing- and marketing artwork on products.

also remember that art directors are usually open to postcard mailings with out an agent- not as important- and your chances are better if you submit a dummy- ie write and illustrate a picture book- what gets agents really excited- at least that was the word I was hearing at Big Sur and LA this year.
#10 - November 15, 2010, 04:31 PM

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