SCBWI's Blueboard - A Message & Chat Board

How much level of detail is too much?

Discussion started on

ecb

Guest
I do love simple illustrations too.

In general I'd have to say I prefer the highly rendered work... but, then, there's something almost miraculous in, for example, Sandra Boynton's work. How on Earth does she convey so much emotion and humor and story in those few simple lines?!  (I suppose it stands to reason that that mastery of simplicity baffles the author of 450-page novels. :dr)
#31 - September 05, 2010, 05:19 PM

Noodler & doodler
Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region sfnortheastbay
Do any of you published illustrators know if this is a trend? Do editors shy away from detail? Or have I just missed modern illustrators' books with lots of detail?
This is a great thread, Franziska~thanks for starting it! As a published writer/illustrator, I notice that styles come and go in cycles. I work several styles and lately I notice I've gotten more kudos on some of my simple line art. Go figure. While I love working in different ways, my ultimate goal is not to fit the trend but to tell the story in a visually compelling way that matches the story's flavor. That said, author/illustrators with genuine voice and have garnered lots of young fans such Elisa (whom I know personally) will probably always be in 'fashion.'

Quote
...Especially before they learn to read effectively, a Where's Waldo sort of book lets them loiter over a book like words would.
I agree, Maggie. I think kids navigate naturally toward those types of books because they can easily lose themselves in the visual stories. Do you remember Richard Scarry? His highly detailed books were among my kids' favorites.
#32 - September 06, 2010, 05:14 PM
Forthcoming books:
HONU AND MOA (fall 2018), author/illustrator
THANKU picture book anthology (fall 2019), contributor

"...my ultimate goal is not to fit the trend but to tell the story in a visually compelling way that matches the story's flavor. That said, author/illustrators with genuine voice and have garnered lots of young fans such Elisa (whom I know personally) will probably always be in 'fashion.'"

That's the ticket, ECM.

#33 - September 07, 2010, 04:54 AM
What's for pudding, Mimmy?

Illustration website:

http://www.puddintanesbrain.com

www.puddersputter.blogspot.com

Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region britishisles
Totally agree re Sandra Boynton. I don't dislike simple styles, in fact, some of my favourite illustrators aren't detailed in a busy kind of a way. Ian Falconer, for example, with his Olivia books – those aren't illustrations rammed full of tiny details, hidden or otherwise, and yet those illustrations have so much to say. I guess that's the key - to create illustrations that speak volumes. It's all in the execution, eh?!
#34 - September 07, 2010, 08:26 AM

m_stiefvater

Guest

I agree, Maggie. I think kids navigate naturally toward those types of books because they can easily lose themselves in the visual stories. Do you remember Richard Scarry? His highly detailed books were among my kids' favorites.

My kids STILL love Richard Scarry.
#35 - September 07, 2010, 01:17 PM

"... Especially before they learn to read effectively, a Where's Waldo sort of book lets them loiter over a book like words would."


I guess I still can't learn to "read" effectively. Neither can any kid I know (big or small) in this case.

:)
#36 - September 07, 2010, 02:30 PM
What's for pudding, Mimmy?

Illustration website:

http://www.puddintanesbrain.com

www.puddersputter.blogspot.com

DDHearn

Guest
This is a great conversation, and one that is close to my heart.  My work has always been very detailed and time consuming, and I've had less work to do the last few years.  I definitely have noticed a trend toward the more graphic styles.  Some of the art today harks back to a lot of work done in the fifties and early sixties, which had a real graphic quality to it.  As a child I never enjoyed that kind of work as much as the more detailed or classic look.  But that's just me.  It is difficult to do any style well.  Hopefully there is room for both, but I do think editors are more open to "simpler" styles now.

Thanks, everyone, for all the wonderful links. I will enjoy looking at them.

Diane
www.dianedawsonhearn.com 
#37 - September 16, 2010, 11:42 AM

Rock of The Westies
Roving Moderator
Poster Plus
  • **
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region nevada
Diane, whem you mentioned what you liked as a child, it rang true for me too. Even when watching cartoons, I much preferred Looney Tunes over Hanna Barbera. It really bothered me, even at 6 and 7 years old, to see Fred Flintstone walking by the same couch, and table while talking to Wilma or Barney. And Yogi bear walking by the same picnic table several times with lack of expression or detail didn't go unnoticed. Detail in any form of art has always been desirable to me since I was a young girl. While I enjoy a simple design where the text dictates the style, I love being captivated by beautifully crafted, detailed works. Sometimes I get lost in an image. When an illustration totally pulls me in and makes me forget about where I am and what I'm doing, I'm hooked.
#38 - September 16, 2010, 02:24 PM
« Last Edit: September 16, 2010, 02:27 PM by funny stuff »
Fur Balls & Feathers & Fins, Oh My! Animals Are My Kind of People
 www.cynthiakremsner.com

laureduthe

Guest
 i dig out this topic because it's so fabulous, as i was wondering and searching if there were contemporary illustrators in the market who still make highly rendered drawings.
thank all for your contributions : i discovered Fred Marcellino, Maggie Kneen, Roberto innocenti (just look at the nutcracker and pinocchio he illustrated !)

I would like to share with you another amazing illustrator : Scott Gustafson
http://www.scottgustafson.com/Portfolio_FT1.html
 
#39 - March 09, 2011, 01:32 PM

Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region britishisles
Wow! Thanks for sharing that. I love, love, love detail. I also love beautifully simple. But I think I get more time out of a detailed PB than I do one with simple lines.
#40 - March 09, 2011, 01:47 PM

Member.
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region rmc
  • SCBWI PAL
check out my friend- Richard Jesse Watson- I love the  detail in his illustrations- he has a new book out on the Lord's Prayer- http://www.richardjessewatson.com/
#41 - March 09, 2011, 08:04 PM

Rock of The Westies
Roving Moderator
Poster Plus
  • **
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region nevada
Julia, Richard's work is amazing! Lots of attention to detail and ha managed to keep it warm too.
#42 - March 10, 2011, 06:29 AM
Fur Balls & Feathers & Fins, Oh My! Animals Are My Kind of People
 www.cynthiakremsner.com

laureduthe

Guest
Richard Jesse Watson's work is very good !
Tank you Julia for the discovery !
#43 - June 11, 2011, 12:37 AM

Members:

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.