SCBWI's Blueboard - A Message & Chat Board

Illustration Submissions

Discussion started on

Artist Obscure
Member.
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region canadawest
Hi! I'm working on my illustration portfolio and I had a question for the experienced illustrators on this board. I'm working under the assumption that Art Directors want to see full-sized prints of my artwork. Which is fine, no problem right? Well I'm wanting to send off illustrations for a picture book I'm working on, and I'm wondering if it's reasonable to send full page spreads. The picture book I'm working on is 8" x 10". I have 2 - 3 full page spreads that I would like to send (along with other images) and I'm wondering: does it even makes sense to send out an image that's larger than 16" x 10" (larger because of not having full bleeds)? I'm not illustrating with my computer, so is the Art Director going to want to see my printer's marks ? On a lesser note, are these marks even that important any more with the use of digital media?  Thanks for any help that you can give!
#1 - February 02, 2012, 10:56 PM

I draw stuff for chocolates.
Member
Poster Plus
If you plan on sending a physical image smaller is better. I've heard from more than one AD that if they like an image they want to be able to file it easily. So anything large than letter size is a hassle.

Personally, I send out 4x6 postcards unless I'm sending a complete dummy. But a dummy would go to an editor not an art director.

Don't worry about printer marks and the technical stuff. ADs are looking for an ability to convey character, storyline and mastery of media.
#2 - February 03, 2012, 05:49 AM
patreon.com/wendymartin
Animal Totem Mandala 2016
The Story Circle 2016 (PiƱata)
Color and Conjure 2017 (Llewellyn)

Member.
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region britishisles
Hi Dani,

In my experience ADs like to see A4 colour prints (thats roughly 8x12"). I've never included crop marks - I think the marks will just distract from your work and they (the marks) would be useless to him/her anyway.

The printers marks are useful but usually only to the Printer (for finishing/cropping etc).

I would have the illustration printed onto A4 paper - the bleed should be incorporated into the artwork so shouldnt really be an issue. Bleed is like making sure you have enough pastry before you use a cookie cutter - it looks the same as the other pastry! Don't mark the bleed out in any way within the illustration, just make sure it's there. Same with the gutter for your double page spreads - don't draw it in - you can show that you're aware of the gutter issue by not placing crucial parts of the illustration over it (don't have a character slap bang in the middle of the spread and sliced in two by the gutter!)

I hope this is helpful x
#3 - February 03, 2012, 06:25 AM
Big Whoop! (Pow! Books) July 2014
Sorry, Dad! (Caterpillar Books) May 2014
Pi-Rat! (Caterpillar Books) Aug 2013

Creator of Mootastic Art and Children's Books
Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region nymetro
What Wendy and Maxi said. You do not need to send large prints or put printers marks on there.

If you're in the US, 8.5 x 11 is standard for print size in portfolios (some people show larger portfolios, but most are sized to show 8.5 x 11 prints). You don't need to send prints or a portfolio though. If you happen to live near a publisher and they have a portfolio drop off day (many publishers have stopped doing that, so check first), then you could drop off your portfolio for them to look at. Again, I'd go with a smaller size so it's easier for them to look at it at their desk.

If you don't live by a publisher or there aren't drop off days, you can send a postcard to show your style (this is what most people do). Pick your best image and put that on the front. On the back, you can use half of the postcard (the side you'd write the message on) to include another image or a crop from an image. Before you send the postcard, have your online portfolio ready, so that if they are interested, they can go to your site and see more images.

Make sure you have your contact info and website on the postcard. I like to put the info on both sides in case they put it on their bulletin board. That way no matter which side they like, the contact info is easy to see.

Sometimes it helps to see examples, so here are three of mine. I just did a postcard for the NY conference. I usually show a character on the front (which probably would have been a better decision for a conference), but this time I wanted to show that I could do a city, and put characters on the back. You can see that postcard here (scroll down): http://sruble.com/blog/?p=1019

The postcard I did last summer was much more popular (not surprising given the image). You can see that one here (it's the top image): http://sruble.com/blog/?p=989

This one is from January of 2010 and there's a business card shown too (the image from the business card was on a postcard the summer before that). These got a good response as well. http://sruble.com/blog/?p=307

I'm working on a new postcard now.

Good luck!
#4 - February 03, 2012, 09:45 AM
« Last Edit: February 03, 2012, 09:47 AM by Ani Louise »
Site - http://sruble.com
Twitter - http://twitter.com/StephanieRuble

picture book: EWE AND AYE (now available as an ebook!)

Artist Obscure
Member.
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region canadawest
Thanks for all the info. Some of this stuff I've heard already, but I like the reassurance from people who know what they are talking about (rather than just my memory). Just wondering about sending out full-paged spreads. How should I handle that... still on A4 or is there something else I should do?
#5 - February 03, 2012, 10:28 PM

Creator of Mootastic Art and Children's Books
Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region nymetro
I send my full spreads out on a postcard ... unless I'm sending a PB dummy, then I put them into the dummy so the editor can see the finishes along with the sketches.
#6 - February 04, 2012, 08:42 AM
Site - http://sruble.com
Twitter - http://twitter.com/StephanieRuble

picture book: EWE AND AYE (now available as an ebook!)

Simon_Turnbull

Guest
I used to have a ginormous flip portfolio that I would put A3 sized watercolour originals in. It was so big that it made the art look small mounted in the center. It was good for very painterly work that might lose some of its impact in reproduction.(But I wouldn't bother lugging a big portfolio like that around these days).  A couple of years ago I used a nice professional black document sleeve kind of thing with A4 prints in when I interviewed for a BG painting gig. You couldn't flip it open, it was just a sleeve.  I had to take the art out and lay it on a table.
#7 - February 05, 2012, 03:40 AM

Chris Jones

Guest
I tend to send my art samples like this:

If it's the first time I'm sending something to an Art Director or Editor, I'll put together a package with two or three 8.5"x11" tearsheets with assorted samples of my work, a letter, a few of my different promo postcards, and a business card.

If I've sent the Art Director my full package as above, I follow up with a 5x7" postcard every 3-4 months.

I just recently blogged about how I created my newest postcard here:
http://www.jonesid.com/2012/new-promotional-postcard-design/
#8 - March 13, 2012, 07:04 PM

Artist Obscure
Member.
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region canadawest
Thanks for all the good info. I have a couple of portfolios. One is huge and has seen better days (but is excellent for storing artwork) and another small one. I'm not sure if I'd get to use either unless I could find a Vancouver publisher to publish with. I'm still working on getting my portfolio in order. Talking longer than I would like, but it will be easier in the end with all this good info!
#9 - April 02, 2012, 11:19 PM

Members:

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.