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jpeg vs. png

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Anyone know if png photo files can be submitted to a magazine? I usually submit jpeg files, and know nothing about pngs. Is there a big difference between the two?
#1 - April 26, 2012, 02:31 PM
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You would need to check guidelines to see how each specific magazine wants images submitted. There is definitely a big difference between the two kinds of images. (Just don't ask me what the differences are. I only know that sometimes I have to use a .png image to get an image to post or work correctly, and sometimes I have to use a .jpg or a .gif.)
#2 - April 27, 2012, 10:09 PM
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Usually if a printer/magazine can take a .jpg they can take a .png too - I don't think there is too much difference between the two in terms of quality but I know that .png (24 bit) can save transparency (alpha channel) where .jpg can't, so if its a spot illustration, then I would save as a .png.

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#3 - April 28, 2012, 03:39 AM
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PNG is better but bigger (no-loss compression). So unless the magazine says otherwise, I'd send a very high res (300 dpi minimum) PNG file for print publications. But a very low-compression high-quality JPG would usually do.
#4 - April 28, 2012, 05:33 AM

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PNG is better but bigger (no-loss compression). So unless the magazine says otherwise, I'd send a very high res (300 dpi minimum) PNG file for print publications. But a very low-compression high-quality JPG would usually do.

^This.

PNG is "loss-less" i.e. you can open and close it a gazillion times and it won't lose pixels. JPEG/JPG is "lossy" or it can lose pixels after a certain amount of time. Usually this isn't a problem, especially if the dpi is high. For print, they also like TIFF, another "loss-less" format, but I would assume PNG works for that as well.

They will be able to use any large image (twice the size of intended printed size) of at least 160 dpi for magazines or 130 for newspapers (if I recall correctly. Double check me on that one) more than likely, although 300-333 dpi is preferred as this is "high-res" and will look good in print.  Don't send them 72-90 dpi! That is ONLY good for the web. It will look grainy and poor quality in print.

Hope that helps. I used to work in the graphic design and account management side of print publishing and advertising for awhile. I would check their submission guidelines or ask to speak with the art director for the project (if they've requested the images), to make sure this is what they need.
#5 - April 28, 2012, 12:27 PM
« Last Edit: April 28, 2012, 12:29 PM by andregirl »
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Thanks for the input, everyone! As I submit more NF, I'm finding that I need to know more about photographs. Thanks for making it a little more clear. :)
#6 - April 28, 2012, 01:26 PM
« Last Edit: April 28, 2012, 01:28 PM by Sara »
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