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Mums who never ever yell?

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We don't yell here, or raise voices, or believe in physical punishment, or really most any punitive responses.  We talk. . . and there is the Look and the Full Name uttered in the don't-try-it-I'm-an-old-bird-who-broke-all-the-rules tone.  I also am fully open with them. They know I did drugs, stole, & overall did a bunch of stupid things. They also know that I worked 3 jobs to put myself thru college, and I expect them to do their absolute best, admit when they screw up, and try to fix it. All talk on any subject, no punishments. It's worked beautifully on two kids so far.

When my m-i-l or friends question my strategy, I point at my daughter (now 19 yr old, honor program, uni scholarship to top tier school) and my eldest son (now 14, does chores without asking, straight As). They both know that they can call me on my behaviour too. My son tonight told me I was "acting shorter than normal" & suggested that I "get to bed a little early" bc travel last week seemed to "have left me frazzled." I paused, apologized, and thanked him. Mutual respect means that yelling is unnecessary.  I don't accept disrespect, so why would I show it to the people who are the absolute center of my life & heart? It's not how I was raised, but it is my parenting philosophy, and it works for us.

If they were in danger--ie bus coming, bear they don't see--I would holler a warning, but that's different than yelling. 

ETA: Spouse & I have also never had a yelling argument. I've raised my voice at him twice in 15yrs of marriage.  OTOH, in prior relationships, I've been loud & mean & thrown things & changed the locks & was actually barred from 3 different bars in town.  I surrendered that sort of destructive emotion . . . except, yanno, in traffic at other drivers or sometimes in re: the publishing industry. I just don't allow it in my personal life.
#31 - May 08, 2013, 05:31 PM
« Last Edit: May 08, 2013, 05:37 PM by Melissa Marr »

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We don't yell here, or raise voices, or believe in physical punishment, or really most any punitive responses.  We talk. . . and there is the Look and the Full Name uttered in the don't-try-it-I'm-an-old-bird-who-broke-all-the-rules tone.  I also am fully open with them. They know I did drugs, stole, & overall did a bunch of stupid things. They also know that I worked 3 jobs to put myself thru college, and I expect them to do their absolute best, admit when they screw up, and try to fix it. All talk on any subject, no punishments. It's worked beautifully on two kids so far.


Okay, this is off the point but it's my thread so I'm allowed to veer off the path, right?! I'm intrigued, because this sounds a lot like the way I was brought up. We were never punished. There was no 'go to your room' or 'you're grounded!' type stuff. There was talk and we felt guilty if we misbehaved. But my sister and I both kind of went off the rails... which makes me wonder how my parents could have done things differently so it might not have happened (mainly because I'm trying to figure out how to prevent my kids doing the same!). What did your parents do differently? Or do you think your off-the-rails and mine was nothing to do with parenting?
#32 - May 08, 2013, 06:29 PM

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Can I jump off topic with you? I was raised this way, too, Franzilla, but I never ever ever ever strayed from the path I was supposed to follow.

I completely expected to raise my own children this way, but said toddler came along and needs absolute structure and consistency and consequences. My babes #1 & 3 would thrive in a household like I was raised in... and we try to give them that experience as best as we can, but my parenting is not what I thought it would be. All we can do is raise the kids we were given as best we can, right? (With healthy doses of  :wine and :chocolate: !)
#33 - May 08, 2013, 06:54 PM

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So true, it depends a lot on each child's personality. I just wish I could figure out if my parents went wrong and if they did, how, because I really don't want to have to watch my kids do the stuff I did! I'm going grey just thinking about it...

Pass me some of that.  :wine Aaah, that's better!
#34 - May 08, 2013, 06:59 PM

I don't believe any mom can be a non-yeller in an emergency (say, if their kid is running into a busy street, or lurching toward a hot stove, or any of 1001 other possible safety crises). In a non-emergency, I think it's determined by the interaction between the child's and the parent's personality. A very calm, rational, verbal child + an equally calm mom = a low-yell scenario. A wild, impulsive child +  a mom with a more dramatic personality = increased chance of yelling.   
 :bwa   :drum:
#35 - May 08, 2013, 08:22 PM

My mother almost never yelled. I can only think of one or two times growing up when I heard her yell. She grew up in a house with a lot of arguing and craved a more peaceful home life. She is a great mom, and I wish I was more like her in many ways.
#36 - May 08, 2013, 09:18 PM

There was a mom at my mommy and me workout class a few years ago that believed in a theory of parenting called something like child directed parenting or consequence driven parenting or something like that. Anyway, I know VERY little on the subject (obviously since I don't know the name even  :) ) other than what I heard from her as we ran around exercising but you could look it up. She said that she never disciplined her kids at all. She and her husband believed that the consequences would naturally dictate the kid's behavior. Like if she wanted to wear something crazy and got teased then she wouldn't wear it again and they wouldn't have to say anything about it. We grilled her one day (nicely and borne only of curiosity!) and she happily explained that if the child was told the street was dangerous because cars might not see her, and her daughter ran out in the street anyway, if she got hit (or hopefully not hit but just scared) by a car she'd never do it again. She said she never yells and that she only explains dangers and things and then its up to the kid. It's her life and she has to live with the consequences of her decision making. The kid also got to pick her own punishments and times when she should be punished, and she would. Whether that is the goal of that parenting philosophy or whether it was actually achievable I don't know, but in the year we worked out together I never saw her even say something sternly to her kid who was 2 or 3 years old. For the record, her kid seemed happy and healthy and well adjusted and it worked for them, so I think it's possible. I wish I could remember the exact name of the parenting philosophy for you.

My house is quite the opposite. Lol. I'm emotional. My kids are emotional. We're all lucky to have my very calm, hard to ruffle husband or we'd probably live in a madhouse.

Good luck in the research! I think you can make it believable to have a non-yelling parent, especially if you give them a good reason for the behavior, like you said.
#37 - May 09, 2013, 06:07 AM

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I know a family who uses that philosophy, Adia.  I think it depends on the combination of personalities (parent/child), but in the case of the family I know, it doesn't work very well.  Her oldest is a good kid, but he has very few limits, and he does stupid and thoughtless stuff all the time.  He almost got expelled in 2nd grade for hurting a couple of his classmates -- and while his mom would say (and has said) that he got the consequences for his actions, that doesn't help the other two kiddos much (who, fortunately, weren't seriously hurt).  My personal opinion is that it's a parenting method which puts the responsibility on other adults -- in this boy's case, the teachers or any parents who happened to be around.  The funny thing is that this mom has asked me numerous times how I 'got' my own son (same age, same class) to be so respectful, thoughtful, and caring.  Well, because I actually parent him, that's how.  In 2nd grade (which was 3 years ago), she gave me a very similar explanation of their philosophy to the one you mentioned above, and she called it child-directed parenting.  I did gently point out that most kids don't have the wisdom to build their own safe boundaries, which is why they have parents (ha).

Anyway, I'm clearly not a fan of the philosophy, but I do realize it's not entirely unbiased (as I have seen only the one family attempting it).  As for yelling, I don't yell *at* my kids -- when I yell (which is perhaps once or twice a year), it's to express my own frustration (like I mentioned above).  I definitely believe people can parent calmly and wisely without yelling...but for me, I need that outlet now and then (I've actually stood on our landing and just wailed before -- it got the kiddos' attention, and then I could be calm, heh).  I'm fortunate, however, that my kiddos both respond well to my personal parenting style, so I don't have to yell at them. :)
#38 - May 09, 2013, 08:17 AM
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What did your parents do differently? Or do you think your off-the-rails and mine was nothing to do with parenting?

I grew up rural. My parents believed in yelling, spanking, punishments that included withholding things & adding chores, but honestly, I don't think their parenting was why I went off the rails.  My mother got sick (heart condition), & while she was in bed sick, I had the misfortune of being raped. I isn't want to "burden" my parents so I kept it to myself (friends helped me hide my bruises & got my to a doctor). I thought I had it under control, but ended up w an eating disorder, drug hobby, & general bad choices. By the time my mother was well enough, I was a bit messed up & we YELLED.  None of that was her fault. Sometimes even with the best parenting intentions, things go awry.

As to my methodology on non-punitive parenting, I researched A LOT because I wanted to be a great mother. I still read parenting books (absurd quantities of them actually). I think my parenting style works. If anyone is angry enough to raise voices, s/he is expected to walk away until calm returns. That goes for parents & children both. Raised voices, spanking, yelling are often a result of frustration, so we have "safety valves" to address that very human tendency.  When frustrated or upset, we have options
a) exercise until temper cools,
b) write it down and revise in order to get the emotion out--this can be in a journal or in a letter to the source of the upset/anger,
c) research and present the "case" to support the verdict (parents) or to petition for a revised verdict (kids) if the parental ruling is seemingly based on emotion/fear or "because I'm the parent."

The unexpected bonus of this is that my older kids are both fit (she is a half-marathon runner/swimmer/climber/snowboarder; he does tennis/climbing/snowboarding), perfect grades on essays, and very confident in their opinions bc they are well-practiced in debate.

She said that she never disciplined her kids at all. She and her husband believed that the consequences would naturally dictate the kid's behavior. . . .  if the child was told the street was dangerous because cars might not see her, and her daughter ran out in the street anyway, if she got hit (or hopefully not hit but just scared) by a car she'd never do it again. She said she never yells and that she only explains dangers and things and then its up to the kid. It's her life and she has to live with the consequences of her decision making. The kid also got to pick her own punishments and times when she should be punished, and she would.

 
I think that she misunderstood the philosophy if she let her children enter in danger. Part of a non-punitive parenting philosophy is an extreme amount of information.  Frex, when my daughter wanted to go to Boston for uni, she needed to research crime stats, safe housing options, the public transit system, and pass a quiz on safety measures while running (bc she runs daily). When she wanted to go to China with a school group, there was overview on passport safety, the role of the embassy, and immunizations/laws/dietary considerations. There is a GIANT difference between respecting a child enough to trust them and failure to arm them with the tools necessary to make wise choices. Regardless of the parenting style (punitive, non-punitive, or a combo thereof) protecting the child is a parent's duty.

In a non-emergency, I think it's determined by the interaction between the child's and the parent's personality. A very calm, rational, verbal child + an equally calm mom = a low-yell scenario. A wild, impulsive child +  a mom with a more dramatic personality = increased chance of yelling.   

Agreed completely!  With my teen son, I know that logic is enough.  My daughter, otoh, is emotionally fluid. When I became her mother, she was having anger issues (her bio-mother is a substance user w mental health issues), and she had extreme separation anxiety if we were apart bc she needed the stability I represented to her. I home schooled for several years bc of it. She has yelled at me, but I would never yell back. It would be unhealthy for her if I did, so it was simply not on the table.  A lot of my adopting this philosophy was because it was what she needed. It worked, so I kept at it with both kids (and will do so with the baby and the future-baby).

. . . so to the original question, yeah, non-yelling can work beautifully, but I have lots of friends who parent in more traditional ways and their kids are fine too :)  Like most things in life, there is no "one answer."

JMO, of course!
#39 - May 09, 2013, 09:18 AM

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My kids are still young, and I'm still learning how to be a parent, but I can say that I started out this way. I didn't raise my voice, let my daughter find her own way...but then it all fell apart. I'm not sure when, exactly, but this is our family:

1 dramatic, stubborn, fiery 6 year old girl + 1 dramatic, not-so-stubborn mom = lots of noise, back and forth
1 dramatic, stubborn, fiery 6 year old girl + 1 chill, worrisome, methodical father = much giving-in, but less noise
1 happy-go-lucky, impulsive & wants-to-please 4 year old boy + 1 dramatic, not-so-stubborn mom = fairly quiet discussions
1 happy-go-lucky, impulsive & wants-to-please 4 year old boy + 1 chill, worrisome, methodical father = lots of frustration when things go wrong

And now that I've typed all that up, I can see why we have the problems we do. But rest assured, it's getting easier every year, now that they're out-growing their toddler-ness. Mostly, the drama is all between my daughter and I, and I'm not sure how/when it'll cool down.

In the meantime, there is always wine and chocolate.
#40 - May 09, 2013, 09:38 AM
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My sis and I, who honestly didn't have much yelling coming, were raised by parents who were screamers, especially my mom.

My mother was a shrieking screamer, oh boy. My father got very quiet when he was angry. I took after him.
I don't know what's better, but my kids have often said they're glad I don't yell or even raise my voice. Come to think of it, I don't even lower it. I walk away. Oh, dear. I don't know if this is good. It's just what I have to do.

Like Marcia wrote so eloquently- our upbringing has a lot to do with how we raise the next generation, whether we go the opposite direction or do as we had seen it done.
#41 - May 09, 2013, 10:44 AM
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 :hahaha This is such an entertaining thread! Thanks for starting it, Franzilla.

I yell with sudden danger--running into the street, for ex.--because it's the fastest way to communicate. Words and tone and volume carry the same message.

Otherwise, I threaten to torture them in creative ways. My default is to say I'll duct tape them to the garage door, then hit the up/down button till they're dizzy. This makes them exchange a nervous glance--and stop fighting. I go on to various other possibilities--eat the rest of last night's failed-new-recipe casserole, give the cat a bath with their tongues so it'll be like a spa day for her, etc. They move progressively closer to each other as I go on, eventually throwing their arms dramatically around each other. By the time I get to the ultimate threat--If you don't unload the dishwasher right now, young lady, I'LL DANCE--they scream and run together to the dishwasher and unload it cooperatively and with great drama. When they shoot glances over at me, I strike a ballet pose and [word censored] an eyebrow and they shriek and grab the silverware.

So for us, humor and, you know--torture, get them to stop picking on each other.

One other thing--when they were younger both hated having their hair washed. We had the house rule that if a kid put something (ketchup) in the other kid's hair, the aggressor got his/her hair washed. Only had to do that once.
#42 - May 09, 2013, 11:05 AM
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 :haha :haha :haha I just saw that I had a word censored in my last post--never happened to me before. I always figured it was only a matter of time before I went bad....  :trenchcoat
#43 - May 09, 2013, 11:09 AM
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. . . so to the original question, yeah, non-yelling can work beautifully, but I have lots of friends who parent in more traditional ways and their kids are fine too :)  Like most things in life, there is no "one answer."

I definitely believe this.  And even though the one family I know who uses child-directed parenting (or their version of it) seems to have struggles I think could be avoided, it's still their choice.  And their boys are good kids.

My parenting style works for me, and I feel strongly about it -- but it works in part because of my own conviction (I think) and because it works with the combination of personalities of myself and my kiddos.  (My husband definitely helps in all this, but in truth, I am the one who deals with 99% of the parenting issues.)

My own parents were not yellers, either...but my dad had anger issues.  He never directed his anger toward any of us (my brother, me, or my mom), but his anger was still something that intimidated all of us.  At the same time, he's the one who taught me how to talk to people, kids included.  He showed us how to be vulnerable with others, also including kids.  I think I can be so open with my own kiddos because of things I experienced with him.  My mom, who is quiet, thoughtful, gentle (and yet very strong) never raised her voice.  She did not handle much of the discipline or even parenting issues.  My dad didn't really allow her to play a huge role in that -- but today, she is the one I talk to when I have questions or concerns in my parenting role.
#44 - May 09, 2013, 01:53 PM
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Another non-yeller here. As a kid, wife, or mom. But am an only child raising an only child. Never had to raise the volume much!
#45 - May 09, 2013, 03:01 PM
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I grew up rural. My parents believed in yelling, spanking, punishments that included withholding things & adding chores, but honestly, I don't think their parenting was why I went off the rails.  My mother got sick (heart condition), & while she was in bed sick, I had the misfortune of being raped. I isn't want to "burden" my parents so I kept it to myself (friends helped me hide my bruises & got my to a doctor). I thought I had it under control, but ended up w an eating disorder, drug hobby, & general bad choices. By the time my mother was well enough, I was a bit messed up & we YELLED.  None of that was her fault. Sometimes even with the best parenting intentions, things go awry.



I think you're right, it's never going to be ONLY about the parenting. I certainly don't lay all the blame at my parents' feet for my behaviour. I guess it's partly because I don't understand why I went off the rails myself! (Also, I'm very sorry to hear you went through that and didn't have the possibility to process it or address it. Can't imagine how tough that must have been on you.) 

AmberLough, I wish I could write out my family as clearly as that. It does look like a cool way to figure out what causes family members to butt heads.

Dewsanddamps, I'm baffled. What on earth did you do with your eyebrow to make the word censored?! I can't make any word fit there that makes any sense!

By the way, this afternoon my five-year-old's behaviour was so bad it made me furious. (We'd had friends over and for the last hour she had behaved so rudely, and then refused to say goodbye at the end. This, after my having spent weeks – weeks! – arranging this playdate.) But I didn't yell. I told her I was furious through gritted teeth. And then, just because it was on my mind, I asked her, "You know you've behaved badly. If I was to punish you, what punishment do you think might work?" She replied, "I think you should take away that doll. You know, the one I don't really like. Because that's fine by me!" He he he. In the end we agreed that she'd draw an apology card to the little girl who visited.

I will undoubtedly yell again in my parenting life, but this thread has already stopped me doing it once. Maybe there's a chance I might become like my non-yelling character myself!
#46 - May 09, 2013, 08:02 PM

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I remember talking about punishments with my mom at one time.  Being sent to our room was a big one, although she said and I remember that I never thought that was punishment, because I would happily read a book during my punishment time and never asked when I was through.  They eventually discovered making me sit in a chair without a book was the big punishment.

As for yelling, my mom was not really a yeller, it was more the tone of her voice and how she said your name.  If she said just your first name, it was just a gentle warning, first and middle name - watch out, the entire name - run for the hills. 

My father on the other hand was a very stern disciplinarian.  Do it this way and do it now.  If he raised his voice and yelled, we literally would run if we were not caught in his grasp.  I recall one time my younger brother and I hid out in a wooded section behind our house for what seemed like a half-hour, may have only been fifteen minutes.  I have no idea what the incident was about, but when Dad yelled and said a cuss word, just move out of the way. 

Unfortunately I tended to have the same temper problem when I was in my twenties and we could get into some great screaming matches.  To the point that my mother would come in and tell us both to be quiet and go into different rooms. 

When I taught school, there were days the kids would ask me if I took my mean pills.  Those were the days I just could not stand the little things going on that should not have been, they knew when my limit had been pushed, but seldom yelled unless it was to be heard over a loud crowd.  I tend to have a loud voice anyway. 
#47 - May 09, 2013, 09:01 PM
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Dewsanddamps, I'm baffled. What on earth did you do with your eyebrow to make the word censored?! I can't make any word fit there that makes any sense.

Franzilla, I raised my eyebrow. Begins with a 'c', ends with '-ock'.  :whistle
#48 - May 10, 2013, 07:07 AM
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Oooo, dews, you're bad. Bad to the bone.

I must admit, my household was not always quiet when my kids were younger. But I also had my deadly calm voice, which probably got more results. And I had many discussions with my sons  explaining why their behavior wasn't appropriate. They understood why they were in trouble and why their choice was wrong. They're all in their 20's now, and making wonderful life decisions.

I loved reading how Melissa dealt with this. I wish all parents who had a child-centered philosophy raised their kids as well as she has hers. Working in a public school, I can tell you many don't.
#49 - May 10, 2013, 09:42 AM

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I just saw that I had a word censored in my last post--never happened to me before. I always figured it was only a matter of time before I went bad....

:chicken We're pretty stern about roostering eyebrows around here, let me tell you!
#50 - May 10, 2013, 09:56 AM

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Oh shoot, this has nothing to with the post, but I've had many a good laugh over the "naughtiness" on this board. Dewsandamps, I got the word by context and got the giggles and now "roostering eyebrows..." Oh have I've got a side ache... :haha

I've got to use that sometime...roostering eyebrows... :hahaha
#51 - May 10, 2013, 10:26 AM
« Last Edit: May 10, 2013, 11:18 AM by J.Swan »
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Oh shoot, this has nothing to with the post, but I've had many a good laugh over the "naughtiness" on this board. Dewsandamps, I got the word by context and got the giggles and now "roostering eyebrows..." Oh have I've got a side ache... :haha

I've got to use that sometime...roostering eyebrows... :hahaha

Me too! So funny.
#52 - May 10, 2013, 02:13 PM

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I think the "Glare of Death" is just as effective as yelling and sometimes more so. Of course you have to have the child looking in your direction for the glare to work, but sometimes you can use it on someone else's child (like in the mall, at a restaurant, etc.) when the mom/dad should be yelling and don't.   :smokhead:
#53 - May 10, 2013, 11:27 PM
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My cousin, who was born deaf, would just stop looking at her mother when she was being given the glare of death. We all laugh about it now.

All the things I said I wouldn't do as a mom, I am doing them now. I have turned into my mother :)

Vijaya
#54 - May 11, 2013, 05:41 AM
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I have turned into my mother :)
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You make eggplant also?   :fridge
#55 - May 11, 2013, 04:02 PM
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I was thinking of this thread earlier this week when my teen son accused me of "silent yelling" at him.  It stopped me mid-step.

Me: Say again?
Him: Silent yell. It's that thing you do where I KNOW you're not happy, but you aren't yell-yelling.
Me: Okaaay.
Him: You stare at me and push your lips together and your one eyebrow goes up. Then you WAIT. It's a yell, but with your face...& I have to say what I did or didn't do instead of you yelling it like X's mom does. I can't pretend I don't KNOW what I did with your way. It's kind of like the dogs do when they're doing dominance challenges. You're the alpha dog, except as a girl-mom-person with eyebrows. The dogs don't use eyebrows.

So, umm, I guess "yelling" is something I do "with [my] face" . . . and it's best explained in relation to Rottweilers but with eyebrows.  It took effort not to giggle at his explanation.   
#56 - June 19, 2013, 09:35 PM

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The silent yell--lol. Kids know when a parent isn't pleased, no matter how the reaction comes out. But it's good--they SHOULD be able to tell when they've crossed the line. Even if it's eyebrow tricks or alpha dog stares.

Actually, I just want to download the parenting part of your brain, Melissa. I think about natural consequence parenting all the time--no, you don't let your kid run out in the road, but you do let them examine the natural consequences of a choice so they know full well what they're getting into--and sometimes they do need to experience things to really get it. (Small things, of course--let them go outside without their coat if they insist so they get it that it's cold. Then when it's something big, maybe they'll realize you know what you're talking about.) Humans learn by watching and listening, but also by experience, and helping kids have good experiences where they're making choices and seeing positive results is really important. (I love the unexpected benefits your kids have had from learning to deal with their tempers!)

Um...yeah. I know all this in theory. Doing it all the time, though...  :paperbag I think it gets easier as kids get older and more rational, though. My house is a lot quieter than it used to be, anyway. :)
#57 - June 19, 2013, 10:34 PM

I was homeschooled, so I got to see a lot of the more extreme side of the 'never yell and never ever say no' style of parenting within some of the homeschooling groups we frequented. And let me tell you, those kids were the absolute worst to be around. Not only were they spoiled and self-entitled, but even as another kid you couldn't get mad or yell at them because their mothers would swoop in and throw a fit because you were 'damaging their kid's psyche/self-esteem'. Meanwhile their kids were running rampant and hurting people and breaking things... It used to make me so mad!

My parents took the strict approach when my siblings and I were younger, but they deliberately eased off as we got older. Also, my mom took the time to explain things she regretted doing in her past, and why, and that helped me understand and navigate around certain things. I think it worked out rather well for us - none of us ever got in much real trouble. Though, I do think that my dad was a little too strict and unrealistic when it came to our education - it made my sister and me into terrible, neurotic perfectionists, and caused my brother to rebel against schoolwork. We all evened out by the time we each went to college, but it was hard to let that perfectionistic streak go, even when it was hurting much, much more than it was helping.
That being said, I wouldn't trade the homeschooling - it had its issues, but it also had an abundance of blessings and strengths. Especially when I hear some of the horror stories from my public schooled peers. Yikes!
#58 - June 20, 2013, 06:37 AM

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Actually, I just want to download the parenting part of your brain, Melissa. I think about natural consequence parenting all the time--no, you don't let your kid run out in the road, but you do let them examine the natural consequences of a choice so they know full well what they're getting into--and sometimes they do need to experience things to really get it. . . .

Thank you. That means a lot (more than I can adequately say). I could talk parenting all day. It's the most important part of my life and the only thing in life that I ever feel I'm genuinely *designed* to do. My next best was teaching, but I think that was bc I felt maternal with my students. I'm a passable writer, and I was a fair waitress, & fair to middling bartender. I'm a decent wife, and I'm hit or miss in the friends area. Motherhood though? That's my zone. I feel like I can  (and have) handle any challenge tossed my way in that arena. It's like my life experiences were about training me to be their mom. Plus,  I research more for motherhood than anything else in my life (including graduate degrees).  THEY are my career. The teaching before & now the author bit are my jobs.
#59 - June 20, 2013, 09:54 AM

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Wow I would love to learn that silent yell, Melissa! I know I've got a "look" but I'm not sure I approach that. I currently have the pleasure (not) of having a non-yelling parent's child in my class. He is by far the most poorly behaved. I'm not sure there is a direct correlation, but it is interesting. Melissa, maybe you should be writing a book on parenting, especially parenting teenagers. My oldest starts high school in the fall --yikes! If you've got the natural talent, please share with those of us that may be more challenged in that area :)
#60 - June 20, 2013, 11:45 AM

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