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Picture books with long time frames

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It's pretty difficult to do with 32-pages but I'm wondering what are some good examples of picture books where there is either a long (or interesting) journey and/or a long time span.

In a way, a picture book that could be made into something larger than picture book; like a book, or even books.
#1 - July 29, 2014, 03:21 PM

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This one isn't my cup of tea, but THE GIVING TREE
#2 - July 29, 2014, 03:32 PM
I've Got Eyes! - Amicus Ink (August 2018)

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This one isn't my cup of tea, but THE GIVING TREE
That's one of the first ones that came to mind. I would place it in the same category as "I Love You Forever" by Robert Munsch, because the main character(s) grow up.

I was kinda wondering about WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE because Max did sail for a long time and he did party with the wild things although that was perceived time rather than actual time. Are there other books that have a long time frame from the main character's point of view?
#3 - July 29, 2014, 03:44 PM

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There's a reason there aren't many: lots of young kids have no real concept of 'a long time.' There's a certain age roundabout when kids start to understand the idea of next year or in a few years' time, so your picture book might refer to things that they can't yet grasp. That's why so few PBs cover years in the story timeline. That being said, I don't think it necessarily means kids don't enjoy reading about something that might take years, it's all about how the time frame is presented.
#4 - July 29, 2014, 05:05 PM

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That was the first thing that came to my mind, "Where the Wild Things Are." 

There's "The Apple Pie Tree" which goes through the seasons and "Maple" and "Sophie's Squash."

I guess it really depends on what you consider a long time span.
#5 - July 30, 2014, 08:26 AM

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The Little House by Virginia Lee Burton takes place over a century or so, with the great-great-granddaughter of the builder moving to house out to the country. Many books with longer time frames than the common day or week are capped at a year, encompassing the cycle of seasons. The Little House feels timeless by starting with the cycle of seasons, losing it in the city and returning to that familiar cycle by the end.
From Recess: http://www.recess.ufl.edu/transcripts/2006/0202.shtml
"Although this may seem a statement on the unhappy results of unchecked urban growth and the blessedness of the rural life, Burton claimed her primary goal in writing this book was to convey the idea of historical perspective and the passage of time in terms a young reader could understand."

I'm not sure she succeeded in her goal of showing the passage of time to most young readers, but she certainly created a great work that will stand the test of time.
#6 - July 30, 2014, 11:12 AM

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I'm not sure if this what you're looking for, but Charlie's Superhero Underpants tells the story of a boy who travels the world to retrieve clothes that have been blown off the clothesline, including his beloved underpants. There's not real indication of time, but it's obviously a long (and interesting and funny) journey!
#7 - July 30, 2014, 12:59 PM

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A Fine, Fine School by Sharon Creech takes place over much of a school year. It's more recent than the other examples. Diary of a Worm has a longish time frame too.
#8 - August 04, 2014, 07:39 AM
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House Held Up by Trees by Ted Kooser illustrated by Jon Klassen has a long time journey with a house as well.
#9 - August 04, 2014, 08:27 PM
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Prancing, Dancing Lily by Marsha Diane Arnold and illustrated by John Manders, covers a dairy cow who globetrots trying to find her true self as she's next in line to inherit bell cow responsibilities and all who know her question if she's the right one for the job.  It covers a pretty long time frame but it is handled in such a way, that one could never tell.
 
Another is Dear Mrs. Larue (Letters from Obedience School) by Mark Teague. It's cleverly written and illustrated.

"The Princess and The Pig" by Jonathan Emmett, illustrated by Poly Bernatene, spans over one decade of story and the illustrations are as fun as the text.
 
#10 - August 05, 2014, 06:32 AM
« Last Edit: August 05, 2014, 05:39 PM by Cynthia Kremsner »
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I thought of this thread last night as I read ZOG by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler to my kids. It covers a lot more than five years but you wouldn't notice unless you were thinking about it, as I was! It follows dragons as they learn new skills, year one, year two etc - and while the dragons are growing up so is a little princess. In the end the little girl is old enough to be a doctor, so I'm guessing if you wanted to put a figure on it, the book covers around 15 years?!


I don't think my kids even notice that time is passing in the book.
#11 - August 05, 2014, 06:46 AM

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How about OTTO GROWS DOWN. About six years pass (backwards!).  ::-)
#12 - August 05, 2014, 10:51 PM
BACKHOE JOE, HarperCollins, 2014
FAMOUSLY PHOEBE, Sterling, 2017
ALL IN A DROP, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2019

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Mo Willems' CITY DOG, COUNTRY FROG covers one year. It's clearly marked by seasons, though--almost like chapters would be. I think that kids get the passage of time if the story is clearly anchored by markers that they understand, like seasons.


Other times, it's enough to just know that a "really long time passed," like with WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE. Kids see the night turn to day and back into night again, etc., but the "in and out of weeks and almost over a year," probably doesn't click with young kids--just knowing it's a very long time is enough, since being away from a parent for any amount of time can seem long to a child.
#13 - August 06, 2014, 01:14 AM
FLYING THE DRAGON (Charlesbridge, 2012)
A LONG PITCH HOME (Charlesbridge, 2016)

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THE LORAX by Dr Seuss
#14 - August 06, 2014, 03:22 PM
I've Got Eyes! - Amicus Ink (August 2018)

www.juliemurphybooks.com

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Salina Yoon's Penguin and Pinecone! Love me some Penguin:) And Salina, too:)
#15 - August 06, 2014, 03:30 PM
DREAM JOBS IN SPORTS PSYCHOLOGY (Rosen 2018)
THE GROSS SCIENCE OF BAD BREATH AND CAVITIES (Rosen 2019)

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Salina Yoon's Penguin and Pinecone! Love me some Penguin:) And Salina, too:)


Good one, Jayca! And me too.  :love5: :love5: :love5: :love5: :love5: :love5: :love5: :love5: :love5: :love5: :thanks (that last one just to make sure she knows I'm not getting too soppy!)
#16 - August 06, 2014, 04:01 PM

Thanks for all these responses :D

#17 - September 02, 2014, 03:20 AM

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