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Unusual PB formats

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Figgy

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Hi all-

I'm looking for some examples of PBs written in unconventional formats:  letters, journal/diary entries, postcards, etc...  For example, at least one of the Toot and Puddle books was written as a series of postcards and The Gardener is a series of letters.  Can anyone think of other examples? ???   In general, do you think there's a market for these?  Thanks in advance for any help/thoughts/suggestions!
#1 - March 09, 2006, 08:17 AM

DeAnn M.O.

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I think there's always a market for innovative writing and formating. Try POSTCARDS FROM OUTER SPACE. I used it to teach my third graders about the solar system. I'll keep thinking and chime back in if I think of more.
#2 - March 09, 2006, 08:26 AM

lurban

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Dear Mrs. LaRue: Letters from Obedience School is another great example -- letters from a dog. 
#3 - March 09, 2006, 08:37 AM

Barbara Eveleth

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Black and White is a four storyboarder (four stories going on at once) that is very well done, although I think that it is over many kids heads (and many adults heads, as well).

As for a more delicate story try "The Jolly Postman."  Real letters are pocketed away and each one drives the story forward.
#4 - March 09, 2006, 10:12 AM

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Check out Karen Orloff's I WANNA IGUANA. It's a wonderfully funny picture book written in notes, back and forth, between boy and mother.

~Della
#5 - March 09, 2006, 01:06 PM
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DIARY OF A WORM, (and other diary ones) by Doreen Cronin.
It's not too unusual, but there are entry dates at the top of the pages.
#6 - March 09, 2006, 01:24 PM
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wicked

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My daughter had a book I absolutely adored "The Jolly Postman: Or, Other People's Letters" by the Ahlburgs.  It had a traditional story with pictures but the pages had pockets and that had mail in them. Letters and post cards you could open and read and those told a sub story to the one about the postman going through mother goose and fairy tale land delivering books to cindrella and other characters.

 
#7 - March 16, 2006, 08:58 AM

emykate03

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Zen Shorts by Jon J Muth. It's really beautiful. The panda, Stillwater, plays with three children. He tells each of them a different short story from Zen Buddhist literature. They are little parables that he applies to the children. I wish I thought of it!
#8 - March 16, 2006, 11:46 AM

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PLANTZILLA  (I think it's similar to the WANNA IGUANA). It's in letters. My six year old loves it and has been really interested in reading the letters herself, which she normally doesn't do with Pbs.

Is there a market? I think so. If they are brilliantly written, I'd think they stand a good as chance as any other pb.
#9 - March 19, 2006, 08:08 AM

barb

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On the question of marketability, I would say YES.  The pb I just sold to Holiday House has the "author" of the story as the main character, insisting that the illustrator is drawing all the wrong pictures.  I would say, in general, unconventional -- especially if unique and innovative -- would be very marketable.  (Did you notice that a lot of the examples above are of exchanges of letters?  Perhaps that's a format that's been done enough at this point... but who knows?)
#10 - March 19, 2006, 09:12 AM
« Last Edit: March 19, 2006, 05:12 PM by barb »

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I have an unusual picture book coming out in the Fall.  The story is told in diary format (that's not so unusual), but the illustrations are really unique.  At least I've never seen anything like them. ( BTW, I don't deserve any credit for the technique--it was my editor's idea.)  The story is about an imaginary journey, so the technique is a mix of realism and fantasy.  The main character seems to be there and not there at the same time.  We're putting the finishing touches on it this week.


Ellen Jackson
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#11 - March 19, 2006, 08:32 PM
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luckydog

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Santa Calls has letters at the end. My kids loved the Jolly Postman also.  There's another take on the fairy tales (like jolly postman) that is written in letter format, but the name escapes me. I know I've got it in my library, if I can remember I'll check tomorrow.

Donna
#12 - March 30, 2006, 08:41 PM

luckydog

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Dear Peter Rabbit by Alma Flor Ada  -- letters between storybook characters.
#13 - March 31, 2006, 06:15 AM

nerdyglam

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Marissa Moss has a series of books about a girl named Amelia that is written in a "notebook" format. I think it was basically made to look like a journal with pictures and doodles drawn by the MC.
#14 - May 17, 2006, 01:08 AM

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