SCBWI's Blueboard - A Message & Chat Board

Could we share "Slang" with each other?

Discussion started on

Liz
Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region indiana
jerkin' him around

rides on him

#121 - November 30, 2009, 05:58 PM
You must do the things you think you cannot do.  Eleanor Roosevelt

http://www.lizstrawwrites.com/

Books for Kids and Teens
Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region oregon

Piper

Guest
do MG kids still say 'diss' or 'go off on' for insult?  Where I am, 'hate on' is still used, but my MC is a white Hawaiian and that doesn't quite work for her.
#123 - December 06, 2009, 12:04 PM

lisagailgreen

Guest
What's another way to say "off her rocker" in teen speak?
#124 - January 22, 2010, 09:22 AM

Liz
Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region indiana
whack?
#125 - January 22, 2010, 11:44 AM
You must do the things you think you cannot do.  Eleanor Roosevelt

http://www.lizstrawwrites.com/

lisagailgreen

Guest
duh!!  That's perfect.  She's whacked. 
#126 - January 22, 2010, 01:41 PM

The Get-Up Kid

Guest
Young writer, reporting in! I'm fifteen right now and getting a head start on my (hopefully) successful writing career.

I love writing about high school students about the same age as me because I know exactly how they work, what they say, and what modern high school is like.
My novel is strewn with slang. I'd be happy to answer any questions about slang heard in high schools if that's what you're writing about.
#127 - January 23, 2010, 07:44 PM

Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
Get up Kid,
Perfect timing. What would you or your peers call someone who is a 'jerk' or a 'creep'? My son would probably call him a [word censored] but I'm not going to write that.
Thanks
#128 - January 23, 2010, 09:35 PM

The Get-Up Kid

Guest
Get up Kid,
Perfect timing. What would you or your peers call someone who is a 'jerk' or a 'creep'? My son would probably call him a [word censored] but I'm not going to write that.
Thanks

Can I ask what you're writing? To be honest, [word censored] is pretty tame compared to most of the words I hear. Girls, I know, still say jerk. I've heard guys say it, too, although not as much.
I'm sorry I haven't been very helpful, but the truth is that high school vocabulary has become rather... colorful.
I'd go with jerk. Some other work-safe words I can think of are tool or tosser. If you're writing YA, I'd consider actually using [word censored] or something like that.
#129 - January 24, 2010, 09:40 AM

Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
Thank you for the new words, Get-Up-Kid. I am writing YA and may use [word censored]. I haven't even heard of 'tool' or 'tosser' before, so now I can expand my slang vocab.
#130 - January 24, 2010, 12:53 PM

The Get-Up Kid

Guest
Thank you for the new words, Get-Up-Kid. I am writing YA and may use [word censored]. I haven't even heard of 'tool' or 'tosser' before, so now I can expand my slang vocab.

If you go that far, you may want to try out some variations of the A word. It's pretty common around high school, too. [word censored], etc.
Keep in mind that tool and tosser are used minimally. I'd suggest using tosser over tool, as pretty much any YA reader can deduce what a tosser is.
Again, I'm sorry I couldn't help.
#131 - January 24, 2010, 02:04 PM

Books for Kids and Teens
Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region oregon
This might be sort of "ordinary" but what's another way teens would say the feeling expressed in "Thank God!"  (without using any religious reference.   :moose)
#132 - January 24, 2010, 03:09 PM

Member
Poster Plus
Thank you for the new words, Get-Up-Kid. I am writing YA and may use [word censored]. I haven't even heard of 'tool' or 'tosser' before, so now I can expand my slang vocab.

I don't think "tosser" is used in the US. I think it's primarily British.
#133 - January 24, 2010, 03:59 PM

The Get-Up Kid

Guest
I don't think "tosser" is used in the US. I think it's primarily British.
That would explain why I don't hear it nearly as often as douchebag or more colorful insults.
Still, I'm pretty sure it's meaning is understood universally or I wouldn't have offered it.
#134 - January 24, 2010, 04:46 PM

Member
Poster Plus
Anyone have a good slang word for "boring person"?

I've heard "drip" but that seems really dated.

Please don't use slang from the 1950's!  :crazy

How about "dork"?
#135 - January 26, 2010, 03:43 PM

PudgysHuman

Guest
I hear kids and teens still saying 'lame' for a dork.
#136 - January 29, 2010, 10:53 AM

Member
Poster Plus
I hear kids and teens still saying 'lame' for a dork.

Yeah but "lame" is an adjective. "Dork" is a noun. 
#137 - January 31, 2010, 04:04 PM

PudgysHuman

Guest
Ah...I thought we were describing someone, as a boring person can be lame. Didn't see that we were "naming" the person per se.

My bad.  :duh
#138 - February 01, 2010, 11:52 AM

Member
Poster Plus
Ah...I thought we were describing someone, as a boring person can be lame. Didn't see that we were "naming" the person per se.

My bad.  :duh

I suppose "lame dork" could work!
#139 - February 01, 2010, 03:40 PM

TiffanySchmidt

Guest
Get up Kid,
Perfect timing. What would you or your peers call someone who is a 'jerk' or a 'creep'? My son would probably call him a [word censored] but I'm not going to write that.
Thanks

My students (6th grade) would call them a "creeper." As in, "He's such a creeper, why's he keep looking at me?" Or "That contestant on American Idol was such a creeper. Did he weird you out?"

#140 - February 02, 2010, 04:22 PM

Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region midatlantic
Sorry if this has already been touched on ... I am looking for a term that means "hit on" (as in flirting with, as in "he was hitting on her") but is a little more edgy. Anyone? Thank you!!
#141 - February 19, 2010, 07:29 AM
LindaBudz
www.lindabudzinski.com

THE BOYFRIEND WHISPERER (2016)
EM & EM (2015)
THE FUNERAL SINGER (2013)

jamieharrington

Guest
It's bad how freakin' much I love kid slang.

It's like a new language, one that we have to spy on to get.

My fave saying from them right now is, "What the what?" I LOVE it :)
#142 - February 19, 2010, 10:56 PM

Erin Edwards

Guest
Hi! I'm new, and I think this is a really neat thread.

I've been trying to think of some "southern slang" or "Texas slang" lately that I've heard all my life, but people in other parts of the country may not have heard.

Here are a couple:
That's like closing the barn doors after the cows get out. (meaning - it's too late now)
cat fur (as in What fur? Cat fur. Translation from Texan - What for? Cat fur, meaning just because.)


Erin
#143 - March 29, 2010, 06:14 AM

I grew up in the south...

"...meaner 'n a hog goin' to war."
"...ain't got sense to pack sand down a rathole."
"...he wuz on it like a duck on a june bug."
#144 - March 30, 2010, 05:57 AM
http://www.bryanwfields.com
LUNCHBOX AND THE ALIENS, 2006 Holt; 2009 Square Fish
FROONGA PLANET, 2008 Holt
http://froongafiles.blogspot.com

Erin Edwards

Guest
Two of those are new to me! The "duck on a junebug" reminds me of seeing our puppy go after bugs recently. :)

And another one having to do with cats that people say to little kids they are helping undress, as they pull their shirt over their head:
Skin a cat!

And:
There's more than one way to skin a cat. (meaning - there's more than one way to do that.)

If you think about them too much, they're gross!

Erin
#145 - March 30, 2010, 09:22 AM

Erin Edwards

Guest
Ooops! You know, I think those are more idiomatic phrases than slang. Not sure. If idiomatic phrases are a group of words that mean something different than the words individually, maybe slang is more just single words used commonly with an entirely different meaning. I'm not sure.
#146 - March 31, 2010, 12:00 PM

Kurtis

Guest
Slang is just informal language. It tends to mean more recent and youth-oriented expressions. Idiomatic expressions tend to mean anything that can't be literally translated into another language. I imagine there is a huge overlap between the two.
#147 - April 03, 2010, 06:55 PM

Global Moderator
Poster Plus
  • ***
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region cencal
I LOVE those down-home expressions.  I have a blog where I post one every Saturday. The blog is basically to help kids find one helpful thing to do for the world every day--but on Saturday, I just have fun.  Here are a couple:

"Clyde, will you stop beatin' on my ears?"
"That gal's more slippery than a pocketful of pudding."  

Another one I really like that I'll post in a couple of weeks is:

"Who died and made you Elvis?"

Ellen Jackson
http://www.ellenjackson.net/blog.htm
#148 - April 03, 2010, 07:40 PM
« Last Edit: April 03, 2010, 09:08 PM by Betsy »
www.ellenjackson.net
PICKY EATERS
OCTOPUSES ONE TO TEN
THE MYSTERIOUS UNIVERSE
THE BALLAD OF BOOSTER BOGG
BEASTLY BABIES
TOOLING AROUND

I was recently asked if my book is historical because it includes the words 'runt' and 'pipsqueak'.

I had a giggle. Being that I'm 46 years old, I guess the POV is historical in nature....

Having accepted the fact that I'm historical, I'm trying to find modern slang to replace 'runt' and 'pipsqueak'.

I asked my kids. Other than my thirteen year old admitting he calls his younger brother a pipsqueak all the time, they weren't much help. Either they didn't have an answer or their choice words weren't repeatable. (Kind of sad but I'm sure the language they routinely hear at school includes words they wouldn't repeat to me. But I guess that's another story.)

So, any thoughts on the matter here?

Thanks Kindly.

Dave

#149 - April 19, 2010, 09:25 AM

Books for Kids and Teens
Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region oregon
i don't know--is "toad" any more up to date?
#150 - April 19, 2010, 11:58 AM

Members:

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.