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Could we share "Slang" with each other?

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Here in Australia we say "soft drink" or the brand name (Coke, Pepsi, Sprite, etc.). In South America (when I visited a decade ago) they said "gaseosa". I liked that.
#181 - September 11, 2010, 11:45 PM
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No, but I'm in Japan. Here, they call all soft drinks "juice."

And is juice also referred to as juice, or is there a different name for that?

Here in Australia we say "soft drink" or the brand name (Coke, Pepsi, Sprite, etc.). In South America (when I visited a decade ago) they said "gaseosa". I liked that.

I like "gaseosa" too!  I guess that describes the after-effects.  :moose
#182 - September 12, 2010, 09:55 AM

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And is juice also referred to as juice, or is there a different name for that?

I don't know of any term that refers to juice only.
#183 - September 12, 2010, 04:57 PM

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In Indiana we call it Pop.  After living in Tennessee for twenty years where all soft drinks were called Coke as in "What kind of Coke do y'all want?"  I am so glad to be back in the land of pop.

I do admit to laughing hysterically one day when I found a soft drink machine with a three sided shed built around it with a sign on it that said "We Love Pop" :lol2

One of these day I have to go on another camera safari and take some more photographs around town. 
#184 - September 14, 2010, 05:56 PM
You must do the things you think you cannot do.  Eleanor Roosevelt

http://www.lizstrawwrites.com/

I live in NC, which appears to be a rainbow-colored mix of influences from north, south, and west of us.  It was "other" for us.  A soft drink was a soft drink when I was growing up.  "Drink" for short.  The thing that sold the cans of the stuff (I remember when it went up to a quarter each!) was a "drink machine."

"I'm going to go get a drink," you'd say.  "Do you want one?"

This cracked up a church youth group visiting from Somewhere Else.  They thought "drink" should only refer to an alcoholic drink.
They said "Pop."  Every time I hear someone say "Pop" (whether they mean a soda or their dad), it makes me snicker.
#185 - September 23, 2010, 06:16 AM

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My 2-year-old calls all drinks "water." Maybe he'll start a new trend!
#186 - September 23, 2010, 06:37 PM

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Does anyone live in "other" country? I'm curious as to what other names there are for soda/pop/coke! 

Just remembered something. I think in some areas it's called "tonic."
#187 - September 24, 2010, 11:44 PM

EricJ

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Just remembered something. I think in some areas it's called "tonic."

(That's only because back in those days, it was a tonic--Which is why you used to get it at drugstores.
Not to be confused with tonic water, which actually was a tonic to prevent malaria.

...Helps to know these things, especially if you live in New England where they do call it "tonic".  :yup )
#188 - October 14, 2010, 01:50 PM

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Just remembered something. I think in some areas it's called "tonic."

Yep, Wonky--that's still a Rhode Island-ism today.   :drinking
#189 - October 14, 2010, 02:06 PM
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Yep, Wonky--that's still a Rhode Island-ism today.   :drinking

Where in RI? I have lots of friends/family from RI and I've never heard it.
#190 - October 18, 2010, 04:09 PM

ncmurphy

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Do teens still say, rad?    :smile
#191 - October 21, 2010, 05:57 PM

philipisles

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Recent terms for "unfortunate events"

bad news bears
lame sauce
#192 - November 06, 2010, 06:01 PM

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what do teens use instead of bling?

I have a teacher saying bling-bling, and the kids laugh at that description... but what term would kids use for someone in a seventh grade class that is wearing all sorts of necklaces, bracelets, rings, extreme nail polish, belts, etc.  (school has a strict dress code, i.e. uniforms and a group of girls on the first day blatantly do everything they can to break the rules knowing nothing is really going to happen other than a note home.)

So what is the new word for bling?
#193 - November 07, 2010, 07:08 PM
You must do the things you think you cannot do.  Eleanor Roosevelt

http://www.lizstrawwrites.com/

SusanT

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#194 - November 07, 2010, 07:48 PM
« Last Edit: November 07, 2010, 07:51 PM by SusanT »

Liz
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How about excessorize?


love it - it is just what they are doing!  older adults would say bling, but know way I see 7th graders doing anything but making fun of the term!

Excessorize
#195 - November 08, 2010, 11:31 AM
You must do the things you think you cannot do.  Eleanor Roosevelt

http://www.lizstrawwrites.com/

philipisles

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Here are two lists from www.TrendCentral.com (which is a great research/trendspotting website). They might be a bit too old, but interesting nonetheless:


Fauxt
v. the act of avoiding human interaction by pretending to use a mobile device.
"That elevator ride with the guy I smooched at the holiday party was so painful. I was fauxting throughout the whole 15 floor journey."

Alt
n. term used to describe a person who listens to 'alternative' music or to designate a 'hipster.' Though 'alternative' has been used as a music descriptor since the '90s, Hipster Runoff blogger Carles has reintroduced 'alt' as a humorous, and slightly derogatory, noun.
"Do you think that alt's pants could be any tighter? I think I can see his veins."

Slay
v. used to describe an action, event or experience in a positive light. A product of the melding of metal and hipster culture, 'slay' can be used interchangeably with 'rule'.
"Dude, did you see Liturgy the other night at Glasslands? They totally slayed."

OMLG (Oh My Lady Gaga)
interj. term being used by Chinese youth in place of "Oh My God" or "OMG" as an exclamation of surprise, excitement, or horror.
"OMLG, she got so fake tan over the weekend that her skin matches the carrots in my salad."

PMFM
n. acronym for the phrase "Pure Mother F*?!ing Magic;" popularized by Insane Clown Posse, who've used it to describe the simple miracles around us.
"Finding a $50 bill on the street has put me in PMFM mode."


Shamelust
v. coined by fashion/pop culture blogger White Lightning in a post she wrote for Street Carnage, this word is used to describe being totally disgusted and attracted to someone at the same time.
"Don't tell anyone, but I'm totally shamelusting for the no-neck guy in the Ed Hardy shirt who offered us body shots off his abs."

GTL
v. an acronym for the phrase "Gym, Tanning, Laundry," which is the daily primping ritual popularized by Jersey Shore cast members.
"Dude, if you wanna come off as fresh in the club, you gotta GTL every single day."

Jam It
v. a retort used to tell someone you do not like what they are telling you; similar to "shut up."
"Ughhh, we are eating breakfast here, I don't want to hear what you and your man did in bed last night - jam it, lady!"

Your Team/My Team
n. a phrase used to distinguish someone you have a crush on from someone to whom you would never be attracted. This developed out of a game, most often played at bars or parties, in which players collect "cool"-looking people for their imaginary teams, while filling up their friends' teams with people they deem unattractive or funny.
"See that blonde lady wearing a leopard print coat, feathers in her hair and a beaded necklace? She's on my team. See that LARPer wearing guyliner? He's on your team."

Unicorn Puncher
n. a term used to describe someone who, in the face of cute overload (whether it be in a blog or conversation), undermines their adorableness with something gross.
"We were all watching that Kittens Inspired By Kittens video, and then this Unicorn Puncher put on a zit-popping video. So gross!"
#196 - December 03, 2010, 10:21 AM

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You know, I'd really be hesitant to use any slang that I've never actually heard or seen used online...
#197 - December 05, 2010, 06:33 PM

Tracey N

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Do teens still say, rad?

Nope. As far as I know that one's out. :)
#198 - December 21, 2010, 12:43 PM

JustinDono

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FYI this post is going to get a little PG-13 and have a few naughty words.

Expressing delight or approval:

Cool
Slick
Awesome
Awesomesauce
Groovy pants
Gear
[word censored]'
Sweet
Nice
Noice (like saying "nice" with an overdone British accent)


Exclamations of surprise

Holy Moses
Crap on a Stick
Fffffffffffffffffffffff (yes that is just a prolonged "F" sound, with the usual letters that follow it and make it obscene removed)
Oi
Hwuh
( Deity's name in possessive form) + (body part or object belonging to Deity) Example: Zeus's soiled knickers!  Though this is usually done for laughs and is not something I can just whip out at a second's notice. I have a friend back home who can actually do something like this at the drop of a hat.  While a bit obscene, his cry of "By the tits of my ancestors!" when we nearly got in a car wreck had me laughing for a good while.

Expressions of rage, disapproval, etc

You tit
Ffffffffffffffffffff (see above)
Balls
Well, [word censored]
Bob Saget!
Lameness
Weaksauce
Herpa derp uh tiddly tum (done to express to somebody that they, or something you are discussing is stupid in the extreme.  Variations possible.  example: "That movie was pretty herpy derp." or "That guy's full of derp." )
[word censored] up a rope
Fail
You dunderhead
Tosser
Full of fail
Failure pile in a sadness bowl (comes from comedian Patton Oswalt, and can refer to anything even if it isn't in a literal bowl.  Example: "This book is a failure pile in a sadness bowl")

Random

(X) for the (X) God! (Comes from an oft cried battle roar from a game.  the original is "Blood for the blood god!" but can be changed to include anything that is relevant at the time.  Eating a good pizza? "Pizza for the pizza god!" and so on)
Welp. (Deconstruction of "Well."  Did somebody say something bad, and now there's an awkward silence? WELP. Just see something that blew your mind? WELP.)
#199 - January 26, 2011, 01:43 AM

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What nationality is this JustinDono?

Noice is how to say Nice in a very broad Australian accent an is in a sense making fun of Aussies who do like to make fun of themselves.

I think it's funny that some new slang is actually old slang recycled for a new use... which might be Tosser, below. That one's older than Minder in its original meaning and Minder was pretty much old cockney.

Another is Scene which is used for the latest alternative music, and Sweet, has made a comeback from 70s surfy Sweet of the same meaning.

I like the new use of the word Fiending meaning wanting some thing. Fiending on it real bad.
#200 - January 29, 2011, 01:36 PM

Cat

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What about "whatev?"
#201 - February 08, 2011, 09:28 PM

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I have seen whatev in a lot of recent tween books
#202 - February 09, 2011, 03:13 PM
You must do the things you think you cannot do.  Eleanor Roosevelt

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That is the ultimate "I can't be bothered answering you" comment because they can't even be bothered finishing the word!   :lol2
#203 - February 11, 2011, 05:38 PM

marybk

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Here's a bit of British slang for anyone who's interested.

http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/

Now, carry on.
#204 - March 11, 2011, 05:45 PM

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Unlike the people here in Cork city, I don't use that much slang.  However, when I lived in Bradford, England, there was one word that people used quite a lot.  "Pillock". I used it as a fond term for an oaf.  It was my way of getting out of calling someone I knew an "imbescile". Actually here's a link:
 http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pillock   
  :werd
#205 - March 12, 2011, 03:59 AM

MaryWitzl

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'Epic' is widely used here in the U.K. (and I'm guessing elsewhere) to mean 'outlandish' or 'too much'. Anybody else heard this?  Epic amounts of homework, epic number of people at party, etc. Another example would be, "Mom, no offense, but your hair is sort of epic,"  used by my 16-year-old. (I wrote it down the minute I'd heard it. That way she can't claim I made it up.)
#206 - March 12, 2011, 07:09 AM

Epic is used here, too.  To me, I always think of it as surfer-type slang (which has leaked into the general population over the years).  Along with "sweeeeet" etc.  I think Failblog helped--isn't "epic fail" something they use? 

But to me "epic" would be "to such an amount as to be remembered always" and it would be coupled with something that's inherently good or bad (like a fail or a win) and magnify that thing.  As in "that was an epic math test" or "he took an epic dive, man" or whatever.  So "your hair is epic" doesn't completely work to my old fogey brain because to me "epic" doesn't have a negative connotation on its own.  Unless she meant she'd just remember your hair always?  Is "epic" now short for "epic fail" all the time?
#207 - March 12, 2011, 07:26 AM

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I've always been partial to "furry flies" and "cry me a river'.
#208 - May 24, 2011, 11:21 AM

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I was wondering if anyone knew a MG slang term for "weirdo"? Does anyone use still use that word?
#209 - June 22, 2011, 07:01 PM
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I definitely hear epic. I don't think it always has a negative connotation. I'd agree that it just means really big and memorable, though to a tween or teen, that might be synonymous with bad. ;)

My kids don't say weirdo or dweeb or nerd... the worst I've heard when talking about other kids is rude. I hear that a lot. "She is SO rude." ;)
#210 - June 22, 2011, 09:11 PM
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