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Could we share "Slang" with each other?

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Traci Dee

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That's what I'm saying--"climbing the walls" is fine the way it is.  In my opinion, no one would roll her eyes because someone said "climbing the walls" as opposed to "freaking out" or something.  But if you need alternatives:

climbing the walls:  freaking out, going mental, coming undone

To name a few...
#31 - October 04, 2008, 09:18 AM

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Thanks--I like "going mental!"  Sounds more like something kids today would say.  :)
#32 - October 04, 2008, 09:43 AM

Myrrhine

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I think kids would certainly understand "climbing the walls," but to me it doesn't sound like something a kid (non-teenager) would say. But I have no kids of my own!

Myrrhine
(who checked out the OED and playing hookey / hooking Jack thing, but couldn't get back any farther than 1848)
#33 - October 06, 2008, 11:38 AM

I heard a young woman, maybe 20-22, say on a TV talk show that she was "fogued out" [not sure how to spell this, trying to make a verb out of "fogey] when she found out that a guy she went out with was over 40. I have never heard this before or since. I thought it sounded cool and fresh. Has anyone seen or heard this phrase?

Gatz
#34 - October 15, 2008, 10:21 PM
SurfYourOwnMind.com, children's creativity blog currently in development.

anlyledo

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What are you trying to convey with "climbing up the walls"?  Another option could be bouncing off the walls, but I don't know if that fits the nuance that you want.  Or having a meltdown, losing it, going crazy.

I've never heard fogey-ed out before... but you do hear turning nouns into verbs quite a bit.  I think it used to be common with an -ified ending, but now it s more often heard with an -ed ending.
#35 - October 16, 2008, 06:28 AM

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anlyledo, by climbing the walls, I was thinking--being driven nuts.  The "going mental" worked, but it's nice to have those options too.  :)

Gatz, I never heard fogey-ed out before either--but I love it!  (Guys over 40 dating much younger women might not be fond of it, however,  :lol2.)
#36 - October 16, 2008, 08:54 AM

Aimz

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This thread is SICK

(which is current slang for "crazy, cool, insane")

urbandictionary.com is a good resource for slang.

And "fogeyed up" is a term for badly messing something up... and since it's an inappropriate word, I won't go into the details here.

#37 - October 16, 2008, 02:05 PM
« Last Edit: October 16, 2008, 02:11 PM by Aimz »

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This thread is SICK

(which is current slang for "crazy, cool, insane")

urbandictionary.com is a good resource for slang.

And "fogeyed up" is a term for badly messing something up... and since it's an inappropriate word, I won't go into the details here.



Thanks for the link! 

And too bad about the meaning of "fogeyed up."  I liked the idea that it's a feeling a young chick gets when she's bored with her 40+ guy.   :moose
#38 - October 16, 2008, 03:00 PM

My kids (11/13) frequently say "That's so random."  (As in irrelevant/off topic) I like it.  It's one of the few times when a slang term actually says it like it is and sounds good at the same time.
#39 - October 16, 2008, 05:44 PM

merewald

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urbandictionary.com is a good resource for slang.

Thanks for the link! It's awesome.

According to the Urban Dictionary, swayze is slang for "gone, disappeared". And now, I can't stop saying it. I'm such a nerd.
#40 - October 16, 2008, 05:52 PM

LoisP

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My favourite slang word these days in 'Tosser'. It's a British word to convey that someone is a bit of an idiot, but nothing fatal, maybe just a twit.
I'm still trying to find out when it first appeared in use - I think it's quite recent. I'm trying to find the right character to 'give' the term to.
This is a good site to links about English slang. http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/links.htm#british
LP


#41 - October 16, 2008, 05:55 PM

My favourite slang word these days in 'Tosser'. It's a British word to convey that someone is a bit of an idiot, but nothing fatal, maybe just a twit.
I'm still trying to find out when it first appeared in use - I think it's quite recent. I'm trying to find the right character to 'give' the term to.
This is a good site to links about English slang. http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/links.htm#british
LP

I like that one, too -- as well as "wanker," which basically means the same thing. :D


#42 - October 17, 2008, 04:33 PM
"This is your life and you be what you want to be.
Just don't hurt nobody, 'less of course they ask you."

XTC, "Garden of Earthly Delights" (1989)

Aimz

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Some slang is going to have a limited longevity I'm guessing. (though "wanker" is timeless)

I saw yesterday that "Joe the Plumber" made it to the urban dictionary, which means: "a fictional person representing the whole of the people; mostly the lower to middle class". Now, we had to replace our sewer line a couple of months ago and let me tell you, I take issue with plumbing being a lower to middle class job after what we had to pay.
 :toilet

#43 - October 17, 2008, 06:36 PM

Ooooooh,....being a brit, I should warn that "wanker" and "tosser" are timeless, yes, but also mean...er...how can I put this delicately...er...both words imply that the person is fond of ...ahem..."playing" with himself. Cough.

"Climbing the walls?"  Well, I teach teenagers, and they ALL seem to say "sketchy" or "sketched out" when they are weirded out by something.
Of course, there is "sick", "dope", "fresh", and "prime".  (which all mean totally cool!)  It's an ongoing education for me!
#44 - October 25, 2008, 08:56 PM
HANNAH & THE SPINDLE WHORL  (Ronsdale, 2010)
HANNAH & THE SALISH SEA (Ronsdale, 2013)
http://carolanneshaw.com

jules

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Heard a bunch of college freshmen (guys) talking at a sporting event and they kept using the word "tight," as in cool. "That was so tight!" they'd say when one of the players made an amazing move. Maybe it's a male thing, because my daughters never say tight, but I've heard their high school guy friends say it, too.
#45 - October 26, 2008, 05:55 PM

Oooooh...I almost forgot.  "Haggard" is a really popular expression among teens...meaning gross, or ugly.  As in, "Man, that bike he's got is so haggard!!"
#46 - October 26, 2008, 06:00 PM
HANNAH & THE SPINDLE WHORL  (Ronsdale, 2010)
HANNAH & THE SALISH SEA (Ronsdale, 2013)
http://carolanneshaw.com

anlyledo

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I spend a lot of time around college students...  and sketchy is definitely in.  Sketchy or sketch - both work.  I haven't heard haggard - that's a fun one.  I have also heard "tight"... but you should be aware that the roots of that one are..um...sketchy. 
#47 - October 26, 2008, 06:11 PM

Ooooooh,....being a brit, I should warn that "wanker" and "tosser" are timeless, yes, but also mean...er...how can I put this delicately...er...both words imply that the person is fond of ...ahem..."playing" with himself. Cough.

Yeah, I know. ;D But they're still funny words to me.

Quote
Of course, there is "sick", "dope", "fresh", and "prime".  (which all mean totally cool!)


"Dope" and "fresh" I know... "Prime" is new to me (I've heard of prime cuts of meat, and of people being "in their prime," but not as a word interchangeable with "cool"); and I will never get used to "sick" (it already means "ill," "vomit," and "disgusting" -- how many more meanings does it need??). :D

#48 - October 27, 2008, 07:20 PM
"This is your life and you be what you want to be.
Just don't hurt nobody, 'less of course they ask you."

XTC, "Garden of Earthly Delights" (1989)

taradawn

Guest
This summer I bought my daughter some tiny shells at a New Jersey shore souvenir shop. The teenage clerk held each shell up to a magnetic board mounted above the cash register to compare it to their entire inventory, which was conveniently stuck to the board with the corresponding price.

"Oh, that's so clever," I said.

"Yeah," she replied, "this thing is so boss!"

Boss = awesome, amazing, beyond cool, the ultimate whatever
#49 - October 29, 2008, 03:38 PM
« Last Edit: October 29, 2008, 05:22 PM by taradawn »

Quote
Boss = awesome, amazing, beyond cool, the ultimate whatever

"Boss" is something I heard growing up in New York state in the late 60's. I can't believe it's being used again! (still?)
Next thing you know, kids will be saying "groovy."
#50 - October 30, 2008, 10:15 AM
WHISTLING WINGS
Sylvan Dell, July 2008

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I keep hearing the "in-crowd" using the word "sick" in place of awesome. A couple of words that were used before for the same meaning were "trick" and "phat." "Trick" works for me, but "sick" and "phat" have too much of a negative connotation in my mind. I still use "cool." It's pretty universal. (and old too.) When someone greets me with, Hello, How are you? I always answer with an old fifties word that my parents used, "swell." But then I let the person know that swell also means inflamed. :smile
#51 - November 04, 2008, 06:11 AM
Fur Balls & Feathers & Fins, Oh My! Animals Are My Kind of People
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C. Lee

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Fortunately I have a couple of teen informants in my pocket, and when "slang" comes up as "how do you say X?" I immediately turn to them. I was surprised that cool was still "in." Awesome, also, just as someone in this thread already wrote. And "sweet."

I avoid current slang for the most part. I agree with others here that it dates a piece, so unless I want to date it, I don't. I did include "dopest" in my current book, and my editor wrote, "What?" She's on the east coast. I'm on the west one, so there are definitely differences in regions.

I can't remember if I wrote this on the BB, but I did bring up other slang in another post that seemed to bring my editor and some readers to a halt: Tube steak (meaning hot dog) and  head (meaning restrooms).
#52 - November 08, 2008, 07:10 AM

CarolAnne, you crack me up!
JoJohn, my ten year old uses the expression "random" too!

I try to make up my own slang whenever possible.  And I want to bring back "Gnarly" in the worst way...
#53 - November 09, 2008, 04:25 AM

lemon shoelace

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In the UK I hear kids using the term "emo" a lot. Not sure if it's used in America? Apparently it's short for "emotional" and strictly means a person who cuts themselves but they generally use it to refer to anyone who's a goth, or is a little bit different to other kids.

It seems to be accepted now as a description for depressing or angry guitar music too - I've heard young tv presenters using it for this.
#54 - November 11, 2008, 05:35 AM

In the UK I hear kids using the term "emo" a lot. Not sure if it's used in America? Apparently it's short for "emotional" and strictly means a person who cuts themselves but they generally use it to refer to anyone who's a goth, or is a little bit different to other kids.

It seems to be accepted now as a description for depressing or angry guitar music too - I've heard young tv presenters using it for this.

Yep, the kids here in the States use "emo," too, in all those same contexts.


#55 - November 11, 2008, 05:07 PM
"This is your life and you be what you want to be.
Just don't hurt nobody, 'less of course they ask you."

XTC, "Garden of Earthly Delights" (1989)

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"Gnarly" is right up there with "Gag Me With A Spoon." "Totally!" Those were fun to play with. Sean Penn's character Spicolli was so fun to watch in Fast Times at Ridgemont High. He was the king of slang.
#56 - November 12, 2008, 07:27 AM
Fur Balls & Feathers & Fins, Oh My! Animals Are My Kind of People
 www.cynthiakremsner.com

balletluvr

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For AnnH,

Would "going postal" work for you? That was popular once. I don't know if it's still in use by kids, though.
#57 - November 15, 2008, 11:01 PM

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Kids might know it, but for my use it's maybe a bit too much of a violent connotation. One to keep in mind for other circumstances though. 
#58 - November 16, 2008, 10:54 AM

"freaking out" is equal with "going mental" (which to me sounds more British, which is hardly a bad thing as they have the BEST slang across the Pond, IMO).

"Sweet" (= "good") is something I found here on the East Coast along with "wicked" (= "good") and relatively timeless for Boston-area teens. Something being "the bomb" is gone, now replaced by "tight." "Awesome" still works (unless you go too 80's with Valley Talk) and "emo" is definitely "in." "Dope" seems to be passing by and losing its punch & "that's cool" still seems casually neutral.  <:-)
#59 - November 17, 2008, 06:51 AM

C. Lee

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Feed by M.T. Anderson is interesting to share on a thread about slang. There's hardly a page without current and future slang fused together. It takes some getting used to if you're  :old, but I'm enjoying the book now that I'm in to it. Somehow I think it will be around a long time and may even contribute to real future slang. Of course, some that I think is futuristic may be current, but my informants say, no.

 I love these: "a really null shirt," "We're not going in mal," "the girl is meg un-into it."
#60 - November 18, 2008, 04:26 PM

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