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Could we share "Slang" with each other?

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It's interesting how a word can completely replace another word without really being considered slang, such as how just about all teens/young adults use "Hey" instead of "Hi". It's been around for quite a few years now, but I wonder who started it and how it spread so quickly?
#61 - November 19, 2008, 05:45 AM
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If you somehow were able to surgically extract the word "like" from my 17-year old daughter's vocabulary, she like, would like be unable to complete a sentence, because, like, it's like every other word, like when she talks, like.
#62 - November 28, 2008, 10:17 PM
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FYI wicked means "very," not good. For example: "This test is wicked easy." That is all across New England.

What I'm hearing now new is "epic" for just about everything, as well as sick and sicko.

theodore


"freaking out" is equal with "going mental" (which to me sounds more British, which is hardly a bad thing as they have the BEST slang across the Pond, IMO).

"Sweet" (= "good") is something I found here on the East Coast along with "wicked" (= "good") and relatively timeless for Boston-area teens. Something being "the bomb" is gone, now replaced by "tight." "Awesome" still works (unless you go too 80's with Valley Talk) and "emo" is definitely "in." "Dope" seems to be passing by and losing its punch & "that's cool" still seems casually neutral.  <:-)
#63 - November 29, 2008, 04:12 AM

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Regarding, "Climbing the walls" - I taught at a middle school last year and I never heard any kids use that expression. Lots of teachers did, but no kids.  :hahaha
#64 - December 01, 2008, 03:10 PM

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Climbing the Walls:  Straight buggin', trippin', exit stage left,
#65 - December 16, 2008, 12:16 PM
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I don't know who brought it up, but emo is a kind of music different than goth. Like goth and punk mixed together. There's lots of whiny screams in it, so emo can also mean they're angsting. It's a style, also.
The best slang to me, the slang that feels the most authentic, is made up by the author, usually to develop a  character. Slang can make a work dated, but this can be used to your advantage. Think of Special K in the movie Can't Hardly Wait.
Other strategies would be combing two slang words to make a new one or using an acronym, examples, fugly or MILF (not going to explain meaning there :))
#66 - December 16, 2008, 12:33 PM
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The best slang to me, the slang that feels the most authentic, is made up by the author, usually to develop a  character. Slang can make a work dated, but this can be used to your advantage. Think of Special K in the movie Can't Hardly Wait.

That was a good movie... Clueless is another in the same vein -- some of its slang was unique to those particular characters, like "Betty" (gorgeous woman), "Barney" (unattractive guy), "Monet" (someone who appears attractive from a distance, but is less so when seen close-up), "Baldwin," (good-looking guy), "disco-dancing, Oscar Wilde-reading, Streisand-ticket-holding Friend Of Dorothy" (gay man), etc. :D


#67 - December 16, 2008, 07:08 PM
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Just don't hurt nobody, 'less of course they ask you."

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This isn't a slang question exactly, but. On TV I still hear about a sporting event being "called on account of rain," so I assume that's still used. The thing is, would kids know what it means?
#68 - January 05, 2009, 04:01 PM

climbing the walls = so freakin' insane in my house

And everything, I mean every complaint, starts with Oh My God...

Emo around here means a guy or girl who wears seriously tight skinny jeans, listens to alternative, has weird hair, and is anti-social in an un-dangerous way
#69 - January 05, 2009, 04:26 PM
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Okay here's all i can think of at the moment:

If you like something, it can be
Tight
ill
dope
bad (that car is bad!)
sick

If someone talks bad about you
..they ripped you

If someone betrayed you
...they traded on you

Someone can be trippin' or you can say don't trip.

If someone is acting out of character
...you can they are frontin' on you (don't front).

If someone is too hyper
...you can say be easy.
...chill
...take a chill pill
...You're on twelve, I need you on nine.  Or whatever numbers you choose.







#70 - January 05, 2009, 05:00 PM

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I LOVED those, inspired. Please post more when you have the time.

Okay, now, I really want to tell someone to stop frontin' on me. Can someone here act out of character? Jaina? AM? Somebody?


...You're on twelve, I need you on nine. 


This one's great, too.
#71 - January 05, 2009, 07:22 PM
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inspired007

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You know what's really funny to me...

My husband and I use a lot of these everyday b/c we're around our nieces and nephs and he's an elem. school teacher.  So sometimes we're out and he'll go "that song that girl sang was bad" and I'll be like "as in good?".  It's strange that language has gotten to the point where we use words that mean the exact opposite to get across what we're trying to say.   :yo
#72 - January 06, 2009, 05:22 AM

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I love the poetry of the slang, Inspired. It does make you *want* to use it. :)
#73 - January 06, 2009, 05:30 AM
Jennifer Mckissack:
SANCTUARY, Scholastic Press
 
Jenny Moss:
TAKING OFF, Bloomsbury
SHADOW, Scholastic Press
WINNIE'S WAR, Bloomsbury

ritajr

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Don't ever "diss" anyone's mom. (Disrespect)

I've heard a few IM terms being used verbally. Such as, "idk" for "I don't know"




#74 - January 06, 2009, 03:54 PM

Anyone ever hear or use the term "buster"?  My best friend is (nick)named Buster, and I'm curious. I've heard it in a Vin Diesel movie (yeah, I know, but I can't help myself), though never in real life. It means a pretender, a wannabe -- originally, I think, someone who tries to dress as though they are wealthy when they are not, and later, someone who pretends to be a gangster when they aren't actually in a gang.

Of course there's the old meaning of someone who likes to punch people and break things...
#75 - January 07, 2009, 05:23 AM
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inspired007

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Anyone ever hear or use the term "buster"?  My best friend is (nick)named Buster, and I'm curious. I've heard it in a Vin Diesel movie (yeah, I know, but I can't help myself), though never in real life. It means a pretender, a wannabe -- originally, I think, someone who tries to dress as though they are wealthy when they are not, and later, someone who pretends to be a gangster when they aren't actually in a gang.

Of course there's the old meaning of someone who likes to punch people and break things...

Oh yeah, I've heard this a lot and have used it a lot.  You can usually use it wherever you see fit because it just a general insult.

"can I have your orange?"
"nope."
"why not? Are you gonna eat it?"
"nope."
"You're a buster."


#76 - January 14, 2009, 06:42 AM

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It's not always slang per se, but just knowing if a certain phrase would jump off the page as dated to kids.

Still wondering about "climbing the walls."  Anyone? Is that still okay to use?

Hey Ann,

Our family uses the phrase "climbing the walls" - but then we have our own climbing wall in our "garage". LOL BTW, I have found that most people understand the phrase still... so I would think that it's still in use in Some Places.  :yup

Maude  :frog
#77 - January 14, 2009, 06:46 AM

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My favourite slang word these days in 'Tosser'. It's a British word to convey that someone is a bit of an idiot, but nothing fatal, maybe just a twit.
I'm still trying to find out when it first appeared in use - I think it's quite recent. I'm trying to find the right character to 'give' the term to.
This is a good site to links about English slang. http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/links.htm#british
LP


Hey Lois, you might want to be careful about that term esp if you have a young person use it. The original meaning of the word is for a man who spends a lot of time ummm... pleasuring himself... (this I learned from some British friends many years ago).

Maude  :frog
#78 - January 14, 2009, 06:50 AM

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Me, I can't stop saying "off the chain." You can use it just about any time for anything. It's so off the chain in its awesomeness.
#79 - January 14, 2009, 01:47 PM

inspired007

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Me, I can't stop saying "off the chain." You can use it just about any time for anything. It's so off the chain in its awesomeness.

Oh man, I completely forgot about that one!!

Once at church (I go to a pretty traditional Pentecostal church) one of the church mothers (who's probably 65-ish) told my husband, who plays the keyboard/organ, that his music was off the chain!  It made everybody pause for a second and then we all busted out laughing!! How funny!!

My mother uses this sometimes too.  I just love it!
#80 - January 16, 2009, 09:13 AM

Heidi

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Here's another funny site:
http://www.insults.net/html/expressions/index.html

My favorite is:
More confused than Adam on Mother's Day.

It has some great stuff.
#81 - January 16, 2009, 09:26 AM

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I have a few:

When teens now a days say they want to leave some place they say lets "Pump."

Teen boys call brand name shoes "Chucks."

When something is cool we call it "Bad" "Grimey" or "Wicked sick."

Some teens call parties "Fetes."

Cool is considered uncool to say.

Hanging out is sometimes called a "Lime."

When you lose at a game or sport we say you got "Owned."

Off the "Shizzle my nizzle" is the new way (inspired by Snoop Dog) of saying "Off the chain."

And lastly on my list, "Metro" is the term used to describe a guy who dresses in the fitted jerseys and wears stylish apparel.

I still use cool and I like saying off the "Shizzle my nizzle," it sounds as though its something you use when you've just finished frying something.

"Mommy, the chips are off the shizzle my nizzle."
#82 - January 28, 2009, 07:45 AM
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You've got some good ones there, Tyson!
#83 - January 29, 2009, 05:00 AM
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I have a few:


Off the "Shizzle my nizzle" is the new way (inspired by Snoop Dog) of saying "Off the chain."

And lastly on my list, "Metro" is the term used to describe a guy who dresses in the fitted jerseys and wears stylish apparel.

I still use cool and I like saying off the "Shizzle my nizzle," it sounds as though its something you use when you've just finished frying something.

"Mommy, the chips are off the shizzle my nizzle."

I just wanted to comment on the shizzle my nizzle.

Shizzle my nizzle comes from "For shizzle my nizzle" or "Fa shizzle my nizzle" which is a way that kids or people who don't curse say "For sure my N****".  Maybe Snoop has morphed it into something else, but for all intents and purposes that's what it means.  I just wanted to put that out there that you don't usually see people who aren't black saying it unless some kind of stereotypical moment is happening.  Just my two cents on the subject. :hangloose


#84 - January 29, 2009, 05:25 AM

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Thanks for pointing it out and here's just a few more I know of:

When a teen boy is going to buy, or is wearing, a matching ensemble (shoes, pants, hat etc.) he calls it a "Kit"

Sometimes, and very rarely so, when someone does something inappropriate we say "They must be on crack."  :dr (I like this one)

Carey and Melony are walking through the school yard and spot a group of girls laughing scandalously in a corner. Carey turns to Melony:

"Girl, what's wrong with them?"

"Girl I don't know, but they must be on crack!"




 
#85 - January 29, 2009, 05:58 AM
« Last Edit: February 23, 2017, 10:39 AM by Tyson McFrost »
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inspired007

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Yeah, having a non-black person (I'm mixed like Obama by the way) say the phrase is funny to hear because they seem so out of their element. But I guess I must of misinterpreted its meaning. Thanks for pointing it out and here's just a few more I know of.

When a teen boy is going to buy or is wearing a matching ensemble, shoes, pants, hat etc., he calls it a "Kit"

Sometimes and very rarely so, when someone does something inappropriate we say "They must be on crack."  :dr (I like this one)

Carey and Melony are walking through the school yard and spot a group of girls laughing scandalously in a corner. Carey turns to Melony.

"Girl, what's wrong with them?"

"Girl I don't know, but they must be on crack!"




 

Hey, it doesn't matter to me whether or not people say it--white or black (or brown or...), I just didn't want anybody writing in their books w/o knowing what it really meant.  Ya dig? (I'm bringing that one back! Watch out now!) It's easy to misinterpret these days, people are sayin' all kinds of crazy stuff on regular TV, no less. It used to be only on cable, but you can say almost anything these days.

Oh and my sister says the crack one all the time!  Also, when people are addicted to stuff, like I am with my blackberry, they call it crackberry!
#86 - January 29, 2009, 07:30 AM
« Last Edit: January 29, 2009, 07:34 AM by inspired007 »

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Ya dig? (I'm bringing that one back! Watch out now!)
You done gone and ran me over, go head miss diva. Miss FA-BU-LOUS and in control! :dr

BDW, "Fabulous" is another word young people use now a days. Not the guys though, we say we're "Ghetto Fabulous" instead.

"That's hot" is another one, coined by none other than Paris Hilton. And since the release of her reality show on MTV, I'm hearing a lot of girls saying "TTYN" (Talk to you never!). I mean a simple 'you're lame!' would suffice, you ain't gotta give me some pompous letdown you heard on TV. 
#87 - January 29, 2009, 09:01 AM
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inspired007

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You done gone and ran me over, go head miss diva. Miss FA-BU-LOUS and in control! :dr

BDW, "Fabulous" is another word young people use now a days. Not the guys though, we say we're "Ghetto Fabulous" instead.

"That's hot" is another one, coined by none other than Paris Hilton. And since the release of her reality show on MTV, I'm hearing a lot of girls saying "TTYN" (Talk to you never!). I mean a simple 'you're lame!' would suffice, you ain't gotta give me some pompous letdown you heard on TV. 

 :dr :lol :hahaha
#88 - January 30, 2009, 05:08 AM

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Since this came up in another thread:

Pwn (from the urban dictionary): Perfect ownage. Flawless victory. Schooled. Lesson taught. Owned beyond conventional words, and so excited about it, it's mistyped.

Example: I totally pwned my revision!
#89 - February 03, 2009, 06:32 PM
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What's a more "teen" way of saying a guy mc is concerned about something. I don't really want to use freaked, as he's not quite up to that level of concern.  :D 
#90 - February 04, 2009, 08:36 AM

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