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Could we share "Slang" with each other?

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jules

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Is the word "peeps" outdated? I used it in my w-i-p (a character of mixed race uses it in dialogue) and got a comment from a critiquer saying that it is. I've heard several people say it just within the last week and my kids say they hear it at school but maybe in more urban areas they are already on to new things? 
#91 - March 01, 2009, 01:38 PM

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I heard someone on the radio say it recently, don't know about kids though.
#92 - March 01, 2009, 03:06 PM

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My 13 yo says no one says it a lot any more.

I figure if *I* say it, it's outdated.  And I do.
#93 - March 01, 2009, 03:09 PM
BUSY-EYED DAY (Beach Lane Books, 2018)
GROUNDHUG DAY (Disney-Hyperion, 2017)
VAMPIRINA AT THE BEACH (Disney-Hyperion, 2017)
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Is saying the word "flick" instead of movie or film still predictable vocabulary for a 14 year old boy?  If not, what is he likely to say?
#94 - March 04, 2009, 03:34 PM

This summer I bought my daughter some tiny shells at a New Jersey shore souvenir shop. The teenage clerk held each shell up to a magnetic board mounted above the cash register to compare it to their entire inventory, which was conveniently stuck to the board with the corresponding price.

"Oh, that's so clever," I said.

"Yeah," she replied, "this thing is so boss!"

Boss = awesome, amazing, beyond cool, the ultimate whatever

I'm wondering if the resurgence of "boss" is thanks to the movie Juno.

Another one to add: "punt": something you'd do to an object out of frustration
Example: "My phone is so annoying that I want to punt it."

Courtesy of my sister and her friends. I'm pretty sure they got it from the movie Anchorman.
#95 - March 11, 2009, 12:07 PM

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A punt, apart from being a small boat, is a throw used by Australian Football players where they hold the ball in one hand and drive a fist into it with the other... perhaps a little like a volleyball serve?

I like the understatements best.  In Australia, people add the words "Just quietly" to a statement to highlight the fact that it's a statement everyone already knows.  ie.  "He's fond of a beer or two, just quietly" might be said about a heavy drinker.

They also have understatements for distances... ie.  They might say "Ah, Perth, you'll need a packed lunch for that trip" (Perth is three days drive from anywhere).


#96 - May 18, 2009, 03:38 AM

Asnodgrass

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I volunteer with HS kids... so this is what I'm hearing.

That's so "scandy." (scandalous)

Guys call each other "Brah."

They say things like, "I could care less about..."

Frothy = cool

Tasty = cool

Juicy = cool
#97 - May 20, 2009, 07:41 PM

Avalon Ink

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I always like "going crazy" or "cabin fever" for the same sentiment as "climbing the walls" both of which seem to see pretty regular usage around here, where people all want to get away from.
#98 - May 24, 2009, 05:44 PM

Question:  Does anyone know of a site that has British slang?  If anyone know of one that has past and present slang, I would be grateful.  I know one, but I would like to cross reference some of the things I have. 
#99 - June 04, 2009, 06:27 AM

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I drive my 12-year-old and his best friend to school every morning and they are constantly saying "ponage," "pone," "ownage," and "random."
#100 - June 04, 2009, 07:20 AM
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Asnodgrass

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Re: Could we share "Slang" with each other?
« Reply #76 on: March 04, 2009, 05:34 PM »   

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Is saying the word "flick" instead of movie or film still predictable vocabulary for a 14 year old boy?  If not, what is he likely to say?

I've heard HS students refer to movies as chick flicks... so flick probably works. : )
#101 - June 05, 2009, 11:52 AM

Avalon Ink

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I drive my 12-year-old and his best friend to school every morning and they are constantly saying "ponage," "pone," "ownage," and "random."

It's a safe bet that "Ponage" is the out loud pronunciation of Pwnage, that was mentioned above. One of my night clerks used that term a lot... I eventually had to ask him what he was talking about.  Kids here in Idaho use "Whoa" "Awesome" and "Right On" a lot.... It's quite possible we live in a time vortex though.
#102 - June 22, 2009, 06:48 PM

RoyB

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What is interesting is how slang terms seem to fade in and out of use. Some of the ones mentioned here were used decades ago.  Even more interesting is the slang terms used in various parts of the English speaking world.  I hear so many locally, I wouldn't know where to start. Also, being in a somewhat ethnically diverse area, many of the terms used are ethnic specific.   :redbaron
#103 - June 23, 2009, 12:19 PM

balletluvr

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Quote
the slang that feels the most authentic, is made up by the author

The one thing I really liked in the "Firefly" scifi series was how the characters used Chinese or Chinese-sounding words to express their anger, etc. And also, the verb tenses had changed in their dialog, as well as dropping some of the articles.

Very clever, I thought.
#104 - June 23, 2009, 03:39 PM

"Making out" and "hanging out" -- are these phrases dated? If so, what are better substitutes?
#105 - August 14, 2009, 01:49 PM

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Hanging out is "chillin'"
#106 - August 14, 2009, 03:43 PM

I should say that I'd like to avoid uber trendy slang, just something that's neutral and not dated.
#107 - August 14, 2009, 03:49 PM

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I write speculative fiction & part of the "fun" of that is getting to make up your own slang. Since it's YA, I have to go for words that don't come across as too childish. It is a challenge, trying to figure out what teens might be saying in a hundred years!
#108 - August 14, 2009, 03:52 PM
XVI, Puffin/Speak, available now
Truth, Puffin/Speak, January 2012
http://juliakarr.com

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FYI wicked means "very," not good. For example: "This test is wicked easy." That is all across New England.

What I'm hearing now new is "epic" for just about everything, as well as sick and sicko.

theodore



Wicked awesome!!!

Slang can be very regional, too, so it's best to be aware of that.

It's a good thing I'm not writing about teens because I don't even live in an English-speaking country right now.
#109 - August 19, 2009, 01:32 AM

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Since this came up in another thread:

Pwn (from the urban dictionary): Perfect ownage. Flawless victory. Schooled. Lesson taught. Owned beyond conventional words, and so excited about it, it's mistyped.

Example: I totally pwned my revision!

This isn't really something that's only used by teens...it's netspeak, and originates from a mis-typing of the word "own." I've seen people up to their late thirties using this on message boards.
#110 - August 19, 2009, 10:39 PM

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Teen boys call brand name shoes "Chucks."

"Chucks" is a reference to Chuck Taylor (Converse) All-Stars.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chuck_Taylor_All-Stars
#111 - August 19, 2009, 11:14 PM

balletluvr

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Hi.

Can I throw out a phrase and see if it still means what I think it means? I've used "kiss up" in one of my character's quotes. She's using it as making nice or brown nosing or however you say someone trying to get on the good side of a person in power (in this case, a teacher).

Is "kiss up" still relevant?

Also, like Laura W., I'm looking for phrases that are not dated but also not real trendy so they'll still be OK to use when my WIP is published. :-)

Thanks!
#112 - October 04, 2009, 06:18 PM

RoyB

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This is an old phrase that has been in use at least since the 60's or even earlier. It comes in and out of vogue, at least here in Canada. Lots of other phrases mean the same and make the rounds along with new ones. I would say that it is still relevant but not currently a trendy phrase, just one that easily comes to a persons mind.  :smile
#113 - October 05, 2009, 09:43 AM

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Hi.

Can I throw out a phrase and see if it still means what I think it means? I've used "kiss up" in one of my character's quotes. She's using it as making nice or brown nosing or however you say someone trying to get on the good side of a person in power (in this case, a teacher).

Is "kiss up" still relevant?

Also, like Laura W., I'm looking for phrases that are not dated but also not real trendy so they'll still be OK to use when my WIP is published. :-)

Thanks!

There's always "kiss @$$."
#114 - October 05, 2009, 04:07 PM

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My seventeen year old still says hanging out. He said "chillin" as an alternative. Making out is still making out, I guess.
#115 - October 05, 2009, 06:12 PM
"The mind is everything. What you think, you become." ~Buddha   

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rvnmaiden

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I have three teen males. (and work with kids) I will be glad to interview my throng. Although, they arent huge slang-ers. I was sitting here, trying to think of ones they used in the past 3 days and was drawing a blank.
#116 - October 29, 2009, 01:09 PM

rhombus

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In my YA Crash Test Nation I had fun creating slang...to be timeless, to make up words that MIGHT be used. I find that creative kids make up their own descriptive words to express emotion or judgment.  It depends on the work whether that works or not
#117 - November 13, 2009, 06:30 PM

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In my YA Crash Test Nation I had fun creating slang...to be timeless, to make up words that MIGHT be used. I find that creative kids make up their own descriptive words to express emotion or judgment.  It depends on the work whether that works or not

True enough. Even as an adult, I always make up my own slang. My wife and I have words that we use with each other that no one else would understand.
#118 - November 19, 2009, 11:34 PM

RoyB

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"Chilling out," "chilling (chillin')," "hanging," "hanging out (around)" are quite popular in our area. Keeping the ears open for others.  :snoopy
#119 - November 26, 2009, 02:03 PM

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I need a kid term for "henpecked." This is in story for 11-14 approximately, so I don't want to use p***y whipped.  Would just "whipped" work? Would kids know what it means?  Is there a more current term.

The situation is a 14-year-old girl thinking to herself that her girlfriend's boyfriend is "henpecked."
#120 - November 30, 2009, 04:26 PM

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