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midnight sun by stephenie meyer LEAKED

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take my opinion as what it is- an opinion and a plea to say whatever you want about the books, but treat SM the way you would want to be treated, the way that you would want your writing friends to be treated, and maybe most importantly, the way that you would want them treated HERE, on this board.  It says far more about us than it does about her

Jen, thank you so much for your thoughtful post. You're a superstar!! And yes... :yourock
#31 - September 03, 2008, 06:48 AM
ESCAPING THE TIGER, Bank Street's "Best Books of the Year"
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I just want to add my thanks to Jen for her extremely articulate, sensitive and caring post. Well done, Jen. I couldn't have said it half as well as you did.

:thankyou
#32 - September 04, 2008, 09:24 AM
Verla Kay

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Rena

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Most of her fans have probably read the article already, but if not, this is on Yahoo right now --

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080903/lf_nm_life/books_meyer_dc;_ylt=AuOXPSIbE84o6IMzVPg1eaYEtbAF
#33 - September 04, 2008, 09:27 AM

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Perhaps her many fans will be satisfied with her posting the rough draft?
#34 - September 04, 2008, 09:59 AM

Myrrhine

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Snce the rough draft is only a fraction of the book, I suspect that lots of people will be even more anxious to read the rest after seeing what she has so far. I hope someday she can enjoy writing about the characters again!
#35 - September 04, 2008, 11:39 AM

Marybeth

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Poor Stephanie!  She's just trying to write fictional stories, yet she's had to defend them so much lately.  It's just entertainment, not foreign policy!



Amen!
#36 - September 04, 2008, 12:32 PM

Harrietthespy

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This is not author "bashing" -- but I don't agree with that assessment.

She was interviewing before BD was released.  So the critique of the work is fair game in light of the negative literary reviews (not fan reviews - the mainstream reviews).  She's answered by suggesting she wrote the book for herself and was trying to hold on to an early concept she developed before New Moon and Eclipse.  In a sense, she didn't want to kill her "darling" which is to say she wrote the book centered around Edward and Bella having a baby.

As a result - and because she didn't hold to her original canon (whether she wrote the NM and E voluntarily - or with a lot of editorial input), Breaking Dawn was a 180 degree departure in terms of voice, characterization and plot development.  Millions of advance copies were sold without anyone realizing what they "bought" wasn't what was "advertised."

For me this isn't a matter of whether you like the book or not.  Or like the author or not.  For me it was an issue of a rushed draft put out too early.  And because she sold it - she should defend it. Right or wrong.  The problem is she keeps defending in using contradictory statements - hence my suggestion she drop out of the limelight and regroup. Or at least get some PR advice.

It is fiction.  But it's also a commercial property.

I was at a great literary festival a few months back.  One of the authors reminded the audience that  - once released - your characters don't belong to you any more.

That's part of the joy and the pitfall of publishing.

Had BD been a stand-alone (like the HOST) it wouldn't have garnered so much commentary.  Because it came on the heels of three existing installments - it left her "exposed."

Still - Despite her problems, I think the fact that someone else released her work in this manner is reprehensible and mean-spirited.
#37 - September 04, 2008, 01:11 PM

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Just out of curiousity, has anyone read the rough draft that has been posted on her website?

Confession time.

I just read part of it today and I wondered if I was the only one or the last one to do so. I was curious because I recall reading somewhere that SM icalled Midnight Sun a character exercise.  :D  I didn't read the whole thing. Just enough to satisfy my curiousity, but not enough to take away from the mysterious Edward I liked so much in Twilight.

Am I the only one who read from it?  :embarrassed2

#38 - September 04, 2008, 02:19 PM

For me this isn't a matter of whether you like the book or not.  Or like the author or not.  For me it was an issue of a rushed draft put out too early.  And because she sold it - she should defend it. Right or wrong.  The problem is she keeps defending in using contradictory statements - hence my suggestion she drop out of the limelight and regroup.

Perhaps I'm not in a good mood, Harriet, but this statement seems a bit outrageous. Obviously, SM liked the book or she wouldn't have written it. Obviously, her editors liked the book well enough (or the possiblity of making $ off of it) enough to publish it.

Did I love it? Nope, I didn't.

But to act like an author has to "DEFEND" her book because you didn't like it is a little absurd to me. If she liked it what is there to defend? Does every author now have to face a firing squad of relentless questions? Why and to what end? It's not going to make anyone like the book more, watching her squirm, is it?

It is a consumer's job to flip through a book and see if it's something they might like. Or wait until they read some reviews to make a decision to spend their hard-earned cash on it. They are paying for the author's vision of the book -- it's unreasonable to expect an author to read a specific consumer's mind and write to please them. That there were many problems with the book is beside the point.

.... stepping off my snark box now... :D
#39 - September 04, 2008, 02:21 PM
« Last Edit: September 04, 2008, 02:35 PM by CC »
OPEN COURT, Knopf

Harrietthespy

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Snark away! We're big girls.

In this case the publishers promoted and marketed something different than what was eventually sold.  It's like expecting Cinderalla's ball gown and getting repurposed jeans in your bag.  The fan base is huge and she hit #1 before the book was on the shelf. So there was no time to review the work in advance.  Girls (and in our town, grown women) stood in line at midnight to get their pre-paid copies.  In order to get into the early "pool" for the  book signing for Host you had to preorder BD

When the reviews came out negative SM could have just sloughed it off (like most authors).  You don't see other authors going out on a post-review media blitz to counter the negative comments the way she is. And as the negative responses increased, so did the media's need to do more interviews (MTV, 10-part interview on EW, a bizarre interview with the Wall Street Journal, etc.)  (Although somewhere else on these boards someone posted a funny YouTube video from an author who got negative reviews - done by the author).

As I read some of the other boards - the comment that seemed to touch off the BD firestorm was "The Rob Effect."  Even many fans saw it as condescending. She said if people read her work again they would love it.  Then Publishers Weekly printed an editorial claiming that the problem was teen-aged girls, unrealistic expectations and "caveat emptor" and got skewered by grown women and subscribers.

If you watch any reality show - you know people have to defend their work.  They know the minute they appear in front of the camera that is the "game."  She's done three books, so this isn't news to her.

Do I think most authors do - or should defend their work?  Nope.

But SM did, and still does, and in doing so, made things worse.  She had a choice to explain or not explain her "vision" and the inconsistencies inherent in the work.  She chose the former and in doing so, put herself in a worse position than if she had just chosen to slough it off.

IMHO.

BTW - I'm with Publisher's Weekly caveat.  We won't buy her books on the release date anymore. We're still fans - for now - but trust in the product is at a premium especially since we support Independent bookstores, pay full price, and buy multiple copies of popular books so we don't have to deal with the "sharing."

It doesn't have to be a good book.  I own a lot of books I didn't like.  But after three books it at least has to come close the the prior three. BD read and felt like it was written by someone who had not read the previous installments.  She should be able to write whatever she wants.  But she shouldn't blame the reviewers and fans for noticing.

Okay - off my soap box too!
#40 - September 04, 2008, 02:49 PM
« Last Edit: September 04, 2008, 02:53 PM by Harrietthespy »

Anyway, you see this kind of stuff on the internet all the time on a micro-scale.  A well-known voice in a popular community might say something that will cause a flurry of drama.  How the original poster responds to the response usually ends up more critical than the post itself--for better, and usually, worse.


Do I think most authors do - or should defend their work?  Nope.

But SM did, and still does, and in doing so, made things worse.  She had a choice to explain or not explain her "vision" and the inconsistencies inherent in the work.  She chose the former and in doing so, put herself in a worse position than if she had just chosen to slough it off.

These are both good points, Harriet and Courtney. And a reminder to me to shut up and let my book do the talking, if I were ever to face this. Oh, wait, I'd have to have a national bestseller first... okay, well, THAT'S going to be a long wait... okay, nevermind, moving right along...

 :whistle
#41 - September 04, 2008, 03:42 PM
OPEN COURT, Knopf

Harrietthespy

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You know what - this has been a REAL learning experience for me, too.

I'm learning that what is said off the cuff and what is meant or how it is interpreted can be two different things. 

So I'm going to be one of those "recluse" writers if any of my upcoming projects does well!  A few years ago, my agent arranged a conference call for her clients with a PR firm.  That was really helpful.

Because the truth is - if you put your heart and soul into a project, and people don't like it - it can't help but sting.  But given how viral the internet has become, perhaps no response to a negative review is the best solution.
#42 - September 04, 2008, 04:01 PM
« Last Edit: September 04, 2008, 04:04 PM by Harrietthespy »

So I'm going to be one of those "recluse" writers if any of my upcoming projects does well! 

You and me both. It worked out well for JD Salinger, right?

This will be us...  :hiding :hiding. And other people will be reacting to us like...  :bow :bow

 
#43 - September 04, 2008, 04:10 PM
OPEN COURT, Knopf

You and me both. It worked out well for JD Salinger, right?

This will be us...  :hiding :hiding. And other people will be reacting to us like...  :bow :bow

 

we all wish!

and it makes me wonder, is there such a
thing as BAD publicity? esp since all her
responses have fueled controversy / discussion / rants
MORE awareness of BD?

hmm.
#44 - September 04, 2008, 04:11 PM
Silver Phoenix (Greenwillow: 4/28/09)
Fury of the Phoenix (Greenwillow: 3/30/11)
Serpentine (Month9Books: 9/1/15)

Harrietthespy

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In light of this - Here's an article by Alison Morris from Publisher's Weekly from 2007.

The last sentence made me smile and reminded me of why I do what I do!

http://www.publishersweekly.com/blog/660000266/post/1780012978.html?nid=3340

Enjoy!

. . . .I don't begrudge Stephenie Meyer her success in the least. She, like J.K. Rowling, has been perversely fortunate enough to tap into something that readers (oh, say, a million of them) have apparently been hungering for. I do, though, have to sigh along with writers everywhere over the comparison of Meyer's initial print run with those of most authors seeing the publication of their third or fourth or even their 25th novel. With the average advance for a first-time children's book author hovering around $7,500 and the print run for their first book likely to be 5,000 copies (my source for these figures: Michael Cart), it's easy to see why most writers find it impossible to make a living writing children's and YA books, let alone make a fortune.

And so I lift my cap to the non-Rowlings and non-Meyers of the world. Here's to you and your meager advances, your moderate print runs, your ability to walk the streets unmobbed by screaming teenagers, your dedication to a low-paying (but oh so valuable) cause.

#45 - September 04, 2008, 04:13 PM

Rena

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That's great -- thanks Harriet!
#46 - September 04, 2008, 04:16 PM

harrriet--  :love it.

truth is, we wouldn't trade the angst,
waiting, teeth gnashing and nail biting for
anything. how fortunate for all of us who
are pursuing our dreams!
#47 - September 04, 2008, 04:21 PM
Silver Phoenix (Greenwillow: 4/28/09)
Fury of the Phoenix (Greenwillow: 3/30/11)
Serpentine (Month9Books: 9/1/15)

Amy Spitzley

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I read all the Twilight books. I liked them. I won't go to her site to find this one, though, because then I might want more. I'll wait to see if she ever gets it in print. (grin)
This seems like a sucky thing to have happen to a person, however/wherever/whenever.
This is a bit like a condolence thread to me--I feel bad that the thing happened, whatever it was, but I have no idea what to say about it...(sigh)

AMY
#48 - September 11, 2008, 11:54 AM

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