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Rhyming Dictionary

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Can anyone recommend a good rhyming dictionary? I've been using The Writer's Rhyming Dictionary by Langford Reed. It's not bad, but I'm curious to know if there are better ones, or more comprehensive ones. This one has 25,000 entires. I did a search on these boards and found one that Verla recommended: Random House Rhyming Dictionary. Anybody have any other suggestions?

Andrea
#1 - April 13, 2009, 10:44 AM
CHRISTMAS EVE BLIZZARD, Arbordale Publishing

I think http://rhymezone.com is pretty good.
#2 - April 13, 2009, 11:24 AM

rjshechter -- I checked it out. It's pretty good! I'll be using it.
Thanks for your help...

Andrea
#3 - April 13, 2009, 12:41 PM
CHRISTMAS EVE BLIZZARD, Arbordale Publishing

tandemom06

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Here's another on-line resource: http://www.rhymer.com/
#4 - April 14, 2009, 08:56 AM

Thanks, tandemom06 -- I've bookmarked it.

I was thinking more of books instead of online sources because I'm not always at my desktop when I write. But I think the online sources are a great addition, and both of these will come in handy.

Andrea
#5 - April 14, 2009, 10:44 AM
CHRISTMAS EVE BLIZZARD, Arbordale Publishing

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I find that the Scholastic Rhyming Dictionary works well.  I bought it at a Scholastic Book Fair at my kids' school.  I have another one that is bigger, but more confusing to use.
#6 - April 14, 2009, 03:08 PM
BIG SISTER, BABY BROTHER (Meegenius), ROCKABET (Big Smile Press)
http://kpolark.blogspot.com/  http://bookrecsthatrock.blogspot.com/
@kellypolark

A quick comparison of rhymer.com and rhymezone.com convinces me that rhymezone is better.  I typed "hands" into rhymer and I was given a list of words that included many non-rhymes, like "headstands" and other trochaic two-syllable words that do not have a stress on the syllable that needs to rhyme.  And more seriously, rhymezone omitted words without the "d," such as "fans" and "cans," which are, in fact, perfect rhymes for "hands."  I also like the format of rhymezone better.  I have, on occasion, thought of rhymes on my own that were missing from rhymezone, but that will be true of any rhyming dictionary. 

I always write at my computer, so I don't need to use an actual book.  I think it would be too cumbersome to use a book anyway, since I like to glimpse at the rhyme choices every now and then as a sort of reminder, but I dont want to leave my draft behind as I go off paging through a book where I may get distracted.
#7 - April 14, 2009, 03:30 PM

LDeg

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Another good thing about rhymezone is you can search for synonyms and get definitions.  When I absolutely can't find a usable rhyme for a word, I search for synonyms and often find other words that will work.  I write on my computer too so I use it all the time.

Lori
#8 - April 14, 2009, 07:42 PM

Adrian

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I'm going to echo what Bob said with respect to rhymezone. It's a great tool, but I would caution people from assuming that it's showing you all the possible rhymes. I use it myself, but find that it pretty consistently misses one or two good options.
#9 - April 15, 2009, 06:00 AM
« Last Edit: April 15, 2009, 06:27 AM by Adrian »

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Book-wise, I love my little Webster's Compact Rhyming Dictionary. Hasn't failed me yet.   :oncomputer
#10 - April 15, 2009, 06:07 AM
Coming soon:
Elwood Bigfoot - Wanted:  Birdie Friends (Sterling)
Teeny Tiny Toady (Sterling)
If a T Rex Crashes Your Birthday Party

This is great. I've seen the Scholastic -- it's a nice addition to what I have. I'm going to check out the Random House and the Webster's Rhyming Dictionary next time I'm at Borders.

Thanks all, for your suggestions and insights! Much appreciated...

Andrea
#11 - April 15, 2009, 11:28 AM
CHRISTMAS EVE BLIZZARD, Arbordale Publishing

smichel

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I use Rhymezone as well as The Scholastic Rhyming Dictionary. The Scholastic book often has words I hadn't thought of.

Stella
#12 - April 25, 2009, 03:18 PM

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I have The New Comprehensive American Rhyming Dictionary compiled by Sue Young, published by Quill. I find that between it and rhymezone.com, I'm pretty much set.
#13 - April 25, 2009, 03:46 PM
A DANCE LIKE STARLIGHT (Philomel)
ME WITH YOU -- (Philomel)
MINI-RACER -- (Bloomsbury)
SURFER CHICK -- (Abrams)
http://kristydempsey.livejournal.com

KimberlyH

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My favorite is Words to Rhyme With by William R. Espy.
#14 - April 27, 2009, 04:11 PM

lynnwrites

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Yes,

RHYMING DICTIONARY (15, 000 WORDS) SUE YOUNG - SCHOLASTIC

This is a great addition to the links!

Cheers,

Lynn
#15 - May 15, 2009, 12:32 PM

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I've always used http://rhyme.poetry.com/ when sitting at my computer.  When I'm away from my computer, I rely on my Merriam-Webster's Rhyming Dictionary.  It has 55,000 words, and it's very comprehensive.

Laura :)
#16 - May 22, 2009, 11:11 PM
AN EYEBALL IN MY GARDEN, Marshall Cavendish Children's Books
www.LauraWynkoop.com

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I'm on this a bit late.  I also find that Rhymezone misses words, though I do use it because it's easy.  Like KDBrazil, I like The New comprehinsive American Rhyming Dictionary by Sue Young.  On the cover it states "65,000 Entries."  The publishing date is 1991 so it's not that new;)

Bill
#17 - July 01, 2009, 07:42 PM

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I always use rhymezone but there have been one or two instances when I noticed a legitimate rhyme wasn't listed.
#18 - July 02, 2009, 08:00 PM
NED THE KNITTING PIRATE, GRIMELDA series,
CITY SHAPES, DORIS THE BOOKASAURUS, ONE SNOWY DAY, PIZZA PIG, and more...
http://www.dianamurray.com

mnoeth

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A thank you to all for the great recommendations!

:)  Melissa
#19 - November 19, 2009, 02:20 PM

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I love my Oxford Rhyming Dictionary by Oxford University Press.  The way it is arranged, you can see near rhymes, as well.
#20 - November 19, 2009, 05:55 PM
FIVE SHORT SECONDS
SAYA AT SPEED
RULES OF THE GAME
TEST CASES
TWISTER RESISTERS
CRASH COURSE
Heinemann, Fall 2013

Of course rhymezone misses rhymes.  A bigger problem is that it sometimes includes "rhymes" that don't really rhyme, so you have to be careful not to use it unless you agree that it rhymes.  You can't just blindly (deafly?) go along.  I think all these dictionaries are just a spur to your own imagination, something to get you going and thinking and writing.  They are not authoritative references, they are only spurs and prompts. 

The biggest category of rhymes they tend to miss are rhymes that happen on the secondary stress of a word that is three or more syllables long.  For example, if you want to rhyme on "bad," most of these dictionaries probably wouldn't have a word like "Olympiad" because the primary stress is on "LYM" and the rhyming dictionaries don't indicate syllables that can be promoted into a beat you can rhyme on (E.g., "I wanted, and I wanted bad,/ to be in the Olympiad").  Or see/eternity.  There are countless other examples that could be given. 
#21 - November 20, 2009, 06:35 AM

MaudeStephany

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I have a copy of the Complete Rhyming Dictionary edited by Clement Wood and published by Dell/Laurel .... and while I don't do a lot of rhyming, it does come in handy when I am occasionally trying to turn a phrase.

However, I do find that some of the things they say rhyme do not, in my dialect, come close to rhyming and vice-versa. Mouse and house rhyme where I am, and yet I am often told that they do not rhyme in the rhyming dictionaries. So for me, the dictionary is just a starting point rather than a "Bible" of rhyme, and if an editor/agent ever calls me on that, well, I'll deal with it then.

Maude  :frog
#22 - November 20, 2009, 08:16 AM

B.J. Lee

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Thank you all for your comments on the rhyming dictionaries! I personally use rhymezone exclusively but am looking for a book as well. You've all given me a lot of choices to look at. Thanks.
#23 - November 23, 2009, 08:07 AM

You really have rhyming dictionaries that say mouse/house isn't a rhyme?

This is perhaps the most overused rhyme in children's poetry.  Whenever I see a mouse at the end of a line, I know as surely as night follows day that there's a house around the bend, though someday, I suppose, I'll be surprised to encounter a louse instead.

Maybe you have a rhyming dictionary that has a separate listing for "house" as a verb?  If that's the case, it wouldn't be a perfect rhyme with mouse since it's said "howz" when it's a verb.

#24 - November 29, 2009, 05:34 AM

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Quote
someday, I suppose, I'll be surprised to encounter a louse instead.

:D LOL! Or maybe the mouse's angry spouse?

I too was surprised when I read that, Maude. I thought perhaps it was a Canadian thing (? :D) but maybe it's a verb thing -- that makes more sense than anything I could think of.  Surely "mouse" and "house" rhyme as much as "cat" and "hat".

In any case, it's good to know that you can't trust your dictionary blindly.
#25 - November 29, 2009, 07:21 PM
NED THE KNITTING PIRATE, GRIMELDA series,
CITY SHAPES, DORIS THE BOOKASAURUS, ONE SNOWY DAY, PIZZA PIG, and more...
http://www.dianamurray.com

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