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ominous quote needed

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Tracy Vonder Brink

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In my supernatural YA WIP, a book falls off a shelf and lands open to...what?  I'd like something similar to Ray Bradbury's use of "By the pricking of my thumbs, something wicked this way comes" in Something Wicked This Way Comes-- something that foreshadows that there's some bad mojo on the way.  Thanks for your help!



Tracy
#1 - August 15, 2009, 07:43 AM

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Sounds like a few hours with Bartlett’s is in order.  This is my favourite kind of research, right up there with naming characters.

I thought of Yeats:

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world.

Or something from TS Eliot might be good:

I think we are in rat’s alley
Where the dead men lost their bones

or

This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but a whimper.
#2 - August 15, 2009, 10:19 AM
WITCHLANDERS
Lena Coakley
Exquisite storytelling plus atmospheric worldbuilding equals one stunning teen debut. Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

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Maybe some Edgar Alan Poe:
an excerpt from The Raven



"Prophet!" said I, "thing of evil! — prophet still, if bird or devil! —
Whether Tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore,
Desolate yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted —
On this home by horror haunted— tell me truly, I implore —
Is there - is there balm in Gilead? — tell me — tell me, I implore!"
            Quoth the Raven, "Nevermore."


 
—Edgar Allan Poe
#3 - August 15, 2009, 10:43 AM
Fur Balls & Feathers & Fins, Oh My! Animals Are My Kind of People
 www.cynthiakremsner.com

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Oh yes, there must be lots in Poe.

LC
#4 - August 15, 2009, 11:28 AM
WITCHLANDERS
Lena Coakley
Exquisite storytelling plus atmospheric worldbuilding equals one stunning teen debut. Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

Tracy Vonder Brink

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Ooh, yes...why didn't I think of Eliot, Yeats, or Poe?  I'll have to dig out some books.


Thanks!
Tracy
#5 - August 15, 2009, 02:09 PM

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Dante's Inferno?

I'm not a huge wiki fan, but a quick list of some quotes can be found here: http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Inferno_(Dante)

the most famous of which is the entrance to heck (since I can't use the double hockey stick word): Abandon all hope, ye who enter in

You might find something in Bram Stoker's Dracula, or any of the classic horror novels.
#6 - August 15, 2009, 04:20 PM

I'd check out "Paradise Lost"
#7 - August 15, 2009, 05:41 PM
S.J. Kincaid, INSIGNIA
(July 10, 2012, Katherine Tegen Books)
http://www.sjkincaid.com

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Or take several of your favorite quotes and mix, match, and stir them up to make up your own original quote.
#8 - August 15, 2009, 06:01 PM
Verla Kay

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Tracy Vonder Brink

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Will I need to do a bibliography if I'm quoting something like an Eliot or Yeats poem?



Tracy
#9 - August 15, 2009, 09:25 PM

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Your editor will tell you what you need to do for credit, if anything. It will most likely depend on how much you quote of a poem. If credit is needed in the book, the editor will decide how to give the proper credit. If what you are quoting from is in public domain, you won't need to pay for permission to use it. If not... the publisher will know how to handle it.
#10 - August 16, 2009, 03:18 PM
Verla Kay

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I thought of The Lady of Shallot by Tennyson

Out flew the web and floated wide-
The mirror crack'd from side to side;
"The curse has come upon me," cried
The Lady of Shallot.

Or you could do the classic old map line: "Here there be monsters."

It really depends on the form the mojo is going to take.
#11 - August 16, 2009, 05:39 PM

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Oooh, I love quotes!  Here are a few to consider:

"King Henry: 'Tis true that we are in great danger;
The greater therefore should our courage be."
~Shakespeare

"Mercutio: A plague o' both your houses!"
~Shakespeare

"Fear creates danger, and courage dispels it."
~Thoreau

"Fate has terrible power.
You cannot escape it by wealth or war.
No fort will keep it out, no ships outrun it."
~Sophocles

"Think of thy Deliverance, as well as of thy Danger."
~Thomas Fuller
#12 - August 16, 2009, 09:25 PM
AN EYEBALL IN MY GARDEN, Marshall Cavendish Children's Books
www.LauraWynkoop.com

Tracy Vonder Brink

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Thanks!  So much to think about...



Tracy
#13 - August 18, 2009, 07:50 AM

addicted to YA
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...
Or you could do the classic old map line: "Here there be monsters."
...

I love that line!  :love
#14 - August 18, 2009, 08:10 AM
XVI, Puffin/Speak, available now
Truth, Puffin/Speak, January 2012
http://juliakarr.com

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Try litquotes.com.  You can search by subject/topic, title, author. It's not comprehensive, but I've found good help here before.
#15 - August 18, 2009, 09:02 AM

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