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Color Preseperation for printing, how often do publishers ask for it?

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ladylind

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I just read Shulevitz's Writing With Pictures.  Great book- must read!!  His chapter on color preseperation is intense!

How often are publishers asking illustrators to do color preseperation now adays?

LL :juggle
#1 - September 28, 2009, 05:02 PM

I draw stuff for chocolates.
Member
Poster Plus
I haven't made a color sep since the mid 90s. If your work is digital, it's a simple check box in most programs to print out color seps.

I learned how to do it the old fashioned way. So, so, so happy they are a thing of the past! LOL
#2 - September 28, 2009, 07:47 PM
patreon.com/wendymartin
Animal Totem Mandala 2016
The Story Circle 2016 (PiƱata)
Color and Conjure 2017 (Llewellyn)

The last Art Director I talked to said,"You do the illustrations. You may change the illustrations. We do everything else."

Color Separation is arky. Thank God.
#3 - September 29, 2009, 04:25 AM
What's for pudding, Mimmy?

Illustration website:

http://www.puddintanesbrain.com

www.puddersputter.blogspot.com

Rock of The Westies
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Poster Plus
The last Art Director I talked to said,"You do the illustrations. You may change the illustrations. We do everything else."

Color Separation is arky. Thank God.

And a triple WHEW! to that. When someone first gave me Uri Shulevitz's  book as a gift, I was so intimidated by the possible prospect of color separation that I decided to forego illustrating and pursue writing. But that lasted about one week afer talking with someone who soothed my color separation anxiety by telling me it was a thing of the past. I do believe there are other expectations that have replaced it though. Color saturation, depth, even having traditional work scanned and ready to submit electronically are extra considerations that weren't around in days of yore. Many of the illustrators I've spoken to take their art another step by cleaning up and adding effects in Photoshop or other Illustrator Programs. (And when I speak of depth, I'm not saying that all art from days past was flat, but now it seems it really needs to pop.)
#4 - September 29, 2009, 05:53 AM
Fur Balls & Feathers & Fins, Oh My! Animals Are My Kind of People
 www.cynthiakremsner.com

ladylind

Guest
What a relief, I didn't want to tread on a time old tradition, but it certainly sounded archaic.

Thanks for the updated world.


LL
#5 - September 29, 2009, 11:54 AM

ladylind

Guest
As a side note, I have a friend that works for Colorado Printing who, when asked about color pre-seperation, said that the book must have been written in the 60's.  I assured him that it was not and he suggested a webinar about modern processes.

I've post this webinar idea here http://www.verlakay.com/boards/index.php?board=23.0
if anyone is interested.

Thanks again.

LL
#6 - September 29, 2009, 12:07 PM

ladylind

Guest
Another question for you.  Is it still standard practice to leave a margin around the edge of the work for handling and notes about page numbers, etc.?

Thanks again.

LL
#7 - September 30, 2009, 06:53 AM

While I wait these pathetically long waits I will say that margins are a great means into which one can keep notes, reminders etc. and I always use them for such absentmindedness, distraction and possible solutions. When you send your art/ms packages into the art departments I  am sure the ADs and production departments have their own ulterior motives. :) Hee hee hee

#8 - September 30, 2009, 03:11 PM
« Last Edit: September 30, 2009, 03:45 PM by AE »
What's for pudding, Mimmy?

Illustration website:

http://www.puddintanesbrain.com

www.puddersputter.blogspot.com

Iwannabe

Guest
 :hahaha... I just finished reading this book too.  While I was reading it I thought, this MUST be out of date!  I'm glad to hear that I was right. 
#9 - January 18, 2010, 06:40 AM

DDHearn

Guest
It's a wonderful book in many ways, but color separation went out in the 80's.  I started my career doing it, and I have never missed the process.  It was such a guessing game, and nothing ever came out exactly as one hoped it would.  On top of having to separate the colors,  we also had to use only two or three colors (limited color).  That's why so many of the older books are in black with only one or two other colors.  Only the most famous artists got to use full color.  When it became cheaper to print full color in the eighties, color separation went the way of the dodo.  That's one extinction I'm not regretting.

Diane
#10 - January 20, 2010, 11:48 AM

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