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Are you quick to anger? Tell me how it feels.

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Thanks for sharing, Dawn P.

When I managed a college writing center a few years back, we worked with a freshman woman who had OCD along with some mild learning disabilities. Three or four times I had saucer-eyed writing tutors come into my office and say, "I made one little criticism, and she deleted the whole paper! It was a good paper! I just wanted her to change part of a paragraph." I warned all the tutors to give that student three or four compliments for every mild criticism, and I talked to the student about how she didn't need to start over from scratch when there was one little flaw. She did great in school, made the honor roll, dealt with her anxiety reasonably well most of the time.

That student's file said she'd been a freak-out-and-run type in her earlier years. I just thought you might like to know how one of those stories turned out. It was a rocky road, but ultimately a successful experience for her.

Melissa
#31 - June 17, 2010, 12:13 PM
Twitter: @MelissaKoosmann

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I just wanted to say all your input has really helped me revamp a scene in my WIP.  It feels a lot more authentic now (to me at least).  Thanks!
#32 - June 19, 2010, 03:10 AM
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Kate Kae

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Quick tempered, but not bad tempered. That's the destinction I make when I get a quick flare of anger and say something rash.
#33 - June 19, 2010, 10:04 AM

Kelly B.

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Anger is such a fascinating topic. I have always had a temper. When I came out of the womb screaming, it was temper tantrum I'm sure.  :fury

When I was younger I had no control over my anger and would often throw things. The correlation between "if you throw it, you will break it" is something I didn't understand until I was older. Cell phones, keyboards and Gameboys died in this violent manner. As I grew up, I started being able to rationalize when I could throw a fit. If I accidentally upended my lunch on a table in the cafeteria I would immediately go into "contain the fury" mode, simply because of the social repercussions. However, if upon coming home I realized that a pen exploded in my bag and ruined everything inside I would throw that bag around the house while emitting screeches similar to a howler monkey. Then I would grab myself a pudding cup and call it a day.

As an adult I find myself working in a school, where patience is tested daily. I find myself "blowing up" very rarely and always in private. If you asked my students they couldn't imagine me getting angry. I reserve my anger for worthy causes and adults "who should know better."  :uhuh 
#34 - July 03, 2010, 04:54 PM

is kooky.
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Kudos, Kelly. I think that's the natural progression of anger management. The anger doesn't go away completely, but the ability to suppress the urge to throw stuff does. I've never met a person who doesn't get ticked.
#35 - July 03, 2010, 05:59 PM
"The mind is everything. What you think, you become." ~Buddha   

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I seldom get truly angry, but I get irritated easily.  It's like a buzz in my head that won't let me concentrate until I deal with it.  With my kiddos, I've done numerous things, but the most effective was when I stomped and yelled until they were staring at me and I had their whole attention.  I haven't had to do that since (they usually listen much more quickly now).  Most times, once I've dealt with the source of irritation, I'm fine, like nothing happened.

The few times I've been truly angry, I'm like ice.  It's almost like everything else moves away, and I can think very clearly.  However, I have a hard time speaking when I'm that angry, and if forced, I'll actually cry instead.  The few times this has happened, most people realized how angry I was, and at least a couple of them seemed to know it wasn't a good thing and totally backed off.  I think it frightens people who know me, because it's so rare.  After, it's like I've run a race, and I'll be shaking and have to work to breathe.  (The only times I've been like this is when I or someone I love has been midjudged and berated for it publicly).
#36 - July 03, 2010, 06:28 PM
Robin
Unspun: A Collection of Tattered Fairy Tales: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07BSR6CPJ/
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I'll actually cry instead.

That happens to me, too. I seldom cry when I'm sad, but if I get so frustrated that I lose the ability to communicate...the waterworks. But I'm also an aspie, so verbal communication can be really hard for me. I do pretty well, considering. (And I have to point out that replying on the boards is a constant point of stress because I worry HARD about offending people and always feel insecure and frustrated--that I'm saying the wrong thing.)
#37 - July 03, 2010, 07:34 PM
« Last Edit: July 03, 2010, 07:45 PM by Aimee Walker »
"The mind is everything. What you think, you become." ~Buddha   

Blog - http://yarghing.com

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