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Novel with graphics, not a graphic novel

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Stephan

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I was wondering. I am a writer, but also an illustrator. I want to create a book, were there are illustrations in the text, but it's not a graphic novel nor a comic. It's like a picture book, but then for YA. Like a normal novel, but with illustrations in the text. Catch my draft? Has it been done before? Also in YA? Have publishers done it? Educate me!
#1 - October 07, 2010, 05:43 AM

Get thee to a library and check out some of the newer MG books like Big Nate, Origami Yoda, Wimpy Kid, etc. and see if that's the sort of thing you mean.  If it is, then yes--it's been done and is quite popular now for that age group--middle schoolers.  "Boy books" seem to be particularly prone, and from what I've seen boy readers do love this sort of thing.  But so do the girls.  My daughter is ten and she loves that half-comic look in a book.

Sadly, the subject matter ("slackers are cool and funny!") often leaves something to be desired for me, but that's a whole other topic.  (Note: I loved Origami Yoda, which had a lot of heart and I can't lump it with Big Nate and Wimpy Kid in that regard.)

Can't speak for YA, but maybe someone will know.
#2 - October 07, 2010, 05:51 AM

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Hmm--The Invention of Hugo Cabret?
#3 - October 07, 2010, 05:51 AM
The Leland Sisters series: Courtship and Curses, Bewitching Season, Betraying Season (Holt BYR/Macmillan)
www.marissadoyle.com
www.nineteenteen.com

Happyface by Steven Emond.


Get thee to a great bookstore with an impressive YA section!! Boys do like these books.


My son is a typical hard-to-please teen reader, and he LOVED Hugo Cabret. (As a matter of fact, we all loved it. I thought it was fascinating, actually.)
#4 - October 07, 2010, 05:59 AM
What's for pudding, Mimmy?

Illustration website:

http://www.puddintanesbrain.com

www.puddersputter.blogspot.com

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I agree with above. You should really get a copy of The Invention of Hugo Cabret.  Really cool book.
#5 - October 07, 2010, 06:23 AM
FIVE SHORT SECONDS
SAYA AT SPEED
RULES OF THE GAME
TEST CASES
TWISTER RESISTERS
CRASH COURSE
Heinemann, Fall 2013

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Here's a recent title I read: The popularity papers : research for the social improvement and general betterment of Lydia Goldblatt & Julie Graham-Chang. It's MG, and the pages resemble scrapbook pages more than anything.

I really liked Origami Yoda (that's not the full title and I'm blanking on it); I agree with Jaina that this book had "something more" than light entertainment, and the sixth-grade voices were dead-on. Of course, Hugo Cabret is a far cry from Wimpy Kid as well.

As a whole, this type of book is really captivating and your timing probably couldn't be better, Stephan.
#6 - October 07, 2010, 06:34 AM
Adventures of Jenna V. Series
Caroline Grade Mysteries
The Journey of Emilie
Anne Bradstreet: America's Puritan Poet
www.marciahoehne.com

Stephan

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Alright, I'll check these out! Thanks for posting everyone! I'll see if this is what I had in mind.
#7 - October 07, 2010, 06:40 AM

Stephan

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Origami Yoda - too weird, I have origami characters in my story as well! But not all of them...
#8 - October 07, 2010, 06:43 AM

Hugo Cabret is going to be a movie. Bet it will be great!
#9 - October 20, 2010, 01:12 PM
What's for pudding, Mimmy?

Illustration website:

http://www.puddintanesbrain.com

www.puddersputter.blogspot.com

jd hull

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I agree with above. You should really get a copy of The Invention of Hugo Cabret.  Really cool book.
I agree. I loved the shift in the novel from the many illustrations up front to fewer illustrations and letting his writing tell the story towards the second half until the end.

Not sure what others think, but I'm kind of disappointed to hear it's being made into a movie. It is such a unique novel/picture book.
#10 - January 06, 2011, 06:26 PM

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Sherman Alexie's Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian? You could argue that the art wasn't very necessary to the story, though, at least not as in Hugo.
#11 - January 06, 2011, 10:03 PM
The Farwalker Trilogy
The Humming of Numbers
Reality Leak

www.jonisensel.com

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British YA books Carbon Diaries 2015 and the sequel, Carbon Diaries 2017, have a bunch of cool graphics in them.
#12 - January 07, 2011, 05:12 AM
Film school grad. Time traveller. Billy Bragg fan. Canadian/Irish novelist of character-driven fiction from sci-fi to slice of life.

KenH

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Check out Chris Wooding's MALICE and the sequel HAVOC. About 80% (pagewise) text and 20% graphic.
#13 - January 07, 2011, 08:10 AM

RyanBruner

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Scott Westerfeld's Leviathan has classic-style artwork included. Scott contracted and paid for the work himself because he wanted it included...something the publisher wouldn't have paid for themselves, I guess.
#14 - January 07, 2011, 08:19 AM

DebbieOhi

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I recommend checking out Sherman Alexie's Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian as well. The illustrations may not have been essential to the story, but they certainly enhanced it.

Debbie
#15 - January 15, 2011, 11:54 AM

The Memory Bank by Carolyn Coman (illus by Rob Shepperson) combines text and illustrations in an unusual way.
#16 - January 15, 2011, 01:11 PM

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