SCBWI's Blueboard - A Message & Chat Board

For writers over 40...

Discussion started on

Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region houston
(Seriously Lillian, no TEA KETTLES?  what do you use to like, boil water?

I still use tea kettles .. well I did until mine died ... and I wanted a new one for Christmas but got a Flip camera instead, which I am trying to become friends with. I included tea kettles on the list because other people have commented on how old fashioned it is. I guess a lot of people use their coffee makers to boil water or something.

And I still use loose tea.


And yes we have an ice cream truck that makes the rounds here. The guy lives in the neighborhood. You can see the truck parked in the driveway at night. But TWO DOLLARS for an itty bitty cup of shaved ice .. and THREE BUCKS for an ice cream!  I don't shell out often, but sometimes my kids want to be like the others. This ice cream truck guy knows our cul de sac is easy money.
#31 - December 26, 2010, 06:33 AM
Making metaphors out of molehills for over thirty years.

Emeritus
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region newengland
A dime in your pocket for emergencies

Ha!  I used to put dimes in my penny loafers (during the preppy early 80s) instead of pennies just for that reason!

Still using tea kettles and teapots and loose tea and road maps, though.

I can just remember, at the department store in the small city near where I grew up, that the elevators still had operators (no push-buttons!) and that there was still a millnery and a ladies' gloves department--this was in the late 60s and I wasn't even in school yet.
#32 - December 26, 2010, 06:50 AM
The Leland Sisters series: Courtship and Curses, Bewitching Season, Betraying Season (Holt BYR/Macmillan)
www.marissadoyle.com
www.nineteenteen.com

Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region houston
I remember when no stores were open on Sunday. I grew up in the deep South. We had blue laws.
And they had a clerk in the produce department to weigh and bag your produce.

Ah ... and roll down windows in cars!  I haven't had that since I sold my Nissan Van in 2006. Sigh. And it was hard enough to find vehicles with that feature when I bought the van in 1996. Wish I still had them --- especially when the window in my 2004 VW STATION WAGON suddenly went off track and fell into the door while I was driving in a remote beach area. Thank goodness it wasn't raining. I've heard that is common and happens after you've had a car around five years ... but geez I never remember that happening to the windows you have to manually roll down.
#33 - December 26, 2010, 06:57 AM
Making metaphors out of molehills for over thirty years.

No stores were open on holidays.  I remember back in 1984 the surprise when Weinstocks(now Macys) was open on New Year's Day.

Typewriters

Does anyone use shorthand anymore?

Those huge adding machines

Film projectors.  I used to use the really ancient one in my classroom back in the 90s.

Those bunny ears that you'd put on TVs.
#34 - December 26, 2010, 07:24 AM
NO MORE GODDESSES:
http://www.zumayapublications.com
EARRINGS OF IXTUMEA: http://museituppublishing.com
CROSSED OUT:http://www.lachesispublishing.com

smichel

Guest
I don't like coffee, but love tea so the tea kettle in our house rarely goes cold. I also have a tea cosy. :) And we have a land phone but the reception is better and we have virtually no cell reception down here near the bay. I also have a typewriter which my students were always fascinated by.

Other things that are on the outs?

Sets of encyclopedias, dictionaries and road atlases, although I use all three. Many standard reference books are becoming obsolete as people turn more and more to technology.

The card catalog - always works, but few libraries have them anymore. I have to say, the online catalog is fast and efficient and I like being able to check out the public library's holdings from home.


Stella
#35 - December 26, 2010, 07:50 AM

lydap

Guest
I remember all this stuff. Once had a job where I had to type the mimeograph text on this greenish paper and if you made a mistake there was this gunk you could paint on the mistake, let it dry and correct it.

I once took my son and an exchange student from France to the sculpture garden at the National Gallery in D.C., when they were about 12. There's a Klaus Oldenburg sculpture of a sort of melting typewriter eraser. I asked them to guess what it was and their guesses were hilarious. They didn't even get close.

I remember licking the cream off the paper that closed the milk bottle delivered by the milkman.

I don't think kids catch lightning bugs anymore but we have an ice cream man in the neighborhood and a lot of people who make their coffee in French presses have tea kettles.

And as for station wagons, how about the parents who'd let you ride in the back with the tailgate down and your legs hanging out?

The doctor coming to the house (although this apparently is making a comeback).

Cars so big you could lie down full length on the back seat and play with your toys.

And having grown up in the segregated South...Whites and Coloreds signs on bathrooms and water fountains.

Calling fabrics "yard goods"
#36 - December 26, 2010, 08:45 AM

I draw stuff for chocolates.
Member
Poster Plus
The typewriter comment got me thinking about all the MUST things for my profession that no longer exist.

Typositor
Stat camera
4 color separation mechanical
Line rule tape
Rapidograph
Waxer and wax
rubber cement
Letroset alphabets and films
Rubylith
marker comps
Type Setter

There's more but it's been almost 2 decades since I used the stuff and being an older type bear, I can't remember what they were called!  :frog:
#37 - December 26, 2010, 09:47 AM
patreon.com/wendymartin
Animal Totem Mandala 2016
The Story Circle 2016 (PiƱata)
Color and Conjure 2017 (Llewellyn)

Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region sfnortheastbay
Sadly, THANK YOU notes.

They could come back. Anything might. The other day I saw a teen stroking a milk bottle in the store and saying how cool and retro it is. She had to get it even though as a retro item the milk cost twice as much.
#38 - December 26, 2010, 10:16 AM
THE VOICE OF THUNDER, WiDo Publishing
THERE'S A TURKEY AT THE DOOR, Hometown520

www.mirkabreen.com
http://mirkabreen.BlogSpot.com

Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region sandiego
The typewriter comment got me thinking about all the MUST things for my profession that no longer exist.

Typositor
Stat camera
4 color separation mechanical
Line rule tape
Rapidograph
Waxer and wax
rubber cement
Letroset alphabets and films
Rubylith
marker comps
Type Setter
There's more but it's been almost 2 decades since I used the stuff and being an older type bear, I can't remember what they were called!  :frog:

Oh oh... you can add a lucigraph to this list!

Heh heh heh... I'm familiar with ALL these archaic materials even though I'm not quite 40. Amazing how quickly technology changes our methods. At age 15, I interned at a print shop and had to work with all of these things. Even had a big collection of letroset type at high school for my graphic design projects. I miss the smell of rubber cement.
#39 - December 26, 2010, 10:45 AM

Emeritus
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region cencal
What?!!!  You're not 40 yet?  No young coots allowed on this thread.     :eyeballs:

Speaking of which--how come there are no young coots or young fogies?

Oh, and let me add to this list--Christmas inflation.  I remember when Christmas started (at the earliest) on Black Friday--not in July and August.  And today I've already seen four Christmas adverts with more to come, I'm sure.
#40 - December 26, 2010, 10:49 AM
« Last Edit: December 26, 2010, 10:58 AM by Betsy »
www.ellenjackson.net
PICKY EATERS
OCTOPUSES ONE TO TEN
THE MYSTERIOUS UNIVERSE
THE BALLAD OF BOOSTER BOGG
BEASTLY BABIES
TOOLING AROUND

Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region sandiego
Ha ha, Betsy! Scoot on over and MAKE room! (bump!)  I'm gettin' there soon enough! I swear my kids make me feel older than 40 sometimes,  :wheelchair: especially after my arms feel sore from playing a Wii sport game. Pac Man never made my arms sore. And you know who else makes me feel older? My young editors!!!  When did they get so young?
#41 - December 26, 2010, 10:58 AM

Administrator
Poster Plus
  • ****
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region wisconsin

 Those hard square 1MB computer disks (anyone even remember why they were called "floppy"?)

They were called floppy because the earlier, larger disks -- 5 1/4 inches, I think -- actually were "floppy."

As for the mimeograph machines, I had a teacher's aide job during college that involved making "dittos" for the teacher. The first step was to type, in this case, a math worksheet, on a form consisting of a white sheet of paper backed by one coated in purple ink. If you made a mistake typing, it wasn't enough just to white out, and erasing would mean purple blobs on the copies. You had to take the form out of the typewriter, peel the white sheet back, and scrape your wrong, ink-imprinted character off the back of it with a razor blade. Only that way did the mistake not end up on the copies. Then put the form back in the typewriter and line it up properly with the text you already have typed. Oh, I do NOT rue the loss of typewriters one bit.
#42 - December 26, 2010, 10:59 AM
Adventures of Jenna V. Series
Caroline Grade Mysteries
The Journey of Emilie
Anne Bradstreet: America's Puritan Poet
www.marciahoehne.com

Emeritus
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region newengland
The typewriter comment got me thinking about all the MUST things for my profession that no longer exist.

Typositor
Stat camera
4 color separation mechanical
Line rule tape
Rapidograph
Waxer and wax
rubber cement
Letroset alphabets and films
Rubylith
marker comps
Type Setter

There's more but it's been almost 2 decades since I used the stuff and being an older type bear, I can't remember what they were called!  :frog:


I worked on/edited my high school newspaper and remember typing copy into the enormous machine that set it into columns...and the machine that made headlines, with fonts on big LP-sized plastic wheels...and then yes, making up dummies with rubber cement and exacto blades to remove typos and glue in corrections.  And that plastic tape to put in borders and column dividers...yes, things have changed a lot there, haven't they?!

I ran across a 5 1/4" disk recently, and thought about my 5Gb memory stick, and smiled.
#43 - December 26, 2010, 11:23 AM
The Leland Sisters series: Courtship and Curses, Bewitching Season, Betraying Season (Holt BYR/Macmillan)
www.marissadoyle.com
www.nineteenteen.com

Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region epa
Hey, not so fast! :old (Can't believe I finally get to use this smiley!) If I may slow the obituaries for some of these items ...

Point and shoot cameras (it's all cell phones) - For most people, maybe, but anyone with a more than casual interest in photography will still have a point & shoot. Probably digital rather than film, though.

Pay phones - Rapidly disappearing, but still exist. They show their worth during major disasters when all the cell phones are jammed. (Could be a useful plot point if you're writing a disaster novel.)

Greeting cards, birthday cards. (so many people do e-cards now) - I received exactly one e-card this year. I get fewer greeting cards than I used to, and I doubt kids send them to one another, but I'm sure kids still get birthday cards, especially from their older relatives.

Bill paying by snail mail, writing checks - E-banking is more common, but snail bills are not obsolete. Kids probably aren't writing a lot of checks, but plenty of them may see their parents do it come bill-paying time.

wood fired oven/stove - Why would this be obsolete? My family was just telling me how my pre-teen niece loves to sit in front of theirs.

Travel agents - My day job has a contract with a travel agency, and all our travel arrangements are required to be made through them. It's an online interface, true, but with any problems or last-minute switches you call the travel agency.

Record players - Several others have commented on how young music aficionados have rediscovered the record player. A friend's 20-year-old son has been collecting vinyl records for years.

Ice cream trucks. - Still seen in our neighborhood regularly, and at the neighborhood pool where plenty of kids hang out and swim.

Tea kettles - My mother has one, and her preteen grandchildren certainly know what these are, and they see one in regular use.

roadmaps - When you need more than a tiny computer screen, or if you don't have GPS, you need one.

Paneling - Old houses have paneling. Heck, some old houses still have hitching posts out front! People don't put them in new houses, but they know what these things are, and may live in houses that have them. Ditto widow's walks, pocket doors, etc.

I remember when no stores were open on Sunday - In downtown Philadelphia, many stores and restaurants still close on Sunday. This is a major city.

I think people are too quick to write off older technology and say "nobody uses that anymore" when millions of people do still use the older ways because they're comfortable, or because they can't afford to upgrade. Also, even when people do adopt new technology, they don't necessarily use it. I have friends I can't reach by cell phone or email because they never check their messages.

I do think popcorn poppers have been replaced by microwaves ... do people still use toaster ovens and hot plates?
#44 - December 26, 2010, 11:25 AM
Jennifer R. Hubbard
www.jenniferhubbard.com

Loner in the Garret: A Writer's Companion
Until It Hurts to Stop
Try Not to Breathe
The Secret Year

Emeritus
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region cencal
Thanks, Jenn.  Your post made me feel better!  I sent Christmas cards this year--although I didn't get too many, it's true (and just as many electronic ones). 
#45 - December 26, 2010, 11:35 AM
www.ellenjackson.net
PICKY EATERS
OCTOPUSES ONE TO TEN
THE MYSTERIOUS UNIVERSE
THE BALLAD OF BOOSTER BOGG
BEASTLY BABIES
TOOLING AROUND

Member.
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region oklahoma
Staying beside a radio and waiting for the DJ to play your favorite song...calling in to request that song...the joy when your favorite song would come on the radio unexpectedly...especially when  :car

A set of encyclopedias--maybe door-to-door encyclopedia salesmen have also gone by the wayside?

Cooking something "from scratch" meant using actual separate ingredients, not a mix.

Long distance calls being prohibitively expensive, and for special occasions. My parents actually sent audio tapes back and forth to my grandparents to "talk" with them, and I can remember us all having to be there on the night when we'd be making a tape for them. Each of us kids would have to account for ourselves and our latest adventures.

And because I used to do it and had my own darkroom, developing film and photos by hand--the lovely smell of developer, stop bath, and fixer...watching a photo materialize in the developer. Magic.

Feeling like this... :wheelchair: now.... :smile
#46 - December 26, 2010, 12:06 PM

We use a popcorn popper all the time - but I have to admit to never understanding tea kettles. Probably because I mostly drink coffee ;) but still... when I do make tea I just microwave some water and stick the tea bag in. I imagine if I went the loose tea route, I'd get one of those little tea presses that Starbucks sells and still heat up the water in the microwave  - it's just so fast!

And ice cream trucks - this is a pet peeve of mine - why did the cute little jeep give way to the big creepy minivan?! I want the white jeep back!!

Also - I learned that floppy discs were "floppy" because the spinning disc *inside* the case was floppy. The big ones had a floppy casing and the little ones had a harder casing, but it was the inside they were referring to with the name. Anyone here have the tape player for their computer? It was the thing before floppy discs. We were early adopters in my house. ;) I can still remember playing some sort of computer adventure game and it would get to a place where it needed to load and say "press play on tape" LOL!

Two more things:
1) lag time on web sites. Kids are so soft these days with high speed interent
2) modems that made that connecting side that was *so* iconic back in the AOL days. ;)
3) "You've Got Mail!" (I used to LOVE that sound!)
#47 - December 26, 2010, 12:22 PM
Robin

Owl Princess
Admins and Mods Emeriti
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region canadaeast
I agree that people still send greeting cards by mail.
We still use a travel agent and she's very busy.
We pay bills by cheque.
Elderly people--people of my mother's generation--and poor people--don't even have computers. My friend, a doctor, resisted becoming computerized until she was forced to last year. I know writers who had to borrow the library's computer.
I love road maps.

I do think that warming trays have become extinct. I was ambivalent about donating it when I moved recently because I knew that I could never replace it if I changed my mind.
#48 - December 26, 2010, 12:25 PM
« Last Edit: December 26, 2010, 12:27 PM by Owl »
ANTIQUE PIANO & OTHER SOUR NOTES
http://decoowlpress.com

Barb  :owl

Website: http://barbaraetlin.com
Blog: http://owlsquill.blogspot.com

Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region houston
Aha .. now I know why there has been no tea kettle in this house ... spouse has one of those electric boiler/warmer things he uses for water. I do not drink coffee. I know he has at least three appliances he uses to make coffee in the morning, but yeah, I never paid attention to them. I've just heated water in the microwave.

I miss my whistling tea kettle.

Okay, anybody remember hot pots?  A dorm room essential. A little pot that you could heat water or ramen noodles in. It plugged in. This was in the days before microwaves.

#49 - December 26, 2010, 01:01 PM
Making metaphors out of molehills for over thirty years.

Emeritus
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region newengland
We use a hot-air popcorn popper too--it tastes better, and there's been too much talk of nasty carcinogens in the lining of microwave popcorn bags to make me happy abut using them.

I use the tea kettle to boil water for my Melitta drip coffee maker--again, because it tastes better.  And ditto for cooking "from scratch" from individual ingredients--believe me, it's not out of style!!

Remember the old removeable tabs on soda and beer cans?
#50 - December 26, 2010, 01:21 PM
The Leland Sisters series: Courtship and Curses, Bewitching Season, Betraying Season (Holt BYR/Macmillan)
www.marissadoyle.com
www.nineteenteen.com

EricJ

Guest
Remember the old removeable tabs on soda and beer cans?

Me, I have enough problems just finding six-packs--
I can't carry those 12-can cardboard boxes, and have to travel out of my way to two stores in the area just to find Diet Coke or local-brand.   :sigh
#51 - December 26, 2010, 01:54 PM

I used a popcorn maker in my classroom but left it to another teacher when I moved to another district.

I made my own dittos by hand.  Wrote out homework and practice tests on those blue Xerox forms and had to put them on this one machine(which totally was a pain and very messy) to crack out copies.  I think I still have some of them somewhere in my garage!

Cassette tapes

I still have a tea kettle somewhere...

Penny candy you could buy at a liquor store. 
#52 - December 26, 2010, 02:09 PM
NO MORE GODDESSES:
http://www.zumayapublications.com
EARRINGS OF IXTUMEA: http://museituppublishing.com
CROSSED OUT:http://www.lachesispublishing.com

Oh I cook from scratch, too. I have to most of the time, because I'm gluten free. *sigh* But I've learned lots about cooking!
Also, I facebooked a bunch of friends to confirm their addresses this year and from every one I got the response "sure, here's my address, but if this is for Christmas cards, we don't send them..." I didn't get *one* card in the mail. Which is fine - I just love sending them out. I think I've gotten one hand written card all year. Mostly people facebook me. ;) I kinda think the pendulum might swing back on this one, but I don't know.

Marissa - does the coffee really taste better when you heat the water yourself? I love french press coffee, but don't really make the time to do it that way. I drink too much of it. ;) But I will make my own lattes from time to time - when I'm broke.

I feel like my kids will grow up and be flummoxed that there was life before touch screens. My two year old already thinks everything is a touch screen and gets really annoyed when it doesn't work on is dad's blackberry. ;)

I'll admit to not using road maps anymore (thank you Garmin!) which is great, because I'm directionally challenged. BUT - my sister gave me a giant framed map of Victorian London for Christmas. It's so beautiful. :) So maps as art now? ;)

Also, my kids think all fires "turn on" and my 2 year old just asked me to "turn down" the wind b/c it was too loud. They also don't understand the concept of "live tv" that you can't pause or rewind (Tivo kids...)

I also recently had to explain the term "cuff links"
#53 - December 26, 2010, 02:33 PM
Robin

Emeritus
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region newengland
Marissa - does the coffee really taste better when you heat the water yourself? I love french press coffee, but don't really make the time to do it that way.

Well, when you're making a large carafe of coffee, it's hard to boil that much water in the microwave.  :)  I don't know if it would taste different--I meant that we prefer our Melitta drip to a coffee-maker as far as flavor goes.

"Turn down the wind"--  :laugh

And yes to maps as art--we have several framed 19th century maps in our house, and I curated a museum exhibit on maps as art for my MA.  I'll bet your London map is wonderful!
#54 - December 26, 2010, 02:51 PM
The Leland Sisters series: Courtship and Curses, Bewitching Season, Betraying Season (Holt BYR/Macmillan)
www.marissadoyle.com
www.nineteenteen.com

ecb

Guest
My 96-year-old great aunt has email. :werd

I drive a station wagon, so kids in my neighborhood see one every day. And we have ice cream trucks (though I've never seen an ice cream Jeep!).

...And I think butter churns have been uncommon since my grandmother's day. :dr (I'll email my great-aunt and ask her!)

I own a teakettle, but I've never used it. When I want to boil water, I do it in the microwave.

It's interesting, though. I've been watching reruns of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" (which ran from 1997-2003), and the *only* thing that feels dated about it (other than the terrible pants--shudder) is the lack of cell phones. It adds a fascinating element of tension to the stories (characters can't always reach each other immediately) that I'm not sure would work today.

***
What about chalkboards? Have pretty much all schools upgraded to white boards (which we used to call dry-erase boards)?
#55 - December 26, 2010, 03:17 PM

Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region wpa
I'm a little perplexed by lots of things listed; seems like they perhaps aren't used as much, but are still used enough that people are familiar with them...land lines, tea kettles, chalk boards, ice cream trucks, watches, fabric stores, radio, CDs...

some others that I don't think are used at all anymore:

punch cards, for computer programming
floppy disks (as already mentioned) for computers
computer screens with just yellow or green-colored text
#56 - December 26, 2010, 03:22 PM
http://rt19writers.blogspot.com/
AMAZING KITCHEN CHEMISTRY (Nomad 2008)
EXPLORE ROCKS AND MINERALS (Nomad 2009)
MAPPING AND NAVIGATION (Nomad 2013)

Reader, reader, reader...
Administrator
Poster Plus
  • ****
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region rmc
We sent about 90 Christmas cards out (and received about 60 in return), so those are still used ;)

We have a tea kettle (though I use the microwave more often), but we also have a tea pot (to steep the tea).

There's an ice cream truck which goes through our neighborhood all summer long.

We still get milk deliveries, as well (though we don't personally get it).

We use our Colorado Gazeteer all the time (as do all of our friends).  We also have street maps which we use regularly (of course, DH is an appraiser).

Both my kiddos have wrist watches.  And DH's GPS and altimeter (and heart rate monitor) are part of his wrist watch.

But then, we still use a tent for camping ;)

Oh, and ecb, our school has 'smart boards' in every room (which can be hooked up to the internet) -- they look like white boards, however.
#57 - December 26, 2010, 03:23 PM
Robin
Unspun: A Collection of Tattered Fairy Tales: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07BSR6CPJ/
Website: www.robinprehn3r.com

Emeritus
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region cencal
My husband would die without maps.  He loves maps and wouldn't think of using anything else. (Though he's very tech savy.)

I have a tea kettle, but it's mostly for show.  I don't use it that much.

Yep, we have ice cream trucks too.

I still have my air popper and probably would use it if we weren't popcorn free these days (due to husband's health).

I have a watch, but my husband never wore one.  

We had a cell but got rid of it because we just didn't use it enough.  I never got rid of the landline, although no one ever calls except one friend and various soliciters.

I put leftovers in plastic containers.  Is it tupperware?  I don't know--but definitely the same idea.
#58 - December 26, 2010, 03:45 PM
« Last Edit: December 26, 2010, 03:47 PM by Betsy »
www.ellenjackson.net
PICKY EATERS
OCTOPUSES ONE TO TEN
THE MYSTERIOUS UNIVERSE
THE BALLAD OF BOOSTER BOGG
BEASTLY BABIES
TOOLING AROUND

MaryWitzl

Guest
Off the top of my head: singing kettles, milk delivered to your house in wire baskets, journals, address books, dictionaries and encyclopedias in book form (we have these in our house, but our kids have friends who find them very odd), shoe-shine boxes (my father had one with a little step on it and he used it regularly), wall phones with cords, t.v. tables, t.v. 'rabbit ear' antennae, t.v. dinners, wicker picnic baskets, fish knives, five-and-dime stores, wee-wee babies, jackknives, cuff links, cold cream, cream rinse, and aprons that tie around the waist.

We got the entire set of Frasier for Christmas; my kids are intrigued by the phones with cords and occasional references to cellular phones, which are always big and clunky. They make me feel SO old!
#59 - December 26, 2010, 04:23 PM

Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region houston
I don't think anyone has mentioned transistor radios yet.

I do think somebody mentioned reel to reel tape recorders. We have a reel of my husband's college clarinet recital ... and we have no way to play it  ... but he won't give it up.

#60 - December 26, 2010, 04:56 PM
Making metaphors out of molehills for over thirty years.

Members:

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.