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Looks like I haven't posted anything on the Blueboards for eight months, although I still lurk pretty faithfully.  I've been wondering what thread would come along that would lure me out of my posting hiatus.  Guess it's this one.

I stand in open defiance of the predicted demise of nearly everything listed here, and I think many of the predictions are premature.

But I'll add a few.

Pontiacs.

Oldsmobiles.

saucers.

Dining rooms.  (I once asked my class if anyone could tell me what you do in a dining room.  Only one child could give me an answer.  "It's where you have the computer," Cody said.)

And the big one ... Intelligence.

Back to lurking.
#61 - December 26, 2010, 06:36 PM

I have punch cards all throughout my book! But, yes, in real life probably they're obsolete. ;) I remember using a card to "punch in" when I worked at Eddie Bauer in the 90's - we slipped it in the cash register and it clocked us in. I kinda wonder how they do it now - but not enough to get a job in retail.  :oi

Marissa - I get it about the coffee maker now. Little slow on the uptake, here!  :drinktoast:

Strangely - I just saw an episode of The Wire (I'm late to the party) and some kid took off and his discman went flying and the disc fell out. I know people do still buy cd's (or Target wouldn't sell them) but it did take me out of the show. Because I know an urban kid on a corner would have some kind of ipod instead...

I wrote a video game book not too long ago, and want to do some revisions on it and maybe have it ready to go again after the steampunk book, and already I have to update tons. We just got a kinect at our house, for instance. ;) I don't think video game controllers will ever be completely archaic, but I have to at least nod at the new tech.

I think it's funny how things go in cycles, too. Cloth diapers disappeared, and now a lot of my friends (not me) are using them again. Milk delivery disappeared, but we have it now here in Seattle - as more of a luxury (it's all organic milk). Midwives really died back in favor of OB/GYN's, now a lot of my friends have midwives. (Again, not me - I'm a disaster waiting to happen with a pregnancy)

This is why I don't worry about the paper book - even if ereaders are *everywhere* for a while, they'll eventually claim just their niche of the market and paper books will have theirs - I think. ;)
#62 - December 26, 2010, 07:45 PM
Robin

Clerks counting your change back to you without looking at the posted amount that's on the cash register.  But counting it back without any help from the register.  Even today when I buy something with cash, I'll count back the change to make sure it's right.  A few times it hasn't been.
#63 - December 26, 2010, 09:21 PM
NO MORE GODDESSES:
http://www.zumayapublications.com
EARRINGS OF IXTUMEA: http://museituppublishing.com
CROSSED OUT:http://www.lachesispublishing.com

Oh, Ixtumea that's right! They used to count it backwards, you know like to make it add up to the bill you gave them. Now if they count it, it's forwards up to the number posted on the register. Not sure if I worded that well... but that is a big difference in shopping. ;)
#64 - December 26, 2010, 09:57 PM
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My sister was a keypunch operator.
I took shorthand in high school.
My mother wrote notes in shorthand all the time. Now she's gone and we keep finding notes we cannot read.

I doubt businesses use dictaphones anymore. In my first post college job, my boss would dictate a letter onto a tape, and I'd put it in this machine and listen to it, and type it up. Once I got all upset when I was typing a letter about someone I thought was "sick and dying" (I worked for an insurance company .. so yeah we dealt with sick and dying from time to time) .. and it turned out the person's name was Sig Dyan. I kid you not. I couldn't make that up.
#65 - December 26, 2010, 10:03 PM
Making metaphors out of molehills for over thirty years.

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How about those pencils that librarians used to stamp the date on the card of the book you were checking out. They could write with one end and stamp the date with the other. I really wanted to have one of those pencils.

We also used to get cards in bills that said Do not Fold, Mutilate, or Spindle.

Laurel  :snowman
#66 - December 26, 2010, 11:01 PM

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In college there was no registering for classes by phone. Everyone had an assigned time when she would appear on campus in a huge hall and spend most of the day going from table to table to "pull cards" for the sections of the classes she wanted.

All men Kiwanis and Rotary clubs.

Wearing dresses, nylons, and dress shoes to high school every day.

Does anyone carry school books on their hips anymore or does everyone use a backpack?

#67 - December 26, 2010, 11:06 PM

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Hey, I got a whistling red tea-kettle for Christmas because I still drink tea and use tea leaves and boil water on the stove.

I wear a veil to Church. I guess I have an old, old soul.

Vijaya

#68 - December 27, 2010, 12:04 AM
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I never saw librarian stamp pencils, but I remember the stampers that you had to move the date around on, and the little cards that went in the pocket of the book. I'm not sure about the public library, but in the school one, you had to sign your name on the little card -- so you could always tell who checked it out last.

Oooh, yes .. registering for classes ... standing in lines ... going from building to building .. it was like Black Friday ... you had to get to the line for your most desired class first or that one might fill up. I had to do the same thing in high school. We had four buildings and there were tables and teachers set up in each one, and you had a list pre-approved by your homeroom teacher of first choice classes and two alternates ... and I remember the frustration of classes closing up and having to take something dorky.

And yes, I remember do not fold, spindle, or mutilate.

I was going through a pile of my mother's old paperwork not long ago, and the coupons had little punch thingies on the side.

#69 - December 27, 2010, 06:01 AM
Making metaphors out of molehills for over thirty years.

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Has anybody mentioned mimeograph machines?  Also, lazy susans, luncheon instead of lunch (it always sounded tastier and so much more refined), organ players in movie theaters, word processors with tiny little screens  that held only half a dozen lines (we thought they were so deeply cool when they first came out), carbon copies, correction flluid, and Brylcreem.

My kids and their friends are so amazed when I pop popcorn the old-fashioned way. And I used cloth diapers too. Some traditions are just painful to give up!
#70 - December 27, 2010, 06:22 AM

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geez, speaking of organs .. it's hard to find a church with an organ an organist any more.  Very few kids majoring in organ in college. Our church in OKC had a heckuva time finding a new organist.

#71 - December 27, 2010, 07:18 AM
Making metaphors out of molehills for over thirty years.

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I had a music major friend who played keyboard in a new wave band. On Sundays, she played the organ in my grandmother's church in San Francisco. It was fun to see her in her church robes with her spiked, streaked short hair. Ah, those were the days!

Waxed paper. Does anybody still used waxed paper?  My mother was horrified by the thought of plastic baggies -- the waste!
#72 - December 27, 2010, 07:26 AM

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I have four kids in the public school system, and all the schools I've ever been in still have chalkboards. Ditto all the universities I've been in... (of course, sometimes the public schools have had better technology than the universities--the last state flagship U my husband taught at, his technology consisted of a chalkboard and an outlet in the wall--meanwhile, our kids all had computers at school. But that might just be a special state...) Next time I'm at the brand-new-just-opened-this-fall high school, I'll try to peek in a classroom and see if they still have chalkboards.
#73 - December 27, 2010, 07:44 AM

ara

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I'm interested to hear what everyone else has to say about this, but...

LOCKERS.

My kids' middle and high schools here in San Diego completely removed them at least ten years ago. Same goes for my siblings' high schools in Orange County (and they went through those years of school starting in the late '90s). The schools maintain a set of books in each classroom, plus a set of books in the library, saying lockers are unnecessary with the books at school. I guess administrators think lockers are only good for hiding contraband or something.

Anyway, I keep reading about people going to their lockers in all the YA I read, but I have to wonder how many kids still have them.
#74 - December 27, 2010, 08:45 AM

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They're in my daughters' high school that was built 5 years ago, in the suburbs of Boston.
#75 - December 27, 2010, 08:54 AM
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My son's new middle school last year had lockers. Kids were allowed to bring cell phones to school, but they had to stay in the lockers, turned off.
#76 - December 27, 2010, 09:08 AM

I taught in Tustin, Ca and they took all the chalkboard out around the middle of the 1990s.  Instead they put in whiteboards which were a pain to line when I was teaching handwriting.  Do they even teach handwriting anymore?  I know I was the only first grade teacher who did.

#77 - December 27, 2010, 09:12 AM
NO MORE GODDESSES:
http://www.zumayapublications.com
EARRINGS OF IXTUMEA: http://museituppublishing.com
CROSSED OUT:http://www.lachesispublishing.com

ara

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My son's new middle school last year had lockers. Kids were allowed to bring cell phones to school, but they had to stay in the lockers, turned off.

Olmue~Where do you live?

Marissa~Thanks for chiming in. Sounds like it's not a trend to get rid of them back east.

I should have mentioned they still have P.E. lockers, just not regular ones, so a lot of kids are going in and out of the locker room all day to retrieve their stuff.
#78 - December 27, 2010, 09:19 AM

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Ara, the new lockers were in NW Arkansas (ie Walmart moneyland). We live in Idaho now, and they also have lockers. There's no way the state of Idaho can afford to have two sets of books for every kid.
#79 - December 27, 2010, 09:25 AM

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Spouse and I go to the antique mall all the time and laugh at how many things from our childhood are on display, like Howdy Doody and Hop-a-long Cassiday mugs. We bougt a couple of oil lamp and the college-aged sales girl asked if we knew how to use them. She said she didn't know the half of what was in there. We walked around identifying common household items for her while she took notes.  :lol2 

We recently advertised an electronic typewriter on Freecycle, complete with a box of ribbons and correct tapes. The man who wanted them works for a local leadership school and wanted to show his students the Neanderthal technology (his words) people used to use.

I took shorthand in high school and used dictation machines.

It cracks me up whenever we watch a movie like "Independence Day" and the world is saved by Morse Code. How many people actually know MC any more?

Terri
#80 - December 27, 2010, 09:45 AM

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Nobody but the boy scouts knew MC when I was a kid.

I learned shorthand too.  And the first computer I learned to "program" used those little IBM cards with the holes.

In my office days, we had an assignment correcting (other people's) errors made in triplicate on those old carbon copies using a razor blade. I came home with purple stains on my clothes, hands, and face--and they were hard to get off.  I'd forgotten about that.

THE GRUMPUS UNDER THE RUG, which just went out of print, is so out of date that it shows the kid putting marshmallows in the typewriter. 
#81 - December 27, 2010, 10:12 AM
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I took shorthand in high school and used dictation machines.

To become "computer literate", I took a semester of BASIC in high school.  :oncomputer
What good did it ultimately do me?....Zero.   

And the first computer I learned to "program" used those little IBM cards with the holes.

(At least I'm not alone in being the only one to understand the old 60's-protest value of "Do not fold, spindle or mutilate...")
#82 - December 27, 2010, 10:31 AM

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Eric--I didn't take Basic, but I learned it myself.  You're right--it never did any good in the computer world, but it gave me a real sense of how programming works, so it wasn't a total waste of time.
#83 - December 27, 2010, 10:41 AM
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8-track music
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#84 - December 27, 2010, 11:18 AM
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My kids have some chalkboards and some white boards - they go to a teeny, tiny private school, that rents space from another teeny tiny private school in a building that used to be a public school built in - I'm sure - the 70's. Hence, not totally updated. The school I went to had all the lockers removed for safety reasons, but my kids have lockers - no locks though. It's a little inconceivable to me that they aren't pranked all the time, but it just doesn't occur to them.

I miss the library stampers and cards. Although, I love my self checkout, too. :)

HAM radios, anyone? Loved those when I was a kid. I just saw one on Fringe, though, so maybe they aren't totally obsolete, just not so much the thing now that we have internet.
Also, the A/V squad at school - and the film strips?
#85 - December 27, 2010, 11:28 AM
Robin

Basic, Fortran, and Cobol!

Susan
#86 - December 27, 2010, 12:11 PM

Radio Shack stuff cat toys that had a radio inside their tummies.  Remember those?  I was looking for something similar and the clerk--who must have been 20 or so--looked at me like he didn't know what I was talking about.

Kiddles that came in scent containers.  The newer versions are nothing like the ones from the 60s.
#87 - December 27, 2010, 12:33 PM
NO MORE GODDESSES:
http://www.zumayapublications.com
EARRINGS OF IXTUMEA: http://museituppublishing.com
CROSSED OUT:http://www.lachesispublishing.com

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Susan, I almost forgot about using punch cards for programming ...
I'm so glad they still sell those wind up toys. Some things will never become obsolete ... like books and pens and paper and chocolate!
Vijaya
#88 - December 27, 2010, 12:40 PM
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The projectors for films in school. Somebody was always the designated film lacer . . . then the film was always old and dry which made it break and it had to be mended with scotch tape.

The other projectors with film strips and a taped narrative. It would go "PING" when you needed to change the image.

Braces with the gear that went around the entire head that kids wore to school . . . not just to bed.

Koolats which were renamed "Gouchos"

Wallaby Shoes

Wearing Corduroy Pants that had treads so deep that they made noises when you walked . . . always topped off with a Hawaiin shirt.

Dittos

Angel Flights

Macaroni Christmas Trees

Popcorn Ceilings . . . bleck!

Shag Carpet . . . It tried to make a come-back but what a mistake that was!

Rotary Phones

Gas Stations where "Self Service" was the option most people "didn't" use.

Bicycles with "Sissy Bars" and "Banana Seats"

Merry-Go-Rounds in play grounds and parks
#89 - December 27, 2010, 01:07 PM
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There's a park near my house with a merry-go-round.
#90 - December 27, 2010, 01:30 PM
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