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Is it called a hero/ sub/ or hoagie where you are?

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(And did you know that in RI, you can have a cabinet with your grinder...I mean, a milkshake?)

That had better be a coffee cabinet!!! ;)
#31 - January 31, 2011, 09:48 PM

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Sub in Oklahoma.
#32 - February 01, 2011, 06:11 AM

jenniferfisher

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In Atlantic City, NJ, it's the World Famous White House SUB Shop
#33 - February 01, 2011, 06:40 AM

DeirdreK

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I thought PoBoys were deep fried balls of fish?
#34 - February 01, 2011, 06:47 AM

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That had better be a coffee cabinet!!! ;)

Is there any other flavor? :yup
#35 - February 01, 2011, 06:47 AM
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Sub in WI. We also do pop and bubbler here. :)

Now, I'd love to see what you all call "sloppy joes." I've heard at least four different terms for that. But that's not Liz's question.

I have to use this guy:  :hairdude

#36 - February 01, 2011, 06:47 AM
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It's a Grinder in Connecticut. (My New York family calls them Heros. They laugh at us.) :yup
#37 - February 01, 2011, 07:28 AM

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In NJ, it's a sub or a hoagie. In fact, a local(ish) landmark is called "Hoagie Haven." Laurie

Yes, Laurie!  That's the one DH mentioned when I asked him!
#38 - February 01, 2011, 07:54 AM

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Found this, from the Harvard University Dialect Survey: http://www4.uwm.edu/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/q_64.html
There are a lot of other interesting surveys on word use/dialect there.
#39 - February 01, 2011, 08:29 AM
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Sub in Missouri, though the ones you buy in the grocery store deli section are called poorboys.
#40 - February 01, 2011, 09:12 AM

ecb

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Now, I'd love to see what you all call "sloppy joes."

We call them sloppy joes, but, um, we don't make them like you do. :/ Ours--and this is a FAMILY thing, not a regional one!--are ground beef + a can of chicken gumbo soup, and OMG are they good! In fact, I have the ingredients to make them tonight (good blizzard dining! :dr).
#41 - February 01, 2011, 09:49 AM

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Sub in Buffalo
#42 - February 01, 2011, 10:57 AM
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We call them sloppy joes, but, um, we don't make them like you do. :/ Ours--and this is a FAMILY thing, not a regional one!--are ground beef + a can of chicken gumbo soup, and OMG are they good! In fact, I have the ingredients to make them tonight (good blizzard dining! :dr).

Hey, that's how I make sloppy joes! Except I add a couple tablespoons of ketchup and mustard, too.

In CO it's subs. And "pop" not soda. Have no idea what tonic is supposed to be.
#43 - February 01, 2011, 04:41 PM
OPEN COURT, Knopf

We always called the Subway type sandwich a sub, but there was something quite different that a school used to sell in the Chicago area they called a hoagie and claimed that it had Scottish roots. They could have been full of it, but the sandwiches were something I would murder for today. We used to buy a ton and freeze then - and they were good defrosted! I can't imagine how. The hoagie came on a thick, six inch roll of some sort and was packed with spiced meats, onions and cheeses.
#44 - February 01, 2011, 04:50 PM
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Sub! I'm in Seattle. :) And we have Gyro's, said "YEER-o" here, but no heros. ;)
#45 - February 01, 2011, 04:57 PM
Robin

Sub! I'm in Seattle. :) And we have Gyro's, said "YEER-o" here, but no heros. ;)
That's a Greek pitta thing, right? An entirely different animal.
#46 - February 01, 2011, 04:59 PM
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Found this, from the Harvard University Dialect Survey: http://www4.uwm.edu/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/q_64.html
There are a lot of other interesting surveys on word use/dialect there.

I always find these kind of discussions fascinating...this sandwich thing is most certainly due to regional cultural variations, I think.

Wouldn't the ingredients for a "Grinder" be different from what's in a "Poor Boy," etc?

For example "Grinder" implies tough bread you have to "grind" with your teeth. But Subway uses soft bread.

I looked up "Poor Boy" on Wikipedia and there was a picture of French bread filled with fried shrimp. I probably wouldn't call that a sub...probably just "fried shrimp sandwich."
#47 - February 01, 2011, 05:38 PM

SeeShelle

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From CT, we usually call them grinders... except if they were from WaWa (Krausers now) -- then they are hoagies.


#48 - February 01, 2011, 06:13 PM

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We call them sloppy joes, but, um, we don't make them like you do. :/ Ours--and this is a FAMILY thing, not a regional one!--are ground beef + a can of chicken gumbo soup, and OMG are they good! In fact, I have the ingredients to make them tonight (good blizzard dining! :dr).

I have a recipe for them that uses chicken gumbo, too. But I have a different one I use more often. Hope yours were great.  :burger :burger :burger --As close as I can get. :)

I've heard them called:

Sloppy joes (the term that seems most universal)
Hot tamales
A college friend from Chicago called them "crumble burgers."
And if you're from here, they're Spanish Hamburgers. Anybody outside this town goes "What's a Spanish Hamburger?" So I'd be interested to know if anybody uses this term.
#49 - February 02, 2011, 08:29 AM
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Sloppy Joes are different by me =NJ    they are a deli sandwich with 3 meats and coleslaw and Russian dressing on rye bread

http://millburn.patch.com/articles/battle-of-the-nj-style-sloppy-joe-sandwiches


and then there's the ground beef Manwich-type on a hamburger bun.
#50 - February 03, 2011, 07:55 AM

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Another vote for plain old sandwich in southern California. Even at Subway, we just call them sandwiches.
#51 - February 03, 2011, 09:43 AM

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We have grinders in Tucson. You eat them with your Eegees.
#52 - February 12, 2011, 04:19 PM
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The sandwiches at Subway are called "subs" in Melbourne, Australia (including in the TV commercials).  :)

However, I've only heard the word "sub" in relation to Subway products. For any other sandwich of the same shape and size, I would normally call it a "roll" or "breadroll."
#53 - March 03, 2011, 03:19 AM
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Suburban Philly it's a hoagie. I'm in another country now and still say hoagie and my husband, who is Bahamian, looks at me like I'm crazy. Slightly off topic, I used to say MAC machine but no one outside of PA knew what I was referring to. It seemed to be ATM everywhere else.

Ha, ha, I'm from outside Philly and I do that, too! I still tell my daughters, "Just use your MAC card."

It is hoagie down here, but drive a couple of hours north in PA and it's sub. It's soda down here, but up there, it's pop. What a difference a couple of hours of driving makes!
#54 - March 04, 2011, 07:37 AM

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In the Houston, TX area subs or po' boys (which stands for poor boys).  Po'boys can be used as a term for any type of sub sandwich but is especially used for anything with a Louisiana flavor to it, seafood and fried or roasted meat sandwiches.
#55 - April 14, 2011, 12:17 AM

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