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Ultraviolet, by RJ Anderson

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I LOVED this book!

Alison's always been extra-sensitive, something she keeps quiet about, ever since she told her mother about seeing sounds, and her mother thought she was going crazy and freaked out. But when she wakes up in a mental institution and everyone thinks she killed a girl in her class after a fight, she is terrified that she IS crazy--and guilty. But really? Even though she saw it happen--how could Tori have disintegrated? Then a neuroscientist comes to the hospital and Alison learns she's a synthesete. Dr. Faraday says she's not crazy. And, he believes her story.

The book is science fiction (you should pick up on that by the whole I-saw-her-disintegrate thing at the beginning), but that aspect unfolds gradually. It's a warm *people* story, as opposed to hard scifi, and carries wisps of L'Engle and Dr. Who--except that it's really different from anything you've read, too. From the writer's standpoint, and thinking about the whole what-makes-a-book-make-you-FEEL thread on the boards, it did a great job of using small details to make the feelings real and not just Imposed by the Author. Yay, Rebecca!
#1 - September 17, 2011, 05:54 PM

I just wanted to agree with Olmue. Ultraviolet is a very good book - well written and unusual. RJ Anderson does good stuff.
#2 - January 28, 2012, 06:46 PM

ecb

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I just got my copy last night!!

Does anyone have a copy handy? I'd like to know what the words on the inside of the dustjacket say (not the flap copy, obviously; I can read that :dr But like where it says "Synesthesia," and the other bits), but my library copy has them covered up with stickers and things.

Thanks!
#3 - February 01, 2012, 01:51 PM

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I can help you. :)


The top of the front flap says: Syn-es-the-sia. n.
A condition in which one type of stimulation evokes the sensation of another, as when the hearing of a sound produces the visualization of a color.

Tetrachromacy. n.
A condition in which an organism can identify four primary colors instead of the usual three

Schiz-o-phre-nia. n.
a mental disorder that makes it difficult to tell the difference between real and unreal experiences

I hate it when libraries cover up important information on the covers, too. And I confess I hadn't read the definitions, so now I know more about tetrachromacy. It sounds cool. (Since sometimes, fiction is so convincing that you aren't sure of the exact line between the real and unreal...)
#4 - February 01, 2012, 02:26 PM

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Thanks, Rose!  And, oooh... they seem kind of spoilery, but in a good way, if that makes sense.

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The thing that drives me crazy is when they put stickers over the title! They also put the alarm sensor thingy over the author bio on the back flap. Grrr.
#5 - February 01, 2012, 03:49 PM

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Mine covers up the publisher's name. Which is maybe not annoying to anyone else, but I like to know where a book is coming from.
#6 - February 11, 2012, 03:57 PM

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