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Pirate novels

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Captain Ink

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Not sure whether this is the correct forum, but I'm halfway through a pirate novel and I'm looking for other books in this genre to read. Any suggestions I could check out would be welcome. Cheers in advance.
#1 - January 13, 2009, 10:18 AM

DeirdreK

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One of my favorites,

Jade by Sally Watson  (Colonial girl runs off and becomes a pirate)
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson, of course....

#2 - January 13, 2009, 11:28 AM

Captain Ink

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One of my favorites,

Jade by Sally Watson  (Colonial girl runs off and becomes a pirate)
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson, of course....



I'll take a gander at 'Jade'.  :thanks2
#3 - January 13, 2009, 11:34 AM

DeirdreK

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The hardcovers of Watson's books are all out of print and selling for ridiculous sums, but if you can't get it from your library, there's a PB reprint here for 12.95:
http://www.imagecascade.com/MM071.ASP?PAGENO=61

I love all her books!!!  My library had a whole shelfull when I was young, and I must have checked Jade (and my other fave, Lark) out 3 or 4 times a year from 5th grade on.......

They don't turn up at booksales much, though....
#4 - January 13, 2009, 12:32 PM

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PIRATES by Celia Rees

BLOODY JACK and sequels, CURSE OF THE BLUE TATTOO and UNDER THE JOLLY ROGER, MISSISSIPPI JACK and MY BONNY LIGHT HORSEMAN by L.A. Meyer
#5 - January 13, 2009, 01:17 PM
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blythe

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Not at all for children, nor is it fiction, but "A Pirate of Exquisite Mind--Explorer, Naturalist, and Buccaneer: The Life of William Dampier" by Preston is a good read and bound to provide you with some wonderful ideas for detail that crackles with verisimilitude.


#6 - January 13, 2009, 01:33 PM

Captain Ink

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PIRATES by Celia Rees

BLOODY JACK and sequels, CURSE OF THE BLUE TATTOO and UNDER THE JOLLY ROGER, MISSISSIPPI JACK and MY BONNY LIGHT HORSEMAN by L.A. Meyer

I've requested these from the library. Thank you.
#7 - January 14, 2009, 07:49 AM

Captain Ink

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Not at all for children, nor is it fiction, but "A Pirate of Exquisite Mind--Explorer, Naturalist, and Buccaneer: The Life of William Dampier" by Preston is a good read and bound to provide you with some wonderful ideas for detail that crackles with verisimilitude.

Thanks. I'll have a look.
#8 - January 14, 2009, 07:50 AM

Rena

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I read mostly non-fiction when it comes to pirates. Pirate Hunter by Richard Zacks is good. :ship
#9 - January 14, 2009, 04:16 PM

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The Dust of 100 Dogs is coming out from Flux very soon! I'm looking forward to reading it. http://www.thedustof100dogs.com/.

Karen
#10 - January 14, 2009, 11:56 PM
Out now: DEADLY DELICIOUS

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MaudeStephany

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My son read A short and Bloody History of Pirates (non-fiction) and then, if you want a different slant on the Peter Pan (I think) you might pick up Peter and the Starcatchers.

Hope this helps.

Maude  :frog
#11 - January 15, 2009, 05:51 AM

Captain Ink

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I read mostly non-fiction when it comes to pirates. Pirate Hunter by Richard Zacks is good. :ship

I agree. It's excellent.
#12 - January 15, 2009, 06:13 AM

Captain Ink

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The Dust of 100 Dogs is coming out from Flux very soon! I'm looking forward to reading it. http://www.thedustof100dogs.com/.

Karen

Ooh, that sounds good!
#13 - January 15, 2009, 06:17 AM

Captain Ink

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My son read A short and Bloody History of Pirates (non-fiction) and then, if you want a different slant on the Peter Pan (I think) you might pick up Peter and the Starcatchers.

Hope this helps.

Maude  :frog

Thanks. Another trip to the library, methinks.
#14 - January 15, 2009, 06:18 AM

ecb

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THE PIRATE, Sir Walter Scott

PIRATICA and PIRATICA II by Tanith Lee
#15 - January 16, 2009, 02:00 PM

Running2StandStill

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A very fun one is the Ology book on Pirates: Pirateology
#16 - January 18, 2009, 05:29 PM

Rhonda

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I think there's one called VAMPIRATES--it has vampire pirates in it or something...I got it for my son (he hasn't gotten to it yet)...
#17 - January 19, 2009, 07:17 AM

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I agree that The Pirate Hunter by Richard Zacks is very good. As for kids books, try How to Be a Pirate by Cressida Cowell and The Giant Rat of Sumatra or Pirates Galore (it's one book, not two) by Sid Fleischman. I just love Sid Fleischman!
#18 - January 21, 2009, 06:48 PM
Katie L. Carroll

Pirate Island - MG adventure
Elixir Bound, Elixir Saved - YA Fantasy
www.katielcarroll.com

richmond8

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Airborn, by Oppel, is MG/YA novel that takes place earlier in the century in a time when airplanes haven't been invented and everyone travels by dirigible.  The pirates too.  Very exciting novel--has a sequel.
#19 - January 22, 2009, 12:05 PM

Captain Ink

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Thanks everyone. Good suggestions, all.
#20 - January 22, 2009, 12:34 PM

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For lots of laughs, try The Pirates! In an Adventure with Whaling by Gideon Defoe. It's a tiny book (which, for some reason, I found made it all the more appealing... as though it would fit nicely in a small cabin) and it's very funny. Defoe has a series of these books, and I'm sure the others are just as good. In fact, I must get some myself!
#21 - January 03, 2012, 07:43 AM

Woods

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The BLOODY JACK series also has a lot of pirates in it.
#22 - January 04, 2012, 07:22 AM

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LILLY AND THE PIRATES by Phyllis Root is a fun middle grade book.
#23 - January 04, 2012, 08:53 AM
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Just wanted to point out that this thread is now two years old...checking the date is a good idea.
#24 - January 04, 2012, 08:59 AM
The Leland Sisters series: Courtship and Curses, Bewitching Season, Betraying Season (Holt BYR/Macmillan)
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www.nineteenteen.com

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Huh, that's really odd. It looks like I was the one who picked it up but I never got the 'this is an old thread are you sure you want to post?' message and what's even odder was that it was listed in the 'show unread posts' section! Must've been a blip somehow.

Sorry for dragging it up, me mateys!! Although I do have some pirate books on order now ;)
#25 - January 04, 2012, 12:30 PM

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Franzilla, there was a post before yours which bumped the thread up, but it seems to have disappeared now - someone called Cherie spruiking her book as the best in the pirate genre. I ignored it because it seemed spammy (it was her first post on the board) and because the thread was so old.

But Captain Ink is still here, so maybe the thread will just pick up where it left off? Are you still looking for recs, Cap'n? How is your own pirate book going?
#26 - January 04, 2012, 03:59 PM

Jeff Faville

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What is it about pirates that capture the popular imagination? I wrote an early MG pirate adventure, but shelved it because it largely because I couldn't get past the moral implications of characters bent on stealing and plunder. Maybe the only good pirate is a reluctant pirate.
#27 - January 07, 2012, 08:38 PM

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What is it about pirates that capture the popular imagination? I wrote an early MG pirate adventure, but shelved it because it largely because I couldn't get past the moral implications of characters bent on stealing and plunder. Maybe the only good pirate is a reluctant pirate.

People hardly ever consider the real implications of what being a pirate means (especially today, when pirates are still very much in existence and do unspeakable things to sailors not just stealing), but I also think that the English are largely to blame for making Sir Francis Drake such a hero, when in fact he was simply a pirate hired by a queen. He made stealing on the high seas seem glamorous, exciting and cool (although I'm sure they didn't use that word then!). So, partly because of that, pirating is seen as adventure on the water rather than actually stealing, murdering and generally being a menace to society.
#28 - January 08, 2012, 11:40 AM

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