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science librarian?

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I have been trying to find a children's science librarian--an honest-to-goodness specialist or someone who just knows and loves science-related books for kids. I'd prefer someone who is interested in "science" broadly, but if I had to narrow my focus I'd say life sciences, especially things related to plants, insects, and oceans. Does anyone know of such a person? Or, do you have suggestions of other places I could try looking? I've already tried several places--will provide a list if you'd like.
#1 - March 08, 2012, 11:05 AM
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I wonder whether the National Science Teachers website will give you any leads. Here is a link to their Publications page. Best of luck.
http://www.nsta.org/pdfs/brochure/Publications.pdf
#2 - March 08, 2012, 03:24 PM
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You might try googling "Ask a scientist". Just a thought.
#3 - March 08, 2012, 04:02 PM

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Thanks, JulieM and CaroleB. NSTA is one of the places I'm waiting to hear back from--maybe that will work!
#4 - March 08, 2012, 07:58 PM
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Children's librarians don't have specialties, so you won't find a children's "science" librarian. You may find a librarian who is a science enthusiast. I would suggest going into a large library in your area and asking the librarian at the desk "who does the ordering for the science section". They may tell you that they all share in the ordering task, and in that case you can give that librarian your question and see if there's someone else in the building he or she can recommend who may be able to help you. Good luck.
#5 - March 09, 2012, 06:22 AM
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You might try places like The Children's Museum in Indianapolis. I know Fort Wayne, IN has a place called Science Central. Maybe you could pick someone's brain in places like that.

Sylvan Dell publishes "fun, fact-filled, fiction" and I think a lot them are science related.
#6 - March 09, 2012, 06:33 AM

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Thanks for the clarification, Michelle J, and for the suggestion, CaroleB. I hadn't thought of trying science museums, but that opens up lots of great possibilities.
#7 - March 11, 2012, 08:16 AM
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Lisa, can you say specifically what info you're looking for? (I buy all the YA science books for my public library, and the children's librarian buys all the kids' books.)

I agree that talking to someone at a children's science museum is a great idea!
#8 - March 11, 2012, 08:26 AM
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It's a reasonable question, but I'm not sure I can say exactly what I'm looking for. I have a background in science (plant ecology) and writing (some non-fiction for adults), but I am fairly new to science writing for children. I'd just like to occasionally talk to someone who is knowledgeable and enthusiastic about this genre (esp. re: PBs through MG) and can help me expand my breadth and depth a little faster than I seem to be doing it on my own. I’d love to be able to say, “I’m looking for a book that uses X technique or covers Y subject in this particular way” and have them be able to come up with something. This person wouldn’t necessarily need to be a librarian, but that seemed like an obvious place to start. Maybe I’m just dreaming, but I thought it was worth asking.

I also have questions about who is reading some of the books I’ve seen, and how they’re using them, so that I can better understand who my potential audience is. For that it really would be helpful to be in contact with a librarian.
#9 - March 12, 2012, 06:13 PM
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Lisa, I would definitely hit up your local children's librarian at your public library then. We love these questions! We can't always find the exact answers, but it is fun to poke around and see what's on the shelves.
#10 - March 12, 2012, 06:41 PM
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We have a wonderful children's librarian, and I have asked her these questions, but she herself admits that she is not an expert in things science-y. She has passed along a few things, and that was helpful, but I guess I'm hoping to find someone with a personal passion--or at least a genuine interest--in this genre.

And now it looks like I have a few more avenues to pursue. I had emailed the Library of Congress a week or so ago about this and just got a response. I'll post it here, just in case anyone else finds it useful (this is how it came to me):

We put out a number of titles on science fair materials for children and some guides to get girls interested in science, such as < http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/tracer-bullets/environmentaltb.html >, < http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/tracer-bullets/bio-agtb.html >, < http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/tracer-bullets/scifairtb.html >, < http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/tracer-bullets/spacesciencetb.html >, < http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/SciRefGuides/girlscience.html >, < http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/SciRefGuides/biowomen.html >, < http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/SciRefGuides/schoolgarden.html >, < http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/SciRefGuides/schoolgardenactivities.html >.  We are not children's science librarian's per se, but we do have an interest in children's interest in science and, because of the Copyright law, do have a large collection of children's science books.  The American Association for the Advancement in Science (AAAS), has a publication Science, Books & Films (SB&F) at < http://www.sbfonline.com/Pages/welcomesplash.aspx > that vets children's science books. Someone on its staff might know a children's librarian that would fit the bill or someone on the staff of the Smithsonian's National Science Resources Center at < http://www.nsrconline.org/ > might know one as well.  Have you tried the Carnegie Science Center at < http://www.carnegiesciencecenter.org/ >.  The Franklin Institute's Leap into Science program at < http://www.fi.edu/leap/ > might know some children's science librarians as well. I hope that these suggestions prove useful.  

At this point I'm just finding it interesting that what I thought was a simple question has turned out to be so complicated!
#11 - March 13, 2012, 06:06 PM
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