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Difference Between Northern and Southern Girls?

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Had no idea what you guys were talking about with all the mush, polenta, liver pudding talk, but when I saw that picture at the link above, I immediately thought "scrapple."  But it isn't really, is it?  Regardless, I don't think I'll be eating any . . .
#61 - February 03, 2012, 06:51 PM

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I've had scrapple. Very similar. Probably the same thing. It's usually a little spicier than the liver pudding/mush I've had. But still really, really good. We usually find scrapple in TN and VA, but no liver pudding/mush.

I won't make you eat it if you come and visit. Honest. :)
#62 - February 03, 2012, 07:53 PM
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#63 - February 03, 2012, 08:13 PM
Making metaphors out of molehills for over thirty years.

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That looks more like cornbread to me, but def not the liver mush that I'm used to! :)
#64 - February 03, 2012, 09:10 PM
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From my own observations (of Southern aunts and uncles who used to come out to see us), Southerners tend to be friendlier and better at establishing links with neighbors. And I know it's a stereotype, but I swear they all talked much more slowly, and used more 'pleases' and 'thank yous'.  They had a better sense of community too; when we visited our cousins in the Panhandle of Florida, they knew ALL their neighbors. I remember being horrified when my uncle offered a kid down the block a ride to school. We were all in the car, so it wasn't like he was doing something creepy -- but it just wasn't DONE in California to offer another kid a lift to school, unless you were best friends. 

As for food, my aunt kept a massive bottle of pickled pigs' feet in the garage; she saved the 'drippings' from any meat she cooked (to spread on bread -- always Wonder bread -- never wholemeal -- or cook vegetables with), and we grew up on cornbread, black-eyed peas, collard greens, turnips, and banana pudding. Nobody else in the neighborhood ate those things -- just us. And no summer was summer without plenty of iced tea, with lemon and sugar.

My mother said they used to scramble brains with eggs, for breakfast -- which is so horrible I can hardly stand to write about it. But liver mush?   :reaction
#65 - February 04, 2012, 04:14 AM

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But liver mush?   :reaction

Oh, boy.  :P I can't stand liver mush--not even the smell of it.

Also (especially around the marsh areas) there are a lot of alligators and wild hogs. And raccoons. Those pesky raccoons. . . they're everywhere:fury
#66 - February 04, 2012, 05:44 AM

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That looks more like cornbread to me, but def not the liver mush that I'm used to! :)

Cornbread has eggs and butter and milk and leavening; mush is just boiled cornmeal, shaped over night and fried the next day.
#67 - February 04, 2012, 06:13 AM
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GROUNDHUG DAY (Disney-Hyperion, 2017)
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What Anne Marie said ...

man, I'm getting hungry for mush .. I wonder if my kids would eat it.



#68 - February 04, 2012, 08:10 AM
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This thread is great! I've lived a lot of places (St. Augustine, Chicago, Wisconsin, Colorado, and my home, Indiana) - and the differences are what I love!
 
When I moved to Chicago from Seymour (IN), no one up there had ever heard of Big Red (cream soda) - and I was heartbroken, because I loved it! In Florida I was surprised at the Co-Cola or Coke for any type of pop (which was what we called it in IN & Chicago.) My grandmother (who raised me) always kept an empty Crisco can (they used to be all metal) on the stove to drain the bacon grease into (to be reused to fry up anything and to put on greens or green beans. Pan fried pork chops = YUM! And we always knew all our neighbors and went inside for home-made treats on Halloween! (Oh, Mrs. Nowlin's popcorn balls were to die for!) But - I grew up in a small town and that was normal.

When I moved to CO the western influence was charming! And, yeah... everything was foothills, front range, western slope - but I never got directionally lost because the mountains were always to the west! However, being out in CO last year, I was sad to see that cowboy hats weren't as in vogue as they were when I lived there (in the '70s.)

Cornmeal mush... add some sundried tomatoes and basil and you've got a rockin' gourmet polenta. Kind of like Pygmalion! ;)
#69 - February 04, 2012, 08:56 AM
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My mother's recipe book included instructions on how to skin and cook opossums. I still get weak in the knees remembering it.
#70 - February 04, 2012, 10:25 AM

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Ahem. Possum is not just for old cookbooks. My Joy of Cooking has a recipe for 'possum in the back of the Game section. If possible, trap 'possum and feed it on milk and cereals for 10 days before killing. Clean but do not skin... Unclear what a possum's cereal of preference is: I'm guessing you couldn't go wrong with Lucky Charms or Trix.

Also recipes for  :whitebunny, raccoon, bear, woodchuck, :moose und squirrel. I could eat out of our backyard! Except for the bear part. Which is OK because Irma & Marion say black bear isn't very good (unless it's 1795 and your name is Crockett).
#71 - February 04, 2012, 02:06 PM
« Last Edit: February 04, 2012, 02:07 PM by AnneB »

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My mush ain't got no meat in it.

mine neither!
#72 - February 04, 2012, 06:34 PM
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Ahem. Possum is not just for old cookbooks. My Joy of Cooking has a recipe for 'possum in the back of the Game section. If possible, trap 'possum and feed it on milk and cereals for 10 days before killing. Clean but do not skin... Unclear what a possum's cereal of preference is: I'm guessing you couldn't go wrong with Lucky Charms or Trix.


You mean I could have eaten those suckers my one dog used to kill in the back yard!  :ahh YUCK, I think digging a hole in the alleyway and burying them was the better thing to do.
#73 - February 04, 2012, 06:39 PM
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My mother said they used to scramble brains with eggs, for breakfast -- which is so horrible I can hardly stand to write about it. But liver mush?   :reaction

It is true.

My Aunt Bea did a sneaky thing. (And yes, she was really my Aunt Bea.)  
She scrambled the two ingredients together and gave it to us to eat.
THEN... after we'd eaten most of it... she told us what it was.

We. Were. HORRIFIED.

I still am.

And last year, I was at an authentic mexican restaurant with my friend, Rocio. I ordered my darling' daughters what I thought was "soft tacos". (I didn't really look at he name of the dish - but the english description had the term "soft meat" in it). I assumed I was doing something good.

But when I did, my sweet friend took pity on me and immediately stopped me, spoke quickly in spanish to the waitress and shook her head at me.

Apparently, I'd ordered a taco filled with BRAINS. yes. Brains. I had NO idea! Of course, had I paid more attention in my spanish class, I would have realized that the term "cabeza" refers to head.

Duh. DOnna.

My friend told me that the waitress had already written down the order of what she thought I had MEANT to order.. and she knew it wasn't the brainy tacos. She was right!

She was a fantastic waitress and got a VERY good tip! :)

(and my friend hasn't let me forget it!)
#74 - February 04, 2012, 06:58 PM
« Last Edit: February 04, 2012, 07:16 PM by DonnaE »
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As a northerner, here is what I have noticed:

-I spent an extended time in an urban area in the south, though not the deep south. People tended to move more slowly. Checking out at the grocery store took much longer than it does in New England. (I went to different chains in different cities, and this was pretty universal.)
-When visiting relatives in a rural area (again, not in the deep south) guns/hunting was much more prevalent. All of the kids said ma'am and sir, and people were generally focused on being courteous.
-I spent a couple of days with a group of college kids from a TX college. I'm not sure where they grew up - presumably they were from different areas - but based on accents they were mostly from the south. The girls seemed a little more focused on guys/relationships and getting married than my friends from home. They guys seemed more apt to be chivalrous. Funny story: At one point, one young man wanted to help me across a little stream (we were all on a hike). I declined, and he insisted on "spotting" me in case I fell. I had to fight feeling insulted and annoyed, but I knew he was trying to be considerate and kind so I forced a smile and said "thank you." I am confident that he wasn't trying to come on to me. I was with my boyfriend at the time - who was also from the north and knew better than to imply that I couldn't rock hop without help. The TX guys actually seemed pretty shocked that my boyfriend wasn't helping me out.
-Some people in the south really do seem to still be fighting the civil war and dislike "Yankees." I met many, many more people who were friendly and polite and delightful to speak with, but I was surprised to run into any anti-Yankee sentiment. 

Of course, there are certainly plenty of people that "break" any stereotype / generality. YMMV.
#75 - February 22, 2012, 06:39 AM

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As a northerner, here is what I have noticed:

-I spent an extended time in an urban area in the south, though not the deep south. People tended to move more slowly. Checking out at the grocery store took much longer than it does in New England. (I went to different chains in different cities, and this was pretty universal.)
-When visiting relatives in a rural area (again, not in the deep south) guns/hunting was much more prevalent. All of the kids said ma'am and sir, and people were generally focused on being courteous.
-I spent a couple of days with a group of college kids from a TX college. I'm not sure where they grew up - presumably they were from different areas - but based on accents they were mostly from the south. The girls seemed a little more focused on guys/relationships and getting married than my friends from home. They guys seemed more apt to be chivalrous. Funny story: At one point, one young man wanted to help me across a little stream (we were all on a hike). I declined, and he insisted on "spotting" me in case I fell. I had to fight feeling insulted and annoyed, but I knew he was trying to be considerate and kind so I forced a smile and said "thank you." I am confident that he wasn't trying to come on to me. I was with my boyfriend at the time - who was also from the north and knew better than to imply that I couldn't rock hop without help. The TX guys actually seemed pretty shocked that my boyfriend wasn't helping me out.
-Some people in the south really do seem to still be fighting the civil war and dislike "Yankees." I met many, many more people who were friendly and polite and delightful to speak with, but I was surprised to run into any anti-Yankee sentiment.  

Of course, there are certainly plenty of people that "break" any stereotype / generality. YMMV.

Hi Elyse,

Great, detailed answer. Everyone's answers are helping me a lot. Thank you!

Quick question: How notorious are SCADS? Have anyone not in the Georgia area heard of them before? If you say SCADS in Georgia people automatically know who you're referring to. But what about other parts of the country?

 :eh2 They're probably a few people scratching their head right now, wondering what I'm talking about. SCADS stands for Savannah College of Art and Design Students.
#76 - March 09, 2012, 04:33 AM
« Last Edit: March 12, 2012, 05:29 AM by Woods »

Nope, sorry.  But I have heard of that school.  I think I saw a sign or something when I went to Savannah once.
#77 - March 09, 2012, 04:43 AM

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I know someone who attended that school but I don't know that nickname.
#78 - March 09, 2012, 04:50 AM
VAMPIRINA BALLERINA series (Disney-Hyperion)
SUNNY'S TOW TRUCK SAVES THE DAY (Abrams)
GROUNDHUG DAY (Disney-Hyperion, 2017)
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Woods,

I'm in NJ.

My senior daughter has had LOTS of promo-material and phone calls from SCAD. They had reps come to her art classes and have pursued her.

I know most of the art colleges in the country and SCAD is very well known in the art communities in the US.

I know a hand full of kids from our high school in NJ who go there and love it.

It also stands for SCAD: Sentimental, Condescending, Anthropomorphic and Didactic in the It's a Bunny-Eat-Bunny World Book. ;}
#79 - March 09, 2012, 05:39 AM
What's for pudding, Mimmy?

Illustration website:

http://www.puddintanesbrain.com

www.puddersputter.blogspot.com

I know of them from having been in animation and from helping research art schools for my daughter, but never knew their acronym.  I don't think it's as widely-known an acronym as, say, RISD.
#80 - March 09, 2012, 10:22 AM
« Last Edit: March 09, 2012, 10:26 AM by LeslieG »

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My senior daughter has had LOTS of promo-material and phone calls from SCAD. They had reps come to her art classes and have pursued her.


Wow, AE, that's amazing! Your daughter must be extremely talented. What kind of art does she do?
#81 - March 12, 2012, 05:28 AM

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I lived in Georgia for over 30 years. Never heard of SCADS.
#82 - March 12, 2012, 07:52 AM
Making metaphors out of molehills for over thirty years.

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