SCBWI's Blueboard - A Message & Chat Board

Anglican vs. Episcopalian

Discussion started on

Member
Poster Plus
What are the difference in these religions? Some places I've read say they are the same thing but others say the names aren't interchangeable. Direction to any helpful resources would be appreciated.

Thanks.
#1 - April 28, 2012, 05:24 PM
To the Stars! (Charlesbridge)
Aviation: Cool Women Who Fly (Nomad Press)
Eliza Bing Is (Not) A Big, Fat Quitter (Holiday House)

Admins and Mods Emeriti
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region midatlantic
The Anglican Communion is an association of churches in full communion with the Church of England.  The Wikipedia page would give you a good oversight.

The Episcopal church in the United States that most people think of is called The Episcopal Church or alternately the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America.   

A few years ago, there was a schism in the Episcopal Church in America and the conservatives broke off to form the Anglican Church in North America.  I believe both churches are still in the Anglican Communion but they are no longer together.  The Anglican Church in NA looks to a presiding bishop in Nigeria, whereas TEC still looks to the same American bishop as before.

Are there specific things you want to know?  I would suggest checking out the church's websites.
#2 - April 28, 2012, 05:45 PM
VAMPIRINA BALLERINA series (Disney-Hyperion)
SUNNY'S TOW TRUCK SAVES THE DAY (Abrams)
GROUNDHUG DAY (Disney-Hyperion, 2017)
among others

Definitely not interchangeable, but the same roots. The episcopal church in America came out of the Anglican church in England (which of course came out of the Catholic church...) I used to attend both - I went to Anglican churches when I lived in England (briefly) and an Episcopal church in college - similar liturgy - totally different feel and message.
#3 - April 28, 2012, 05:59 PM
Robin

Member
Poster Plus
I used to attend both - I went to Anglican churches when I lived in England (briefly) and an Episcopal church in college - similar liturgy - totally different feel and message.

How so? If you don't  mind me asking.
#4 - April 28, 2012, 07:27 PM
To the Stars! (Charlesbridge)
Aviation: Cool Women Who Fly (Nomad Press)
Eliza Bing Is (Not) A Big, Fat Quitter (Holiday House)

Member.
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region midsouth
  • SCBWI PAL
The Anglican churches that split from the Episcopalian church tend to be more socially conservative--that is a large part of why they decided to leave the Episcopalian church. Even though there are official reasons for the separation, it really came down to the ordination of gay/lesbian priests. The Anglican churches that left the Episcopal church disagreed with that policy.

I think Lill's description of different congregations is a good one. I've heard an Episcopal priest say during his sermon that there are many paths to God, not just Christianity. And my childhood church has a Tiffany window donated by a wealthy parishioner about 100 years ago and handmade needlepoint covers for the kneelers that are at least as old as my parents.
#5 - April 28, 2012, 10:43 PM

jeffman

Guest
In the American (Episcopalian) versions, you can see a huge difference between so-called High church and low church. High church resembles Catholic church a lot more in terms of liturgy, priests' clothing, sacrament, and so on. If the church has maintained a consistent feeling, the older, more Gothic looking structures may be high church, which gives them that same Catholic feeling also. But any structure, old or new, can house high church or low church. In a low church, you're more likely to get that homey feel, with a more pop-music sound, and Sunday-school decorations posted in the main body of the church, not just the basement. A lot of low Episcopal churches have that elongated 1-story, red-brick 1950's feel, but that's a tendency, not a rule.
#6 - April 28, 2012, 10:58 PM

Global Moderator
Poster Plus
  • **
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region carolinas
Fascinating. I grew up in the Anglican church in India and it's pretty much like the Catholic church (conservative, very traditional liturgy). I didn't know about these distinctions in the US, but when we started to look for a church (after 30 years), I naturally looked into the Anglican church, but found quite a bit of variation from what I remembered.

Car, it seems that regions will make a difference, so you'll want to talk to someone from the community where you set your book.

Vijaya (who is Catholic now)
#7 - April 30, 2012, 05:38 AM
BOUND (Bodach Books, 2018)
TEN EASTER EGGS (Scholastic, 2015)
www.vijayabodach.blogspot.com
Author of over 60 books and 60 magazine pieces

Members:

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.