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Re: Whatcha reading?

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mswatkins

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I picked up "The Eyeball Collector" on a whim.  I must say, I made an excellent choice.  I'm going to checkout more F.E. Higgins' books.
#601 - August 26, 2013, 06:19 PM

Dionna

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Capture the Flag by Kate Messner
#602 - August 26, 2013, 06:25 PM
« Last Edit: September 01, 2013, 09:16 PM by Dionna »

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I just finished THE CUCKOO'S CALLING. Love. It's another "mourning period" book.
#603 - September 03, 2013, 11:44 AM

I just started Mark Helprin's Winter's Tale. I'm only a couple chapters in, but I'm already loving his use of description and sly sense of humor... :yup

#604 - September 03, 2013, 03:09 PM
"This is your life and you be what you want to be.
Just don't hurt nobody, 'less of course they ask you."

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I read The Doll Bones by Holly Black which I thought was pretty good.

I'm about to finish A Boy and A Bear in A Boat by Dave Shelton. It's been a fun read so far and the illustrations are so adorable.
#605 - September 04, 2013, 06:36 PM
THE SECRET OF FERRELL SAVAGE
Atheneum (Simon & Schuster) February, 2014

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THE RETURNED (debut novel) by Jason Mott is absolutely wonderful!  Such a gifted, beautiful writer!
#606 - September 04, 2013, 06:54 PM

smichel

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Reading The Forest of Hands and Teeth - finally! I'm not big into zombie novels but I'm enjoying this one.
#607 - September 05, 2013, 08:18 PM

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A MG magical-realism mystery, THE WATER CASTLE by Megan Frazer Blakemore. Very absorbing.

Also started BEHOLDING BEE by Kimberly Newton Fusco (contemporary MG).
#608 - September 06, 2013, 06:13 AM
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Just finished Washington Burning by Les Standiford. I had a hard go of the first few chapters but loved the parts about the War of 1812. By the end, I could see what the author was going for and quite enjoyed it. I'm finding that I like non-fiction much more than I thought I would  ::-). Especially after scanning the Barnes and Noble non-fiction section--if only I could pull off a Mixed up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler stunt and move into the store for a few weeks.

My next non-fiction goal is to find a good one on the Tudors.
#609 - September 10, 2013, 03:10 PM
« Last Edit: September 10, 2013, 03:13 PM by J.Swan »
Seek ye out of the best books...
http://dewdropsofink.blogspot.com

Finished the audio of the acclaimed 2010 novel ROOM by Donoghue. It's the story of a mother and son held in captivity, so that the five-year-old boy, who narrates the book, has never seen anything but the interior of the 11x11 foot room. It's a tour de force of voice, and although clearly an adult novel (short-listed for the Booker), it's a great model for any writer using a first-person child narrator. The audio uses a number of narrators, and although the child's voice is off-putting at first, it becomes absolutely haunting. I found myself hearing it as I went through the day, as if little Jack were telling me what I was seeing. One of my favorite audio books ever.

Speaking of serious novelists, I finished SLAM today, a 2007 YA novel by Nick Hornby (HIGH FIDELITY, ABOUT A BOY). I love reading children's books by accomplished novelists and this has a great narrative voice of a British 15-16 yo skateboarder who finds himself moving from childhood into an adult-sized mess way before he's ready.

Another September read wasTHE WHITE DARKNESS, the 2008 Printz winner by Geraldine McCaughrean. Not an all-time favorite but a sophisticated, stylish narrative which clearly earned the attention it received. I also recently finished up McCann's TRANSATLANTIC, a 2013 adult novel which should be in the mix for a lot of literary awards. Loved the opening section about the men who made the first transatlantic flight.

After reading the Hornby book I stumbled onto his column in The Believer Magazine, Stuff I've Been Reading. OMG, so many books, so little time. You can read his lists here: http://www.believermag.com/contributors/?read=hornby,+nick
#610 - September 11, 2013, 08:27 PM
« Last Edit: September 11, 2013, 08:29 PM by LTMadison »
In Real Life, Tuttle Publishing, Fall 2014

Forgive me for going on...and on. But I thought this quote from a Nick Hornby interview would be of general interest:

"The big influences on me when I was starting out as a writer were Anne Tyler, Lorrie Moore, Roddy Doyle and Tobias Wolff. They all had qualities I badly wanted to steal! I’ve been discovering YA authors since I wrote Slam, and I’ve been knocked out by what I’ve read. MT Anderson’s Feed, for example, seems to me to be a modern classic. And I loved David Almond’s Skellig and Francesca Lia Block’s Weetzie Bat."

I'm with him on all the adult novelists and FEED, but don't know the other two books. Should I?

P.S. Roddy Doyle did a MG book called Wilderness (2007) which, to my memory, wasn't nearly up to his adult standards.
#611 - September 11, 2013, 08:43 PM
In Real Life, Tuttle Publishing, Fall 2014

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I like Nick Hornby's novels a lot, especially ABOUT A BOY. Thanks for sharing, LT. I'm reading three books of essays right now.
#612 - September 11, 2013, 09:05 PM
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And I loved David Almond’s Skellig and Francesca Lia Block’s Weetzie Bat." I'm with him on all the adult novelists and FEED, but don't know the other two books. Should I?

Skellig is a transcendent novel. And Weetzie Bat is a classic, although not to everyone's taste.

I'm reading an adult novel, Fin & Lady by Cathleen Schine, about an 11-year-old orphaned boy living with his 24-year-old sister in 1960's Greenwich Village. Charming so far.
#613 - September 12, 2013, 06:07 PM

The last book I finished was THE BIG SHORT about the 2008 financial crisis. A really interesting apolitical look at what happened through the people who saw it coming and profited on it.
#614 - September 12, 2013, 06:19 PM
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The Vanishing of Katharina Linden, by Helen Grant. Normally I dislike adult novels, but I enjoyed this one (since it won an Alex award for being a book teens are likely to enjoy, there may be something in that...) It takes place in Germany and is so VERY real-life German that it made me smile. No beer-swilling drunken American tourists in THIS book...
#615 - September 12, 2013, 06:32 PM

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I recently read "When You Reach Me" and (hanging head in shame) I only remember the author's first name was Rebecca.  Great plot; believable characters; good voice; fast pace.

But at our book fair last spring I also pitched "Out of my Mind" by Sharon Draper and "Hide and Seek" by Katy Grant.  We sold out of both titles. The first one is superb as an anti-bullying book and just to make kids realize that non-verbal doesn't mean ignorant. The second involves geo-caching and also a good mystery. Both books make for great discussions with kids after they've read them.
#616 - September 15, 2013, 08:46 PM
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Rebecca Stead wrote WHEN YOU REACH ME, which is set in the late 70's (a historical novel!) and has ongoing references to A STITCH IN TIME and although realistic in detail, has some time travel/science fiction elements.  It won a 2010 Newbery. I'd also recommend her more recent LIARS & SPY, also set in the New York, this one contemporary. Both are considered MG and have 12-13-year-old protagonists, but are sophisticated enough to be of interest to older readers as well.
#617 - September 16, 2013, 07:23 AM
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I believe it's A WRINKLE IN TIME, by writer Madeleine L'Engle.
#618 - September 16, 2013, 05:15 PM

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mrh, thanks for reminding me about BEHOLDING BEE. Need to put it on my library holds list.
I just finished COUNTING BY 7s. Middle grade, but appealing to adults in the vein of WONDER. A book that will stick with you for a long time. Heartfelt.

Am starting SURE SIGNS OF CRAZY. (MG)
#619 - September 16, 2013, 06:45 PM

Whoops. A Wrinkle in Time, of course! (I last read it the year it was published -- 1962.)
#620 - September 16, 2013, 07:25 PM
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I'm reading The Eye of the Storm ny Kate Messner.
#621 - September 17, 2013, 07:06 AM
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Rereading THE HOUSE OF THE SCORPION, by Nancy Farmer. What a fine book! I'm dying to read the sequel, but I haven't decided if I should ask for it for Christmas, or pick it up right now...
#622 - September 18, 2013, 08:46 AM

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I stole OUT OF MY MIND by Sharon Draper from my son's room. I love it so far.
#623 - September 18, 2013, 08:58 AM

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This week I finished The Time Fetch by Amy Herrick. It was a good read, quite different from anything else I've read. I also read The Hypnotists by Gordon Korman, the first book in a trilogy. A good, fun read, terrific for boys.

LindaB
#624 - September 19, 2013, 11:58 AM

I just finished CROCKETT JOHNSON AND RUTH KRAUSS: HOW AN UNLIKELY COUPLE FOUND LOVE, DODGED THE FBI, AND TRANSFORMED CHILDREN'S LITERATURE. It's a great insight into some of the most crucially formative years and personalities in kidlit, especially for picture books.
#625 - September 20, 2013, 11:13 AM

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I just finished CROCKETT JOHNSON AND RUTH KRAUSS: HOW AN UNLIKELY COUPLE FOUND LOVE, DODGED THE FBI, AND TRANSFORMED CHILDREN'S LITERATURE. It's a great insight into some of the most crucially formative years and personalities in kidlit, especially for picture books.

I cannot wait to read this. Thanks for posting it here!  :thankyou
#626 - September 20, 2013, 11:20 AM

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Rae Carson's THE BITTER KINGDOM (last book in the Girl of Fire and Thorns series). So good!

I haven't heard of that book, Rae, but it sounds really good! I'll have to put it on my list.
#627 - September 20, 2013, 11:21 AM

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UNDERCURRENT by Paul Blackwell
Great read!
#628 - September 22, 2013, 09:55 AM

cindymbohn

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I've been on a Sci-Fi/Fantasy streak lately. I've been reading the Miles Vorkosigan books by Lois McMaster Bujold. I also finished Delirium by Lauren Oliver, I think. I enjoyed it, but didn't quite connect as much as I thought I would. Don't know if it was the wrong time for the book, or if it was just the wrong book.
#629 - September 22, 2013, 12:50 PM

cindymbohn

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I forgot - I stayed up late reading Catch Me by Lisa Gardner. My first book by this author, and I really enjoyed it.  ::-)
#630 - September 22, 2013, 12:55 PM

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