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Rant--American?

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MaryWitzl

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I feel ridiculous asking this, but is 'getting a rant' American? Here in Scotland, if you get lectured by someone, you get a rant. I'm assuming this isn't American, but I honestly thought that 'clueless' was British until someone here assured me it was originally American. I'm beginning to realize that the origins of a lot of terms are blurring for me, having lived outside the States for so long. So, what IS the American term for getting a rant? We called it getting bawled out when I was a kid, but I'm beginning to distrust my own instincts...

Can anybody help?
#1 - November 30, 2012, 01:58 PM

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I've heard of someone ranting, but never "getting a rant."  "Getting bawled out" is more common.
#2 - November 30, 2012, 02:02 PM
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MaryWitzl

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Thank you, Anne Marie. I'll stick with 'getting bawled out' and just pray it's still in vogue.
#3 - November 30, 2012, 02:06 PM

You could say 'ranted at me/him/her'. That works.
#4 - November 30, 2012, 02:09 PM
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Around here, we'd say getting lectured or getting chewed out (CO).
#5 - November 30, 2012, 02:25 PM
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Or, you can say, "He really went off on me." Sounds weird, but we say that a lot. We don't get rants from others, we go on rants ourselves!
#6 - November 30, 2012, 04:04 PM

I'm beginning to realize that the origins of a lot of terms are blurring for me, having lived outside the States for so long.

Ah, I know that feeling. I think the others are right--ranting can be American, but "getting a rant" sounds funny to me. I like Lynn's suggestion.
#7 - November 30, 2012, 04:23 PM
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Here (in the Upper Midwest, at least), one goes on a rant, or rants, but I've never heard it used by the rantee to describe the situation of being the object of a rant. I'd tend to use scolded or yelled at or told off, but it all depends on the age of the speaker, I suppose.  :old
#8 - November 30, 2012, 04:53 PM

Yep - rant is personal, something you do. :) But people do "go off" on you or whatever. I would understand "bawled out" but it wouldn't be something my kids' would say. They might say "he freaked out on me" or "went off"...
#9 - November 30, 2012, 05:35 PM
Robin

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"To go off" is like a bomb going off or exploding -- I bet that's where the expression comes from.

"Bawled out" would something an authority person did -- a parent, teacher, or boss. But anyone can go off on anyone, regardless of power dynamics -- a customer at a cashier, the cashier at a customer, a teacher, a friend, etc. I think it's probably the most common these days.
#10 - November 30, 2012, 05:45 PM
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I'm with lynnalpert and Kell. "He really went off on me" would be more up to date than "He bawled me out."

Rants are something we do, not something we receive. We go off on a rant, or we simply rant, but we don't GET a rant.
#11 - November 30, 2012, 07:14 PM
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