SCBWI's Blueboard - A Message & Chat Board

What's your preferred method of coloring your drawings for books?

Discussion started on

Global Moderator
Poster Plus
  • **
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region canadaeast
Wow, that's even higher than I thought it would be!

Do keep in mind though, that percentage doesn't mean all CREATED digitally. But I just know so many Illustrators that might sketch on paper, then scan and work on it in PS or Painter, or they paint, then scan in and tweak, add but yes, end up with digital files for the publisher.
I've not done a Commercial book in years, but even in the Scholastic Ed contract it states that the files will be digitally delivered. Of course, depending on how the Illustrator works and HOW much the publisher wants that Illustrator, there are always exceptions to every rule. (that's that other 2% I suppose:)

Anyone using Painter? I just find that so much of the digital art that I admire, I find out from the Illustrator they used Painter as opposed to PS. Painter doesn't allow for CMYK but they convert it in PS (later?)
I had that free 30 day trial of Painter years ago, but didn't spend enough time trying it out and didn't have the Cintiq back then. With the PS cloud business... that may be another reason for me to take the Painter plunge but learning new/different programs/things, hurts my old brain just thinking about it:)
#31 - June 03, 2013, 02:17 AM
"Penelope and the Humongous Burp"
"Penelope and the Monsters"
"Penelope and the Preposterous Birthday Party"

Official Shenaniganizer
Emeritus
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region canadawest
With the PS cloud business... that may be another reason for me to take the Painter plunge but learning new/different programs/things, hurts my old brain just thinking about it:)

I'd heard something about that. They won't be offering Creative Suite anymore but a subscription service or something?

There is another thread here with a lot of talk about a program called Artrage that some illustrators are doing some amazing things with. I'd love to try that one. I haven't tried Painter before. But I remember using Corel Draw 15-20 years ago, lol.
#32 - June 03, 2013, 12:05 PM
THIS LITTLE PIGGY (AN OWNER'S MANUAL), Aladdin PIX June 2017 :pigsnort
KUNG POW CHICKEN 1-4, Scholastic 2014 :chicken

http://cyndimarko.com
@cynmarko

"Anyone using Painter? I just find that so much of the digital art that I admire, I find out from the Illustrator they used Painter as opposed to PS. Painter doesn't allow for CMYK but they convert it in PS (later?)"

I like Painter a lot - it's a lot more intuitive (for me, anyway), than, say, Adobe Illustrator. The main problem I've heard of with it is that it's prone to crashing (at least the version we had at my school), so make sure to save your work often, especially if it seems like it's starting to drag in reaction time! I avoided many crashing problems by avoiding the larger brush sizes.

And, I don't know how I feel about the Adobe Cloud... it's good for people who want to try it out, but I think it's a bit of a highway robbery in the end - in my mind, the monthly fee going to quickly overvalue the product. I wish they didn't make it the only option (other than quickly snagging CS6, or whichever program before they drop it).
#33 - June 03, 2013, 12:38 PM

Member.
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI Region rmc
  • SCBWI PAL
I actually do a huge amont of my drawing in PS - moving things around in layers and then go traditional for the final- fabric collaging and stitching - then photograph then back into photoshop to edit and send a digital file- so I'm 50-50.
#34 - June 03, 2013, 08:50 PM

Rock of The Westies
Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region nevada
I know someone who used to airbrush and then go over with colored pencil. They now start with graphite original, scans and  color washes in photoshop, then prints on art paper and goes over it with a colored pencil. I'm not sure about the ink that's used though. Applying some mediums may make it run. It would seem it may make a difference . . . but only if adding paints. Possibly with just colored pencils going over the work, it isn't an issue? I would sure like to try it.
#35 - June 05, 2013, 08:37 PM
« Last Edit: June 06, 2013, 12:20 PM by Cynthia Kremsner »
Fur Balls & Feathers & Fins, Oh My! Animals Are My Kind of People
 www.cynthiakremsner.com

OddBerryCreations

Guest
Wow, look at all of the information you guys are sharing!!! When I first started this post, I had NO idea there would be such a wealth of tips shared. You guys rock!!

Since I originally posted this, I have begun doing my own research and have figured out a couple of things. I always start out traditional. There's just something about taking a pencil and paper and figuring out what to do next. Then, I typically scan the image into the computer and adjust it in PS. From here, it just depends on what I want to do. I'm not working full time at any of this yet, I'm still just trying to figure out what my preferred method is but I'll either leave it in PS and mess around with painting it or I'll send it over to Illustrator to vectorize it or set it up to go into After Effects. For those that don't know, After Effects is a cool software that animates videos and images. I'm learning it because I hope to illustrate as well as animate eventually. This much I have discovered. Thank you all so much for your added tips and suggestions. You guys are awesome!!

 :goldstar :goldstar :goldstar
#36 - June 06, 2013, 09:41 AM

Rock of The Westies
Member
Poster Plus
  • *
  • SCBWI Member
  • SCBWI PAL
  • SCBWI Region nevada
It is cool to look at others' works and find out what they do to master it . . . for sure. The trick is in the mastering. There are so many techniques and mediums I really want to try. The above one, adding traditional AFTER digital and gouache for another. I read in some respects, they can be like watercolors as you can dilute them to make the opacity lighter. (I'm not sure about layering though as watercolors give such great affect by adding colors over others after they've dried). In any case, it's always fun to see how the looks are achieved. I've come across some by happy mistake. But only once or twice.  :oops: :bananadance
#37 - June 06, 2013, 12:29 PM
Fur Balls & Feathers & Fins, Oh My! Animals Are My Kind of People
 www.cynthiakremsner.com

Members:

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.