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Do "sure" and "poor" rhyme?

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Nope, not to my ear.
Ditto. Sorry. Even Rhyme Zone offers few choices. The closest I could find is "oor" words, like "door," or "floor."
http://www.rhymezone.com/
#31 - August 15, 2013, 08:02 AM
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Thanks, everyone! I had no idea this pronunciation was confined to such a small area. I am glad a few people from my neck of the woods chimed in so I know I am not insane (TH, I'm from Poughkeepsie). The weird thing is that I have lived in Minnesota for 25 years and never noticed that I pronounce them "wrong" until my darling daughter pointed it out repeatedly.

Interestingly, my print rhyming dictionary includes all of the words that rhyme with "poor" in my world. British influence, perhaps?

Just out of curiosity... Do the rest of you pronounce the surname "Moore" (as in Lorrie Moore) the same as "More" (Thomas More). And what about moor? My head is spinning!

Thanks to everyone who took the time to respond.
#32 - August 15, 2013, 08:54 AM
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On TV westerns the cowboys always said "shore" for "sure," but otherwise I don't think they usually rhyme (and I grew up in CT).
#33 - August 15, 2013, 09:18 AM

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NO way do "sure" and "poor" rhyme.  UNLESS... you're a country and western singer... :music: He SHO is PO. :music:
#34 - August 15, 2013, 09:31 AM

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I'm from Philadelphia, and they rhyme here -- SHORE and PORE.  MOORE and MORE and MOOR are all the same, as are Moorestown and Morristown, NJ. DOOR, FLOOR, WORE, TORE, NOR.  TOUR and POUR are pretty close but a slightly longer O and R sound -- TOORR, POORR.


Haha, Dionna!
#35 - August 15, 2013, 09:46 AM
« Last Edit: August 15, 2013, 09:54 AM by Kell »
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Quote
Just out of curiosity... Do the rest of you pronounce the surname "Moore" (as in Lorrie Moore) the same as "More" (Thomas More). And what about moor? My head is spinning!

For me, no. Moor, moore, poor, tour, sure --same vowel sound, a tighter "oo". More, shore, four, pour, for --same vowel sound, kind of an "aw".

Funny enough, I just had my husband pronounce them, and they ALL sound like they rhyme!

Anyway, does it matter that most publishers are in the NYC area? :)

Seems like you might have enough reason to change it. On the other hand, you could always call it a near rhyme.

I would probably look for alternatives and see if I liked anything better, just to avoid the whole issue.

LOL, Dionna!

And Jonathan, above, I sure am a poor judge, too.  ;D
#36 - August 15, 2013, 10:36 AM
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Diana M!!!

Do "More, shore, four, pour, for" really sound like "paw" where you are???? WHOA, horsey!! I cain't believe it!

I don't think I would use words that only rhyme in the vernacular unless the story's setting or narrator is from a particular place and maybe you spell the words phonetically???

Y'all  sur' are po'!

But I've heard that vernacular spelling (like in Br'er Rabbit) is not the thing to do these days.

HAPPY RHYMING!!
#37 - August 15, 2013, 11:01 AM

#38 - August 15, 2013, 11:07 AM
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Diana M!!!

Do "More, shore, four, pour, for" really sound like "paw" where you are???? WHOA, horsey!! I cain't believe it!

I don't think I would use words that only rhyme in the vernacular unless the story's setting or narrator is from a particular place and maybe you spell the words phonetically???

Y'all  sur' are po'!

But I've heard that vernacular spelling (like in Br'er Rabbit) is not the thing to do these days.

HAPPY RHYMING!!


Dionna, actually, no. I didn't mean exactly like the "aw" in "paw". Hmmmmm. I'm not quite sure how to write what I mean by the sound. This is how shore is written on dictionary.com: [shawr, shohr]
#39 - August 15, 2013, 11:23 AM
« Last Edit: August 15, 2013, 11:29 AM by DianaM »
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(so said the lady from New Yawk)

By the way, anyone read "The Wicked Big Toddlah"? Funny stuff.
#40 - August 15, 2013, 11:28 AM
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My Pocket Rhyming Dictionary says NO they don't. DOOR is under -or, with FOUR, and SURE is under -oor with TOUR. Hope that helps.
#41 - August 15, 2013, 11:40 AM

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They do to me, but I'm a half-deaf "furrenehr."

I'd go with what all them natives^ say.  :grin3
#42 - August 15, 2013, 11:45 AM
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By the way, anyone read "The Wicked Big Toddlah"? Funny stuff.

Sounds wickedly funny!!
#43 - August 15, 2013, 11:52 AM

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Hey! Hey! What's wrong with "wicked" as an adverbial intensifier?  :nanana:

I love those maps, kittypye--and totally fit within my geographic region.
#44 - August 15, 2013, 12:33 PM
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Moor, moore, poor, tour, sure --same vowel sound, a tighter "oo".

Yes! My "sure" is more like "sher", though. But my MN accent is so strong that I make the actors in "Fargo" sound like national news broadcasters.
#45 - August 15, 2013, 01:46 PM

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Hey! Hey! What's wrong with "wicked" as an adverbial intensifier?  :nanana:

Do tell!
#46 - August 15, 2013, 02:35 PM

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Those maps are great and 100% accurate for what I say. I was amazed that there was even a debate about some of them...
#47 - August 15, 2013, 03:39 PM
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Just out of curiosity... Do the rest of you pronounce the surname "Moore" (as in Lorrie Moore) the same as "More" (Thomas More). And what about moor? My head is spinning!

Just to add a little interest here, my mother's maiden name is Mohr. It is pronounced "more."  "Moore" and "moor" are also pronounced the same (as each other), with the vowel sound more like "moon." My mother said she was sometimes mistakenly referred to as "Moore," so for her there was a definite pronunciation difference. It's possible it might be subtler to others. In casual conversation, the difference can be hard to hear.
#48 - August 15, 2013, 03:52 PM
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I agree with Andrea, sometimes I say shur and sometimes I say shore depending on context. Shur, I'll go. I'm not shore. All the 'mores' sound the same to me here in New England. Fun stuff!
#49 - August 15, 2013, 04:17 PM
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I love these fascinating pronunciation discussions.  (I also love how there's a huge pocket of "brew-thru" around Virginia Beach on one of those maps!) I found my pronunciation did not go along with the color for my area most of the time, but that's not a shocker.  NC has a wide variety of people and your pronunciation/word choice depends on a lot of things--how "rural" your lifestyle is, if you or your parents are native, your education level, and what region of the state you live in, etc.  I was born here, but my parents weren't.  I don't speak like a stereotypical native, but I'll argue all day that I sound a lot like a "typical" North Carolinian--almost everyone I know/hang out with/went to school with sounds just like me.  But there's a big part of the population that speaks in a very "country" way--and these rural accents also greatly differ within the state.  I can also hear a NC/SC accent on professional actors who are speaking "standard" English, as I'm sure other people around the country can detect their own locals.

I'm fascinated with this stuff--have you ever watched those YouTube videos where people attempt to X number of different accents in 2 minutes or whatever?  And then everyone else comments about how "accurate" or not they were.  Fun!

I also love actors and actresses who can cross over between accents and fool my ear into thinking it was native.

Back on topic, the names "Moore" and "More" sound the same to me, I think--I had no idea there was a different pronunciation.  The word "moor" is said differently to me--it sounds a bit like "moo-er" (but not quite as exaggerated as that!).  Moore and More sound like poor, while moor sounds more like pure.  I can say sure like "shoo-er" but I feel a little pretentious/fakey doing that--like saying "humor" "yew-mer."

This thread reminds me of these marvelous electronic flashcards I got my daughter on our i-devices.  Daughter is autistic, so these "cards" with their realistic photos of objects plus the written word and a woman's voice pronouncing the word out loud were just perfect for her language acquisition.  The only thing was that the person doing the pronouncing was from . . . well, I don't know--somewhere in the midwest?  It was only apparent for words like "measuring cup."  How do you say that?

For everyone I know, it's MEH-zuring cup.  But flashcard lady says "MAY-zuring cup." 
#50 - August 17, 2013, 06:34 AM
« Last Edit: August 17, 2013, 06:48 AM by Jaina »


For everyone I know, it's MEH-zuring cup.  But flashcard lady says "MAY-zuring cup." 

I think you're correct about the Midwest because flashcard lady would fit right in in Nebraska.
#51 - August 17, 2013, 06:43 AM

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I say MEH-zuring cup, and I'm from Missouri (which ends with an i, by the way, and not an a).  :yup
#52 - August 17, 2013, 11:38 AM
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For everyone I know, it's MEH-zuring cup.  But flashcard lady says "MAY-zuring cup." 

Flashcard lady could be from Idaho. People here say MAY-zure, and think we live in the TRAY-sure Valley. I've got to admit, for this girl who grew up in the Northeast, it makes me a little  :hairpull .
#53 - August 17, 2013, 03:48 PM

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My mother was from Ohio, and they would have rhymed for her. When I was a kid she was always trying to get me to say it that way ... I always said "pore."
#54 - August 17, 2013, 04:59 PM
Making metaphors out of molehills for over thirty years.

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I concur that here in MA, poor does indeed rhyme with sure (pronounced as shoor, and also rhymes with tour.)
#55 - August 17, 2013, 06:23 PM
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Nope, not to this KY gal's ear.
#56 - August 17, 2013, 07:44 PM

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Yes ....  my mother pronounced poor to rhyme with tour. Pour rhymed with shore. Pure would rhyme with sure.
#57 - August 17, 2013, 08:02 PM
Making metaphors out of molehills for over thirty years.

I'm from Texas and I'd say they don't rhyme, but my hubby is from Philadelphia and he says they definitely rhyme. We've now been debating this for ten minutes.  :haha
#58 - August 17, 2013, 08:35 PM

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Rhymes for this Australian :) Sounds like I have more linguistic allies in the Northeast!
#59 - August 18, 2013, 03:44 AM

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I think they rhyme.

(Southern Ontario)
#60 - August 18, 2013, 04:16 PM
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