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Juvenile diabetes

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Need some help.
My uncle was type one diabetic and was diagnosed at 27. He took insulin shots once a day and lived to the ripe age of 89. He would have diabetic "reactions" usually when dinner was late, and was stopped a few times driving because it looked like he was driving drunk (which he wasn't.)
One of my characters was diagnosed with juvenile Diabetes and takes insulin shots. She was diagnosed at fourteen and is seventeen. I know great strides have been made in the study and understanding of diabetes. I'm wondering if I can go off of what my uncle did with his disease? I've done some research but there are some things I need.
Does it have to be refrigerated? (My uncle's did) What's the difference between shots and pills? My uncle took OJ or sucked on a hard piece of candy if he was having a reaction. Is that what people still do?
Any information from a nurse/diabetic/ or parent of a juvenile diabetic would be much appreciated.


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#1 - June 22, 2014, 01:13 PM

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I had a friend who was type I diabetic. Diagnosed at eight or nine as I remember. She had a pump, so no need for finger pricks or injections. She kept it tucked in her bra. It would beep from time to time and she'd pull it out and check it. She started having a reaction one time with me and asked for juice or candy. She asked if she was acting drunk. She wasn't, but we got her something to eat and she was fine after that. This was about ten or fifteen years ago.

Hope that helps!

Rue
#2 - June 22, 2014, 02:23 PM
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It does! Every bit helps. Thanks!
#3 - June 22, 2014, 03:26 PM

As someone who did a lot of medical writing on diabetes: Insulin for shots is usually refrigerated. Pills for diabetes are designed more for type 2, adult onset, and are not insulin. They are to help your body process blood sugar in a variety of ways. My cousin who is type one also has a pump for insulin. OJ, hard candies, and sugar packets are still used to treat dangerously low blood sugar. It's important to eat meals on time and to be very cautious in heat and while exercising.

The CDC has great resources for diabetes, but make sure you are looking at info for type 1, since the causes and symptoms are a bit different. http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/
#4 - June 22, 2014, 05:22 PM

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OMGoodness! So helpful. Thank you.
This pump, is it like a chemo pump or pump someone uses for pain? Like inserted into the skin?
#5 - June 22, 2014, 10:14 PM

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Also, any idea what the person is feeling when they are having a diabetic reaction? I was never sure if my Uncle knew what was going on. Of course I was young, but I'm wondering what a person feels going through that.
#6 - June 22, 2014, 10:22 PM

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Also, (sorry) do people have special pocket/purses that keep insulin cold if they are going to be away for a day etc? How's that work?
#7 - June 22, 2014, 10:32 PM

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My brother-in-law has a small lunchbox/cooler that he carries with him when he travels until he can place the insulin in a refrigerator. Here's a good article on insulin therapy that might help you:


http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/diseases-conditions/diabetes/treatment/insulin-therapy.html
#8 - June 23, 2014, 04:10 AM

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My daughter developed diabetes at age 3. She's now 28 --a nurse and a wonderful wife and mother. She wears a pump, but diabetics still must test their blood sugar (finger pricks) several times a day to maintain tight control. When her blood sugar drops too low, she gets shakey, irritable and very hungry --specifically craving sweets --but some people pass out--or appear "drunk"  when this happens. If you have any specific questions feel free to send me a message.


Andria
#9 - June 23, 2014, 05:46 AM
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 :thanks2
You guys have been most helpful-Thank you so much. Thanks for the links and Andi W>, as I progress through my work I will take you up on the offer.
#11 - June 23, 2014, 11:05 PM

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